The CHIDAKASHA GITA demystified


Chidakasha Gita is the sacred compilations of the words that ‘spilled’ from Bhagwan Nithyananda. Since Bhagwan always lived in communion with the Supreme, every word that came out from him were very meticulously collected by one of his early devotees named Tulasi Amma. All the collections of the Chidakasha Gita are a direct attempt of the timely work of Tulasi Amma, to whom we need to be fully grateful to, because without her, the world would have never known what the great incarnation had ever spoken of. These were first published in Kannada language by Tulasi Amma after consent from Bhagwan. It is from these collections that the teachings of Bhagwan Nithyananda came to be known to the world.

IMPORTANT: It must be always remembered that the words of Bhagwan contains his expressions of the great mysteries of life. The dimensions and states he moved in on the planet, are states unaccessible to the humans, accept to the precious few who have strived to reach the peaks of human consciousness. Hence, it becomes a privilege to receive drops of that nectar that flowed from those realms.  Thus, whenever Bhagwan spoke in a trance-like state, words obviously must have fell short, to perhaps cover his flow in entirety, but fortunately whatever was picked by Tulasi Amma, she gifted it to the world.  This book remained not very popular because the words did not make much sense to the masses, but it contains a hidden wealth of wisdom of life. It reveals much details about a seeker’s journey on the path of consciousness. Hence, it must be a seeker’s effort to raise one’sconsciousness to make these precious words ‘readable’. That is why it is always recommended that the Chidakasha Gita must not be read, but meditated upon, in pure silent awareness, so as to get the message into our consciousness.

Hence, i would highly recommend that readers always directly meditate on the teachings from Chidakasha Gita and refer to the insights mentioned here, only if one is finding difficulty in understanding the words of Bhagwan.

All the insights that i was able to provide here, are completely by the grace of Bhagwan and the grace of my Master, from whom i received the wisdom, from where it was possible for me to relate to the teachings of Bhagwan.

So, i highly recommend, that you first always read the direct message, meditate on it and contemplate on it, and only in case of difficulty refer to the insights provided. Nevertheless, this itself shall become a great practice for studying and practicing the words of Bhagwan more deeper and more profoundly.

|| Om Namo Bhagwavate NIthyanandaya ||

Note: If you wish to share these please do so in entirety by referring to this page.
Kindly do not fall for plagiarism so as to keep the authenticity of these texts intact.

Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 1 

“Jnanis are mindless. To Jnanis, all are the same. They have no slumber, no dreams, nor sleep. They are always in sleep. The sun and the moon are the same to them. To them, it is always sunrise. The glass of a chimney lamp, when covered with carbon, is not transparent. Similarly, the carbon of the mind should be removed.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan refers to Jnanis (liberated ones) as mindless. When there is no mind, there is no duality or discrimination. When there is no discrimination, all appear the same to Jnanis. Because there is no mind, there is no slumber nor sleep nor dreams. They are always in ‘sleep’. This sleep Bhagwan is referring to the Turiya state of deep meditation or samadhi state. It is a state where the minds of the liberated ones actually get merged into the infinite consciousness and they no more have a mind of their own. Even the sun and moon are same to them without any duality or discrimination. To them, it is always sunrise, always brightness, always light. Bhagwan refers to the glass of a chimney lamp, which when covered with carbon (soot) loses its transparency and the light dims because of the dark glass. Bhagwan is referring to carbon as the impurities of the mind, like thoughts, desires, emotions of all kinds. So, he says, the impurities of the mind also should be removed just as we remove the carbon from the chimney glass so that the bright light shine through.

Additional Notes

What does it mean by Mindless?

Mindless is referred here to as “having no mind”. Mind is the cause for karma because it is in the mind that all samskaras (psychic impressions) lie. All vrittis (mental modifications) cause the mind to think, discriminate, cause emotions, and even make one do each and every action). Every human has 5 koshas or sheaths out of which only one is gross and can be seen and touched, that is the physical sheath (annamaya kosha). The other 4 sheaths are pranamaya kosha (breath or etheric body), manomaya kosha (mind or emotional body), gyanamaya kosha (intellectual body), anandamaya kosha (bliss body). In these the manomaya kosha is linked with the mann or mind. This sheath gets annihilated or dissolved and merged with higher sheaths and that is when the mind is dissolved. So when the mind is completely purified of all these impressions, one becomes mindless. That is how the liberated ones (Avadhootas) have no mind of their own and thus any of their actions are not motivated by any selfish motives, but they operate now through the cosmic mind.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 2 

“There are three nadis in the body: the sun or the Sushumna; the moon or the Ida; the star or the Pingala. The first is red in color, the second, blue, and the third, green.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan mentions here of the three major nadis (subtle nerves) – the Sushumna, Ida & Pingala nadis. The Sushumna is referred as to Sun and as red in color. The Ida is referred to as the Moon and of blue color. The Pingala is referred to as the star and green in color.

Additional Notes

What are Nadis?

Nadis are subtle nerves situated in the next subtle layer on the physical layer, called as Pranamaya Kosha. These nadis are responsible for carrying cosmic currents or energies that keeps the body alive. There 72,000 nadis in a human, out of which 3 are the most important major nadis, which is what Bhagwan is pointing towards in this verse.

The Sushumna nadi runs through the spinal cord from the base of the spine to the crown of the head and is referred to as the Sun. The other two nadis, the Ida nadi and the Pingala nadi run in a zig-zag fashion around the sushumna nadi, intersecting through each chakras to the pineal gland located at the Agna chakra. The Ida runs on the left and Pingala runs on the right of the spinal cord.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 3 

“Where these three nadis meet, is the heart space. As we go on practicing yoga, the Bindu-sound is heard in the head. This sound is one, indivisible.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan mentions that where these 3 major nadis meet, that is the heart space, which is referred in Sanskrit as Hridya Aakash. Bhagwan says as one goes on practicing Yoga (not just precisely yogasana – we will see this more clearly in forthcoming teachings) the Bindu sound is heard, which is also referred to as the Anhad Naad, which is a sound not caused through duality but is the one indivisible sound.

Additional Notes

What is Anhad Naad?

Anhad means infinite or limitless or nondual. Nada means sound.  So here anhad  he is referring to the nondual sound or the unstruck sound.  Because for creation of any sound, two is needed. Like two things must collide or come together to create that sound, like a clap or a drum or even a thunder. But the anhad (unstruck) naad or sound is created from one, from nonduality, from the infinite, meaning, it originates on it’s own, that is from the Supreme source. This sound is heard only after chitta vritti nirodaha or after all the vrittis (waves or disturbances) of the mind are dissolved.

Anahata Naad manifests itself in various forms and it can range from the sound resembling the sound of sea to the sound of huge bells to the sound of shank (chonch). It is the experience of adepts that when the sound of flute is heard the entire being permeates with divine bliss and the body consciousness is lost.  Similarly, when the sound of kettledrum is heard, the individual develops clairvoyance and the ability to see distant things. But ultimately, the naad that leads seekers to the ultimate goal of yoga, that is the Nirvikalpa Samadhi, is the known as the meghanaad – the sound of thunder.

According to the “HANSOPINISHAD” there are 10 types of Anhad Naad:

  1. The First one is ” CHHINI”
  2. The Second is “CHHICHHINI”
  3. The Third sound is “BELL”
  4. The Fourth sound of CONCHSHELL”
  5. The Fifth sound of Indian LUTE ( TANTRI)
  6. The sixth sound of “DRUM”
  7. The seventh sound of “FLUTE “
  8. The Eight sound of “TABOR” ( MRIDANGA)”
  9. The ninth sound of “KETTLEDRUM” (BHERI)
  10. The last one is the sound of “THUNDER CLOUDS”

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 4 

Just as camphor is consumed by the flames of fire, so also, mind must be consumed by soul fire.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan is referring camphor (karpur) to mind and fire to soul. So, he says that just like how the camphor burns itself out completely without a trace  when it is touched by fire, the mind also must be dissolved into the soul, by the soul fire.

Additional Notes

What does it mean mind dissolving into soul?

Please refer to additional notes of verse 1, in which it was seen how we are not just the physical body but a combination of 5 sheaths (layers), in which one of the layer is the mind sheath or manomaya kosha.  With consistent spiritual practices this layer gets completely dissolved and merged into the real you, the soul. Bhagwan refers soul fire to spiritual practices that will burn the impurities of the mind, thus dissolving the mind and merging it into the soul. In verse 1 Bhagwan refers this state of mindlessness to the state of Jnanis (self-realised).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 5 

The copra, detached from the shell, makes a dull sound when shaken; so also the body and soul must be thought of as separate. The first is light; by that light, all vices are consumed.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan talks of how the copra (dried coconut) inside the kernel of the coconut detaches itself as it dries, and at that time if the coconut is shaken, a dull sound can be heard of the copra moving inside it. Bhagwan refers to the kernel or the shell of the coconut as body and the copra he refers to the soul. He thus says that with practice of Yoga, a seeker will gradually learn to see the body and soul as separate. But he says that light is of prior importance (“first is light”). Like verse 3, he refers to the soul fire as light. It is from this light that all the vices or impurities (of the mind) are destroyed.

Additional Notes

So, by now, we can realize that the verses of Chidakasha Gita are not in bits and pieces, but it is a chain of teachings, like the beads in a rosary. All verses in continuity and linked with each other. It is thus important that the verses must be read in sequence from the start. So from the start till now, it can be observed that Bhagwan is only speaking about the importance of ‘dissolving the mind’ by destroying it’s impurities.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 6 

Just as we draw water from a well, we should draw breath; when we breathe out, it should be like letting down the bucket into the well. When we breathe out, it is the carbon; when we breathe in, it is the breath of Omkar. Breath of Omkar is the manas.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan states that just like water is drawn in a bucket from the well, the breath also must be similarly drawn in during inhalation, and while exhaling, it should be like letting the empty bucket down into the well. He adds that what we breathe out is the carbon (impurities of the mind -refer to verse 1)  and what we breathe in, is the breath of Omkar, meaning the breath of life.  Bhagwan says then that the breath of Omkar is the mind, which is the true mind or the pure mind.

Additional Notes

In just one small verse Bhagwan has revealed a whole sadhana (spiritual practice) in itself. This practice is a key practice in Kundalini sadhana and is related with breathwork. Many practices today teach this in varied formats. A word of caution is that one must never attempt Kundalini sadhana on their own, and needs to be done under the guidance of a Kundalini guru. The general practice referred here is basically breathing but practitioners who are already practicing any form of Kundalini sadhana will know precisely the deeper practice that is being referred to.

In this verse, Bhagwan firstly talks about the importance of breathwork and the importance of linking each breath with the “Aum” mantra. He refers each breath (inhalation and exhalation) to the drawing of the well water with a rope bucket. Every breath taken in (inhalation) brings pure cosmic energy from the Cosmos into the body (precisely through the pranamaya kosha – pranayama means disciplining of the prana) and cleanses the other koshas including the manomaya kosha (mind). Every breath out (exhalation) carries the subtle impurities from the koshas. Inhalation brings in pure cosmic energy, when the “Aum” mantra is added to the inhalation. Omkar is Om (Aum), which is the pranava mantra. Pranva in sanskrit means ‘life force’ or ‘life giver’ and it is out of this Omkar the whole cosmos birthed. Bhagwan links this powerful life-infusing mantra to the inhalation. He further also says that the breath of Omkar is the true mind, a purified mind. Refer to verse 1, where Bhagwan mentions that the carbon (impurities) of the mind has to be removed to attain a pure mind).

It is important to know that from verse 1 till here, Bhagwan has been only talking of purifying the mind with “Yoga”. Now this is the “Yoga” and not really the Yogasanas. The meaning of Yoga is “to unite” – the union of individual consciousness with the Supreme consciousness, and he is referring to Pranayama and Raj Yog (meditation), which will be seen in the future verses.

It is also important to note that, this entire practice needs one’s conscious efforts to be done with total awareness, without which it may not yield desired results.

The practitioners of Kundalini sadhana will know that this verse is precisely pointing deeper to “spinal cord breathing”.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 7

“Manas is Jeeva; but their positions are different. Jeevatman is Paramatman.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the mind (manas) is Jeeva (individual), meaning that the mind is the cause of maya. Jeeva is the individual who is bound in maya and thus living in ignorance, but all Jeevas are different in position, meaning at different states of consciousness.  Bhagwan refers the Jeevatman to individual consciousness and Parmatman to supreme consciousness, and thus he says that Jeevatman is Parmatman  meaning you are god.

Additional Notes

Jeeva means any living being – an insect, animal, bird, human. Atman means soul. So, here when Bhagwan says Jeevatman he is referring to the soul of the human being. Parmatman means god or the supreme consciousness. Every soul is a spark of that supreme force or a particle of that supreme. This is how he refers that every living being (jeevatman) is god (parmatman).

How is manas a jeeva (mind a living entity)?

It should be known firstly that only humans have mind sheath. No other living entity has the privilege of having a mind. But then, the moment mind comes in, the individual soul now becomes an independent thinking being, who is now capable of freewill and thus he takes decisions based on the contents of his mind. The mind thus gives rise to the separateness because it now creates a false identity of its own, which is popularly known as the false “I” or the ego. The real “I” is the Atman. What makes the Jeeva separate from god consciousness is the ego that exists because of the mind. Hence Bhagwan states “Manas is Jeeva” (meaning mind is the living entity) but he continues saying that their positions are different, meaning all individual are at different stages, depending on the contents of their mind, even though they are all god (Jeevatman is Parmatman)

The Upanishads explains the difference between Jeeva, Atma and Parmatma. It states  that the Jeeva is like a tree. Sitting in that tree are two birds: one the Atma, and the other the Paramatma. Paramatma witnesses the Atma eating the fruit of the tree. Parmatma waits for the Atma to turn to him. This is the situation of every Jeeva – it is too busy enjoying the fruit of the tree (Jeeva that is enjoying through the mind and senses). When the Jeeva becomes fed up with the enjoyment of the fruit, only the its attention turns towards Parmatma.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 8

“A man or woman should be educated. What is education? Jeeva should know the secret that He is the Paramatman.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that men and women must be educated on the real education. The real education that the Jeeva (human being) is not a finite mortal being but none other than the infinite and immortal Parmatman (god).

Additional Notes

This verse indicates Bhagwan’s instruction to educate the world that they are themselves manifestation of god. A Jeeva remains a jeeva (living entity) until it realises this. It is important to know that every living entity is called Jeeva. Even animals, insects and plants are Jeeva, that is why they are referred to as Jeeva-Jantu. It is only the privilege of human beings to realise their own divinity, which is why it is said that it is a great blessing that a soul gets a human incarnation, because it is only with the human incarnation that the soul can make use to realise it’s divinity and thus remember who it really is, and thus get liberated from the endless loop of life and death. Even powerful beings of the subtle higher or lower worlds cannot get liberated and this is only possible through a human incarnation. That is why Bhagwan is emphasising that men and women must be educated on this reality and that this secret of how man is god, must be made known to them, and that is the real education.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 9

“Paramatman is in Jeevatman. The real Mukti is to know the subtle in the gross.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan repeats in this verse that God (Parmatman) is man (Jeevatman). The real liberation is to realise the subtle (soul) in the gross (physical body).

Additional Notes

Like the previous verse, Bhagwan is emphasising that realising that “I am god” is real liberation. In previous verse he said “Jeeva should know this secret, but in this verse he uses the word Jeevatman. There is a difference between Jeeva and Jeevatman.

Until man realises that he/she is god, it remains only a Jeeva. When this education is realised by a human, he/she realises that he/she is not just a body but a soul (Atman), it realises that it is not Jeeva but Jeevatman (Jeeva+Atman). But Bhagwan does not stop there but goes further to reveal the secret that the Jeevatman is actually the Parmatman (Param+Atman)  or the Supreme Being. When the Jeevatman realises this, it is called as self-realisation, where the soul has not realised it’s real Self, that is, God. This is why self-realisation is also known as god-realisation, after which the soul becomes eligible for mukti or liberation from the bondage of the birth and death cycle. Bhagwan further says that this is real (mukti) liberation, where now the Jeeva is experiencing itself as Jeevatman, or experiencing the subtle (soul) in the gross (body) {also see verse 5}. 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 10

“We should leave off the gross sleep and sleep the subtle sleep. We should enjoy the sleep obtained from the practice of Pranayam.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan mentions that we must gradually move from the gross sleep to subtle sleep. He reveals that this subtle sleep can be enjoyed as the fruits of the practice of pranayam. The subtle sleep that he is pointing to is Yog Nidra or deep conscious sleep. Pranayam is being referred to the internal breath work.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan mentions of two kinds of sleep – the gross and subtle sleep. The gross sleep is that which probably 99% of the humans sleep at night, where the body is rested but this is unconscious sleep, where the sleeper is as good as dead during the sleep because the sleeper is not aware of himself. He becomes aware only when he wakes up, either when the gross sleep is disrupted in between or when he wakes up the next morning. This unconscious sleep is what is referred to as “gross sleep”. The “subtle sleep” is a sleep of awareness. When one enters into the state of awareness even while in sleep it is known as Yog Nidra. This is being referred to as subtle sleep. This need not necessarily be the sleep of the night; even when one enters into deep meditation during wakeful hours, he enters into subtle sleep or samadhi. Bhagwan says that the bliss of this subtle sleep (conscious sleep) is obtained by the practice of pranayam (breathwork).

The 5 states of consciousness

Going much into the depth of this teaching, to understand this, it is essential to know the 5 states of consciousness.

  1. Jagrat or Wakeful state: This is the state in which we are fully awake in mind and body and doing our regular activities of daily life, through the 5 sense organs with the use of vision, taste, smell, sound or touch.
  2. Svapna or Dream state: This is the state in which the mind enjoys the the 5 senses only in the mind, because only the mind is awake in this state while the body with its 5 sense organs are at rest.  In the dream state, we imitate or relive the experiences that we had in the jagrit or wakeful state.  The mind itself is the one who reflects it, sees it, enjoys or gets affected by it positively or negatively. Due to this activity, peaceful sleep is disrupted because even though the body is at rest but the mind is fully at play. The first two are the gross sleep that Bhagwan is mentioning about.
  3. Sushupti or Sleep state: This is the state in which the body and the mind, both are at rest. There is absence of dream and thus one enters into deep peaceful sleep. This is when one feels very refreshed in the morning and even states of having “enjoyed a sound sleep” but still unaware of how is it really possible to enjoy something even when the mind, body and ego were at sleep. This knowing of having a sound sleep, is actually the experience of the soul in awareness that was witnessing the sound sleep.
  4. Turiya state: This is the state where the real you (soul) experiences the soul itself.  Here the individual is aware of his own consciousness and of himself being available and present as pure awareness. This can be referred to as Savikalpa Samadhi. Thoughts may arise during this state but the individual is completely nonreactive as it is in a pure awareness state.
  5. Turiyatita or Chidakasha state: This is the state where the ego is completely dissolved with no existence and thus it is an expansion or merging of the soul into the limitless or the infinite. It is a completely nondual state where the union of the soul or self has taken place with the Supreme. This state is the Nirvikalpa Samadhi. Various popular expressions of this state are:
    I am that I am ~ I am God ~ I am Shiva ~ Shivohum ~ Aham Brahmasi ~ Tatvamasi
  • The 1st state is of the Waker who is experiencing the gross physical world.
  • The 2nd state is of the Dreamer who is experiencing the subtle mind-projected world.
  • The 3rd state is of the Deep-Sleeper who is experiencing the unmanifest world.
  • The 4th state is of the Self who is experiencing itself as the Supreme or God or the Cosmos.

So, when Bhagwan says, “We should leave off the gross sleep and sleep the subtle sleep” this is what he means. That we must move from the 1st and 2nd states to higher states of consciousness.  When he says, ” We should enjoy the sleep obtained from the practice of Pranayam” he is simply pointing towards the possibility of attaining these higher states through deep breathwork (Pranayam)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 11

The upgoing breath is like the wheels inside a clock. Its movement is inside; when the movement of the breath is internal, one will see the world in himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the upgoing breath (prana) is just like the wheels of the clock that is moving inside but cannot be seen. When the external breath is internalised (through breathwork), the practitioner will also internalise and begin seeing the world within himself.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan compares the upgoing breath to the wheels of a clock. There are so many wheels inside a clock and there is so much actually happening with the internal coordination of these wheels. From the outside, all that we can see is a smoothly and systematically functioning clock, but inside the clock so many wheels are moving and working to keep up the functioning and existence of the clock. Same happens with us. Externally, we may not notice how the body is functioning in a very simple and easy manner but deep inside there are many systems working with great precision at all times. Prana is the fuel of all systems and to keep a human alive. But greater things are possible when this prana and internalised and sublimated upward. Bhagwan compares these wheels of the clock to the internalised breath (prana) revealing  that when one internalises the breath, one is actually working on the subtle breath, which is governed by the same cosmic intelligence that runs this cosmos. External breath is the air you breathe. Internal breath is the subtle breath or prana. So, he says that “when the movement of breath is internal” meaning when you gain control over your subtle breath (prana) and are able to channelize it, then you are actually aligning with the same cosmic intelligence that governs this whole cosmos. So, just like the external breath is internalised, the external world (macrocosm) also begins to get internalised (microcosm) and one begins to see the world within as he is now experiencing nonduality within and out.

What is internalising of breath?

Bhagwan did not mention the word breath but he says “upgoing breath” Read verse 6, to understand the process of breathing that Bhagwan referred to. In that verse, we see clearly that he is not talking just about the physical breath of air that we breathe in and our, but he is referring to the prana. In that verse, we already saw that external breath is air that is breathing in of oxygen and breathing out of carbon-dioxide but if that is internalized (spinal cord breathing) like drawing in bucket of water in a well, then the internal breath is all about prana moving through the spinal cord up and down. This is what is meant by internalising of breath. With this process, the Kundalini or chit shakti begins rising from lower chakras to higher chakras. This is referred to as the upgoing breath, the movement of prana upwards. Eventually, with purification, the seeker begins to experience that he and god are not different (verse 7) and that is when one begins experiencing the cosmos within.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 12

Just as we see the sky reflected in the water in an earthen pot, so also, to the internal vision, the sky of consciousness becomes visible.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when one internalises the vision, the whole sky of consciousness becomes visible within just like how externally we see the sky’s reflection in a pot of water.

Additional Notes

In the previous verse (11), Bhagwan was talking of internalising the external breath. Similarly, in this verse he talks about internalising the external vision. The physical eyes is the external vision that sees the gross world. There is an inner eye (often referred to as the third eye)  is the internal eye that can see the subtle world, which is invisible to the external physical eyes.  This verse, please note, is in continuity to the previous verse, where Bhagwan had mentioned that when one internalises the external breath, one sees the external world within, that is the subtle world. This “seeing” of the external world internally is what is being referred to the internal vision in this verse. It says that through internal vision, the sky of consciousness (Chidakasha) becomes visible just as vividly the external eyes sees the reflection of the sky in an earthen pot of water. The pot is the seeker. The water is the sky of consciousness (Chidakasha)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 13

If food is prepared in a gold vessel, the dog eats it. If it is prepared in an earthen vessel, then also the dog eats it.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the dog eats the food if it is prepared in a golden vessel and even eats it if prepared in an earthen vessel. It makes no difference to the dog.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan is referring the dog’s lack of discrimination between gold and mud, to the state of a Jnani (self-realised beings). Just like the dog only sees the food and not the quality of the vessel in which the food is served, a Jnani also sees only the god in every human and living being, with no discrimination made on the basis of religion, caste, colour, gender, nationality, species, etc. He does not discriminate between superior and inferior, rich and poor, good and bad, and so on, because everything is now one for him and there is no sense of any duality left in him. He is now operating in complete nonduality, where for him, both gold and dust are alike.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 14

The sun-light is reflected in the salt water of the sea. It is also reflected in the clear water of a tank at the top of a hill. It is not enough if we see with the eye but we should experience it.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the sunlight is reflected both in the salt water of the sea as well as also reflected in the clear water of a water tank on top of a hill. He adds that just seeing this is not enough, but one should be able to actually experience this.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan continues speaking on nonduality (read previous verse for continuity) and in this verse mentions how a Jnani sees everything as one. The consciousness of a Jnani is like the sunlight that reflects on any water, irrespective of whether it is salty waters of the sea or fresh water of a water body on a hill. The sunlight reflects without any discrimination. The Sun can be referred to god or supreme consciousness and the sunlight is the presence of god in salty and freshwater alike, without any bias. After revealing nonduality with clear two examples (in verse 13 & 14)  he then says that just seeing (nonduality) in this way is not enough, but it must be experienced. Meaning, just wisdom of Oneness and nonduality is not enough, but one must become a Jnani (self-realised) and experience it in reality.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 15

On a tree grow numberless flowers; the flowers all perish; but the tree does not perish for a long time. The visible is like flowers, the invisible is like the tree.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that many flowers grow on a tree and these flowers will soon perish, but the tree does not perish for a long time. All that is visible is like the flowers  and that which is invisible is like the tree.

Additional Notes

In very simple words Bhagwan is talking of the invisible soul that does not perish for long. He compares the soul to a tree that remains for a very long time than the flowers that everyday blossom, fall, die and perish. He refers the flowers to the visible things on the earth, and that everything that is seen is shortlived and perishes with time, but what does not perish and remains for a long time is the soul. Why does he say tree remains for long time or the soul remains for a long time. Like how the tree also perishes are a long time and returns back to nature by dissolving into the five elements, similarly the soul also after a long time of multiple births and evolution, finally returns back to its Source – god consciousness.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 16

There are matches in a matchbox. Fire is produced only when the match is rubbed against the side of the box. So also, the Manas (mind) is the match; intellect (Buddhi) is the side of the box. We should rub the Manas against Buddhi and then we get the kingdom of Self which is the same as the liberation from the cycle of birth and death.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan talks of matches in a matchbox. He says fire is produced when the matchstick is rubbed on the side of the box. He compares the mind (manas) to the matchstick and he compares intellect (buddhi) to the igniting paper on the side of the matchbox. He says the mind should be rubbed against the intellect and only then we get to know the kingdom of the self, which is nothing but liberation from the cycle of birth and death.

Additional Notes

Why does the mind need to be rubbed against buddhi?

Buddhi is intellect. The world largely considers intellect and intelligence as the same, however they are not. Intellect and intelligence are completely different. Intelligence is information; the memory of the knowledge that is gathered from the outside world. Intellect is wisdom acquired from internal consciousness. Intelligence makes you clever, intellect makes you wise. Intellect is the decision-making capacity after inspecting the intelligence.  For example, knowing how to skilfully use a knife is intelligence, but the decision whether to use it for cutting vegetables or hurt someone is done by the intellect.

Bhagwan is asking to constantly rub the mind against intellect. Mind is nothing but intelligence, where it retains all skills and information based on the experiences of the individual. So, it is as good as saying ‘rub intelligence against intellect’. If one does not rub the mind with the intellect, then all actions will be done without proper discernment, without rightful discrimination of right and wrong. What we call as ‘unknowingly done’ is nothing but intelligence (mind) without intellect (buddhi). So, rubbing the mind against intellect keeps sharpening the intellect.  And when that is done, Bhagwan says, we realise the kingdom of the Self, meaning we attain the true knowledge of the Self (self-realisation), which he says is as good as attaining liberation from the repeated cycles of birth and death. One attains mukti or moksha or salvation.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 17

A man should be quite indifferent to honour and dishonour. He should not have the least love for his body; such a man will see the Supreme Being in everything and everywhere.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that one must remain indifferent to honour and dishonour. He further says that one should not have even little love for his body and for such a person it is possible to see the supreme in everything and everywhere.

Additional Notes

This is an extension of the verse 13 & 14, where Bhagwan talks on developing  nonduality and seeing god in everyone and everything. without any discrimination like how for the dog food given in gold vessel or earthen vessel is the same. Similarly, in this verse Bhagwan says one should have not difference between honour and dishonour, praise or criticism. He next says not to have the least love for the body, meaning that it is only when one identifies with the body that honour and dishonour affects him positively or negatively, because the body carries the identity of the person to which the person is attached to. When a person is attached to his identity or personality, he is sure to be affected by honour and dishonour or by praise or criticism. He further says that when one is least identified with the body and gives up the attachment of the body, he will begin seeing the supreme being or god in everyone and everything around. So, till the time he is identified with his separate identity, he is affected by duality (good and bad, pride and hurt, honour and dishonour) but when his identity dissolves, his duality dissolves and he begins living in nonduality now, with least discrimination. This is the Oneness principle emphasised at various parts of the Chidakasha Gita by Bhagwan.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 18

The Supreme Light and the Universal Light are identical.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that there is no difference between the Supreme Light and the Universal Light.

Additional Notes

Usually, the Supreme Light and Universal Light are considered to be different. Universal Light is the one light of the Universe. You could compare this Universal Light to the Sun of our Universe that as one source of light illuminates the whole Universe. Everything in the Universe comes under this light. All religions also sprouted from this Universe. All the religions have their own light but the one light that illuminates them is the Universal Light, just like how the sun illuminates all individuals of all religions alike.

Supreme Light is the light of God, the light of the Creation itself.  In the cosmos or creation, there are countless such Universes like ours with countless such suns, but the one illuminator of all the Universes is the Supreme Light (god’s light). Bhagwan thus says there is no difference in the Supreme light and Universal light because it is one and the same, exactly like how He explained in verse 7 & 8 that there is no difference between Parmatma (god) and Jeevatma (individual) and both are one; man is god.

Many religions honour the Supreme as light and even refer to individual soul as light or flame (jyoti) – the true meaning of the song “Jyot se Jyot Jagao”. You can see the word used is “Jyot Jagao” (awaken) and not “jalao” (light up) because the flame of the lamp is lit and not awakened. But this song is referring the light of the Satguru (Master) as the Universal Light. It seeks that the Satguru (Univeral Light) awaken the seeker’s flame with the Master’s flame, meaning light the individual lamp with the Universal lamp. But at the very ground level there is ignorance in humans of not knowing that humans are light, there is non-acceptance that all religions are one universal light, and thus ignorance of not knowing that the universal light is nothing but the supreme light. This ignorance is known as darkness, the opposite of light. This is why the song further goes as – “Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.) Mera antar timir mitao (burn my inner darkness of ignorance), Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.)

…… and so the Vedic prayer:

Asato ma sad gamaya (Lead us from non-being to being)
Tamaso ma jyotir gamaya (Lead us from darkness to light)
Mrityor ma amritam gamaya (Lead us from death to immortality)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 19

“From a plank, are manufactured tables, chairs, etc, etc. So also, Brahman is the primordial substance (element) from which numberless worlds are formed.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like how tables, chairs and other furnitures are manufactured from a wooden plank, the countless worlds are also formed from the Brahman or the Supreme source. 

Additional Notes

In the previous verse, in the additional notes, it was described as to how there is not one Universe but countless Universes that we are not aware of. In this verse Bhagwan is referring to the same “numberless worlds” meaning countless worlds that are all formed from the nothingness. The ‘nothingness’ is what we term as Brahman, from whom the creation has come into form, and that is why Brahma is referred to as the Creator. This tatwa (element) is also referred to as Brahma Tatwa or Param Tatwa, which means the primordial substance or element. Bhagwan already in the earlier verses stated that every being is Brahman, but they have not realised it yet. That is why the wisdom of knowing that one is god (god-realisation) is called Brahma Gyan. So with a simple metaphor he compares the chairs, tables and other furniture materials coming into existence out of a wooden plank with all the countless Universes or worlds coming into existence out of the Brahman.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 20

Manas and the Atman are the same to all people. At the final stage of the universe, all is one. At the present stage, there is difference in their mode of breathing, thinking, and their mental tendencies.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the mind and the soul are the same to everyone. At the final stage of the Universe, all becomes one. But at the present stage there is difference in their way of breathing, thinking and their mental attitudes.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that in reality there is no difference between the mind and the soul, and that this is known only in the final stage of the Universe (when dissolution happens) when all become one and nondual. But at the moment, due to ignorance of maya (illusion), everyone sees the mind and soul as separate, full of dualities. The difference happens due to the different ways each human breathes and thinks as per their mental tendencies.

It may be reminded that every human thinks differently, because each are in different state of consciousness. The state of consciousness comes from the individual’s karmic patterns. Karmic patterns are formed by psychic impressions or samskaras stored in their psyche. The psychic impressions or samskaras are the cause for the individual’s mental tendencies (vasanas).  The breath pattern changes as per the mental tendencies. Bhagwan’s this verse is emphasising on the breath, and this verse is cross-linked to verse 6 & 11, where Bhagwan has revealed the secret of the breathwork by which the karmic patterns can be influenced, which alters the state of consciousness and that dissolves the illusion of duality enabling one to see the Oneness of everything. (For more details on vasanas and samskaras, read verse 90)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 21

Fire, air, water, and earth are common to all. These may be used by all people alike . Similarly, well-water may be used by a Brahmin, a pariah, and children alike.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that fire, air, water, and earth are common to all and can be used by everyone alike. In the same way, the well water also can be used by anyone, be it a Brahmin, an pariah (outcaste) or children alike.

Additional Notes

The earth and everything in it is made up of 5 elements (ether, air, fire, water and earth) and thus Bhagwan says these are common to all or that these elements are common in all. Anyone and everyone is entitled to all these elements of nature. Similarly, Bhagwan is emphasising that just like that, even the well water belongs to to everyone, be it a Brahmin or an outcaste or a child. These words were spoken during times, when casteism and untouchability was prevalent in India, and Bhagwan is taking this example of caste discrimination with spiritual discrimination. Spiritual discrimination happens when people are discriminated to spiritual wisdom based on religion, path, community, practice, belief, faith, culture, tradition, etc. So, with the example of nondiscrimination with well water, Bhagwan is pointing towards the practice of spiritual nondiscrimination also, thus conveying that the spiritual wisdom is entitled to every human being and no discrimination of any kind should be made as all have the right to drink the wisdom on the self and divine and it’s secrets, just like a Brahmin or an outcaste or a child has all the right to the natural well water.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 22

Manas is the gingilly; buddhi is the oil mill; amrita (ambrosia) is the oil.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the mind is like the gingilly seed, buddhi (intellect) is the oil mill and amrita (ambrosial nectar) is the oil that is churned by the buddhi (mill).

Additional Notes

This one line of Bhagwan has many deep secrets within its fold. This verse has reference to verse 16, where Bhagwan had stated that one must constantly rub the mind with the intellect to realise the kingdom of god (read verse 16 for details in depth to understand this verse better) . Bhagwan is referring the mind to gingilly seed (til in hindi) and refers the Buddhi (intellect) to the oil mill, where is gingilly seed (mind) is crushed in the oil mill (intellect). It is then that the oil (ambrosial nectar) will flow.

What is amrita (ambrosial nectar)

The ambrosial nectar is also known as the amrita or soma rasa or elixir and has been expounded by various mystic cultures around the world for eons. It is known as the nectar of immortality, which is also often referred to be as intoxicating as wine when drunk. Throughout the ages, for man, this immortal nectar has always remained a mystery and thus he has frantically been searching for this secret nectar across various geographical locations and man searches for it even today.  But the Kundalini path clearly explains that this ambrosial nectar is within every human and all these terms are just metaphors to the secret location within the human body itself. This divine nectar is produced by the ‘pineal gland’ in the human brain. Science has not fully known it’s functions. It cannot be activated physically but needs to be activated through altered states of consciousness by entering into meditative states. When it is activated, the pineal gland secretes this nectar, that drops and flows down the throat, where it is purified by the throat chakra and distributed further to other parts of the body via the nadis (see verse 2). Thus, the Yogi in the ecstasy of samadhi is often stated to be “drunk” with this nectar of bliss.  The very example of Lord Shiva drinking bhaang (an intoxicating drink) is widely misunderstood as Shiva getting drunk wine or alcoholic drink. This is only a metaphor pointing to this ambrosial nectar.

The amrita is what rejuvenates all the cells and organs and keeps the body young and active, and said to even give immortal life.

The pineal gland lies in the center of the brain and reciprocates to the BINDU point (third eye or ajna chakra). The same BINDU that Bhagwan has already referred to in verse 3. So, Bhagwan reveals in verse 16, that when the mind is constantly rubbed against buddhi  that this ambrosial fluid begins flowing. The Kundalini Yoga paths practices this.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 23

Buddhi is the king; Manas is the minister; Manas should be subordinated to Buddhi.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that buddhi (intellect) is the king, manas (mind) is the minister and that the mind should always be subordinate to the intellect.

Additional Notes

To know more about what buddhi (intellect) is and what mind is, please refer to insights of verse 7 & 16. Based on that it becomes clear that one must not allow the mind to become the king because if one allows that, then one will simply carry out decisions and actions based on whatever the mind says. Mind always says everything based on the imprints or memories of the past incidents and experiences (which might not necessarily be the truth or righteous) or from the knowledge it has gathered from outside (which also may not necessarily be truthful or right). The intellect (buddhi) is what discriminates between right and wrong, good or bad. Without an active intellect, a person becomes the slave of his mind, unable to control his thoughts, emotions and actions and goes indiscriminately with what his mind says. But if the intellect is sharp (see verse 16), its becomes the king and the mind remains a minister, important and useful, but under the control of the king (intellect). 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 24

When a road is crowded with five or six thousand people, it is almost impossible to drive a horse carriage along the road; the driver must be careful in driving the carriage. A cyclist’s attention is not directed towards himself but towards the passerby.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when a road is crowded with 5000 to 6000 people, it is almost impossible to drive a horse carriage along the road and the driver would need to be so careful in driving the carriage through. A cyclist’s attention remains not on himself but towards the passerby.

Additional Notes

 

Bhagwan refers to road as our spiritual path and refers the 5000-6000 crowd of people  to the numerous crowded thoughts and desires in our mind and refers the horse carriage to ourself. He says it is impossible to drive a horse carriage through a crowd of people, meaning it is impossible to move ahead on the spiritual path when there are so many thoughts and desires. It would be a struggle to move the carriage in such a crowd and the speed would also be very slow. Bhagwan then says that the cyclist’s attention remains not on himself but on the passerby, again pointing to the fact that one cannot have single-minded focus with so much of desires in life. For such a person, the attention will always be on the passerby and with inability to keep focus on himself. The horse carriage refers to a clogged path and the cyclist refers to a mind distracted through the passing thoughts and desires (passerby)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 25

When a man is entirely sunk in cold water, he no longer feels the cold of the cold water. A perfect man is not subject to anger.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when a man is fully submerged in cold water, he no longer feels any cold. A perfect man (Jnani) cannot be subject to anger.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that when you remain in cold water for sometime, you naturally tend to lose the coldness of the water. This is because your body has got acquainted with the cold now and thus become of the same nature of the water’s temperature. Only a person who has not been in cold water and has heat in his body will feel the reflex impact of the coldness of the water. Bhagwan is comparing the man in cold water to a Jnani (self-realised) who has now become one with the creation and realised his true self or true nature like the man who has become one with the water. He is actually a warm-blooded mammal but his nature has attuned with the temperature of the water. So, anything opposite to his nature does not affect him anymore (like the the cold does not affect the man). Bhagwan calls such a man as a perfect man, as his true nature becomes like that of the Supreme (still, calm, pure, limitless) and he never gets affected by anger or any other such adverse qualities.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 26

When a seed is fried, it cannot sprout. When a lamp contains no oil, we do not call it a lamp. When the sun is shining, a gaslight becomes dim. It is the sun that gives light to the whole world. If Manas is regarded as the king, buddhi may be regarded as the prime minister. When a tree does not bear fruits, it has no beauty. There is no effect without cause. In darkness light persists. Darkness is ignorance; light is Jnana (wisdom). One must see oneself . One must return to the place from whence one started. We must return the thing we have borrowed.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that  a fried seed cannot sprout again. A lamp without oil cannot be called a lamp. When the sun shines, the gaslight (a gas lamp) becomes dim. It is the sun that gives light to the whole world and not the gas lamp. If mind is regarded as the king, the intellect may be regarded as the prime minister. A tree bearing no fruits has no beauty. There is no effect without a cause. Light persists even in darkness, where darkness is the ignorance and wisdom is the light. One must see oneself and one must begin to return back to where he had started. All the things borrowed here (on earth) must be returned.

Additional Notes

This verse is the continuation of the previous verse where Bhagwan had mentioned that a perfect man cannot get angry. In this verse he is continuing saying that a fried seed cannot sprout again, meaning, that if all the desires/vasanas/tendencies/samskaras are fried (burnt out from the mind), no reactions can sprout again. When the oil itself is exhausted from the lamp, the lamp cannot be called a lamp anymore (referring to a perfect man who has exhausted all his karmas). He then says when the sun shines, a gaslamp light is automatically dimmed before the light of the sun. He is referring the light of the sun to a perfected man (self-realised) whose light is eternal and enlightening than an imperfect man’s (gaslight) limited light of wisdom, that is nothing before the universal light of the sun. It is the sunlight (a perfect being) that gives light to the whole world. Bhagwan repeats in this verse also, that if the mind is considered to be the King, the intellect then must be higher – the prime minister. He says when a tree does not bear fruit, then it has no beauty. referring to a perfect man, who bears the fruits for the world, which is what makes him beautiful. Hence, he points that everyone must make an attempt to be fruitful. Everything is cause and effect. Without the cause there can be no effect. Then he says that, in the ignorant also there is wisdom hidden – in the darkness also light persists. He is referring to light as the jnana or wisdom and darkness as ignorance. Because a man lost in maya is ignorant about his real identity (read verse 7, 8, 9). Bhagwan then says that one must see oneself – meaning know his true identity (read verse 7, 8, 9). One must return to the place he had started from, meaning return back to the Source. This can only happen when the darkness (ignorance) is destroyed by the inner light (wisdom) of the soul.  The verse ends with Bhagwan stating that we must return everything that we have borrowed. The soul came without anything and gathered everything from the Pancha Mahabhootas (5 natural elements – ether, air, fire, water, earth) and that includes the body too that was borrowed from the elements and all the possessions must be returned back.

Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 27

“A Guru will lead any sort of man from a thorny path to the royal road. Such preceptors are of two kinds. One is the primary preceptor and the other, the secondary preceptor. Mind is the primary preceptor and the other, the secondary preceptor one is not the preceptor of the other. He is only the secondary preceptor. The secondary preceptor is one who shows the water in the well. The Guru who exists in the heart of all beings is the Jagat-Guru.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a Guru will lead any kind of man from the thorny (ignorant) path to the royal (spiritual) path. Such preceptors (Guru) are of two kinds. One is the primary Guru and the other is the secondary Guru, where mind is the primary (inner) Guru. The secondary (external) Guru is not the Guru of the inner Guru. The external Guru is the one who shows the water in the well (self). The (inner) Guru who exists in the heart of all beings is the Jagat-Guru (universal teacher).

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that a Guru is the one who can lead any kind of a person from the path of darkness to the path of wisdom and light.  Such Gurus are of two kinds. The primary Guru is the mind (meaning the inner self) and the other Guru is the external (physical) Guru. The external Guru is not the Guru of the primary (inner) Guru, but is only the secondary Guru. The physical Guru is the one who shows the water in the well, meaning helps one realise their true inner self. The inner Guru, who exists in the heart of all beings, is the Jagat Guru or the universal Guru.

So, in simple words Bhagwan is stating that the prime Guru is one’s own inner self. The physical Guru from outside introduces one to the inner Guru, and is not the Guru of the inner Guru, because the inner Guru that exists in all beings is the Universal Guru.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 28

“People generally think that a teacher’s body is Guru. A man does not become a Guru by simply wearing sandals and counting beads on a rosary. One who talks “Brahma Jnana” and gives stones to his disciples is not a Guru. Whatever a Guru speaks in words, he must show it in action. First one must practice and after realisation, he must begin to teach others.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that people generally think that the teacher’s physical body is the Guru (read previous verse 27 for clarity). One does not become a Guru by simply wearing sandals and counting beads on a rosary. One who talks about the Brahma Jnana (gems of Ultimate Wisdom) and gives stones to his disciples is not a Guru. Whatever a Guru speaks in words, he must show it in action. First one must practice and after realisation, he teach others.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that mostly people misunderstand the Guru to be the physical body (read previous verse 27 for clarity). He says that one does not become a Guru by external attire like wearing of sandals or counting beads on a rosary (japa mala), meaning the outer appearance or outer practices are not the true determining factors if the person is a Guru or not. Also, one who talks of the gems of Bramha Jnana (wisdom of Self-Realisation) but gives stones to his disciples, is not a Guru. It is only after one practices what he preaches and after realisation of the Ultimate Truth through self-realisation, that he teaches others.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 29

One who has thoroughly wiped off the idea “I am the body” is fit to be called a Guru. There is none higher than such a one. There is no god above such a Guru. Such a Guru is God, and God is such a Guru.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who has thoroughly wiped off the idea that of “I am the body” is fit to be called a Guru. There is none higher than such a Guru. There is even no God above such a Guru. Such a Guru is God and God is such a Guru.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan further speaks on the quality of a true Guru. He says that only the one who has been able to completely wipe off the ignorance that one is not the body, is fit enough to be a Guru.  He says that there is none higher than such a Guru not even God because such a Guru is God himself and God himself is such a Guru. Bhagwan is emphasising on the true Guru not just intellectually knowing that one is not the body, but experientially remaining in the divine state of Nithyananda (eternal bliss) with no speck of duality – the state of Avadhootas.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 30

If you keep sugar apart from us, we cannot have experience of its sweetness. If we eat it, then only we know its taste. A man cannot get Mukti if he simply repeats “Rama, Krishna, or Govinda” for a thousand years. He must repeat it heartily (with true feelings).”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if you keep sugar away, you cannot know its sweetness. Only when one eats it, will one experience its taste. A man cannot get Mukti (liberation) simply by repeating ‘Rama, Krishna or Govinda’ even for a thousand years, but he must repeat it whole-heartedly.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that until one tastes sugar, the taste of the sugar can neither be known or described, but it is only when one tastes it, that he will experience what it exactly tastes like. Similarly, one cannot attain liberation simply by chanting the names of ‘Rama, Krishna or Govinda’ and even if that may be chanted for a thousand years. But the real chanting and benefit is when one chants it from the heart (full of love/devotion/emotions/feelings) or with the mind, body and soul.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 31

“Cow milk can never be bitter; the stone fixed in the earth cannot speak; by visiting places of pilgrimage like Benares (presently Varanasi) and Rameshwaram, a man cannot attain Mukti. What is essential is keeping the mind steady for a moment by introversion. Seeing earthen and stone images is not seeing God. It is mind’s hallucination when you regard images as God. Without true Jnana, Mukti cannot be attained. Our taking the human birth is the effect. Giving it back is the cause. We must know the cause and effect. Likewise, we must know the good and the evil; the right and the wrong. Knowing all, peace must be attained.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like the cow milk cannot be bitter and the stones in the earth cannot speak, man cannot attain liberation by undertaking pilgrimage to holy places like Varanasi and Rameshwaram. What is more essential is keeping the mind steady through introspection. Seeing stone and clay idols are not seeing God, but when one regards image or form to God, they are nothing but the mind’s hallucinations. Without true Jnana (wisdom) liberation is not possible. It is important to understand the cause and effect (of karma). Taking birth is the cause and giving it back is the cause. Likewise, we must know what is good and what is evil, what is right and what is wrong. Knowing all this, peace must be attained.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan clarifies many wrong superstitions and fantasies about the path of liberation. He says that just as certain that cow’s milk will never taste bitter and as certain as stones will never speak, it is certain that by undertaking pilgrimages to sacred places like Vanarasi or Rameshwaram, one attain mukti (liberation). But instead what is more important is to practice to keep the mind steady without wavering. Most previous verses above are indicative of how Bhagwan is emphasising on making the mind pure by which stillness and steadiness be achieved.

Further he says you cannot see God by looking at clay or stone idols, for even what you see is the mind’s hallucinations. Without the true wisdom about all this, liberation cannot be attained. It is more important to know the cause and effect (which brings humans again and again on the earth plane without allowing liberation from the birth-death cycle). Getting human birth is the cause and giving it back is the effect. Without understanding this there is no liberation (please refer below notes for more clarity on cause and effect).

Bhagwan further says that in this manner, knowing the cause and effect, we would be able to know the good and the evil, the right and the wrong, and thus knowing righteousness. This can happen when the power of discrimination (viveka) is sharp and for that, as per verse 16, 22 & 23, the buddhi must be sharpened. Finally, this current verse ends with Bhagwan stating that “Knowing all this, peace would be attained.”

What is cause and effect

Cause and effect is what we refer to as the law of Karma. For every cause there is an effect, meaning for every action there is a consequence, what seed you sow that fruit you reap. With what type seed of thought you sow, similar type of fruit of deed you will reap. With what type of seed of deed you sow, similar type of fruit of habit you will reap. With what type of seed of habit you sow, similar type of fruit of destiny you will reap. Every little thing in existence is the result of cause and effect. Putting your hand into fire is the cause and getting burnt is the effect. Speaking a harsh word is the cause. Getting back a harsh word or action from that person back sooner or later is the effect. Putting good food into the body is the cause and getting back good health is the effect. Putting bad thoughts into the mind is the cause and agitation, conflict, lack of peace, etc is the effect. This is how cause and effect work in human lives.

So it is important to understand this cause and effect is what Bhagwan says. This is how he is referring to the human birth also the outcome of the cause and effect. Taking human birth is the cause and giving it back (death) is the effect. Birth becomes the cause and death becomes the effect. When death happens, death becomes the cause now and next birth is the effect of that cause. And the birth and death so goes on, completely depending on the cause and effect. This is why Bhagwan says that unless this true wisdom of this cause and effect is  realised liberation is not possible.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 32

“If a building has no doors, we cannot call it a “house”. Without fire, we cannot heat water. Without air, fire cannot burn. Without food and sleep, a man can live for a few days but without air (breathing), a man cannot live even for a few seconds.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like how if a building has no doors, it cannot be called a house, just like how without fire the water cannot be heated, and just like how without air, fire cannot burn, similarly, without food and sleep it may be possible for a man to live for a few days, but without air, he cannot live even for a few seconds.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan is pointing to how important air is for a human being to live, because he may continue for a couple of days without food and water but without breath, he cannot live even for a few seconds. He compares this with how a building cannot be called a house if there are no doors and how without fire water cannot be heated and how without air, fire cannot burn (It needs air to blow and ignite fire and to also sustain fire – oxygen in the air is needed to keep fire alive).

Now, it is important to know here that Bhagwan is not simply talking about breathing air. He is actually talking about the prana. Air that we breath is gross and with that air what comes in is the subtle prana, that the body utilises for its sustenance. (He has explained this more deep in verse 11)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 33

“Destruction of the world means transforming it into Vayu; Raja Yoga is the place of indivisible monism. If you enter the ONE, you lose sight of the MANY.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that destruction of the world (duality) means transforming it into air (nonduality) for which Raja Yoga(Royal Path) is the means of indivisible monism (Oneness). If you enter the ONE (nondual), you automatically lose sight of the MANY (dual).

Additional Notes

Bhagwan in this verse is talking of how to transcend from duality to nonduality, which is the highest evolution of human to attain liberation. This verse is the continuation of the previous verse where Bhagwan had spoken on the importance of air (prana) for the sustenance of human life. He now continues stating that destruction of the world means transforming it into Vayu (prana). With destruction of the world he is referring to the destruction of duality and not the physical destruction of the tangible world. When the seeker purifies and depends less on physical matter and more on the subtle prana, he is getting transformed into light, into nondual existence, thus losing his perception of maya (illusion) expressed in the duality of the world. Everything loses its dual nature and converts into oneness for him when he transforms his existence into air (prana) and that is why he says “Destruction of the world is transforming it into Vayu (prana).

He then says Raja Yoga (the Royal path) is the means of attaining this. Raja Yoga is the place of indivisible Monism (Oneness). He then says, when you enter into Oneness, the many (duality) will disappear on it’s own for the seeker.

What is Raja Yoga?

Raja means “king”. Raja Yoga is referred to thus the Royal Path or the highest path. Raja Yoga deals with meditation and breathwork, focussing more on the body and mind. Raja Yoga is also known as Ashtanga Yoga where “ashta” means “eight” – the 8 limbs taught by Maharishi Patanjali. It goes step-by-step to attain the state of self-realisation. The 8 steps are:

  1. Yama: Yama means restraints.• Ahimsa (non-violence): Non-voilence does not just mean refraining from injuring any being but also noninjury of any creature in thoughts, words or deeds.
     Satya (honesty, truthfulness): Refraining from from any kind of lying, manipulation, or deviation from the truth.
     Asteya (stealing, non-covetousness): Refraining from stealing anything that belongs to others and that which does not belong to you. Stealing means not just about stealing physical things, but also refraining from other subtle stealing like stealing others’ energy, ideas, time, space, privacy, etc.
     Aparigraha (non-greediness, non-covetousness): Refraining from greed of possessing that which belongs to others. It is greed that makes one desire or crave for something that one does not own or have, like viewing to covet other’s spouse, other’s wealth, other’s name and fame, other’s positions or status, other’s fortunes, etc. The desire to hoard, store, thinking about only one’s own existence is also also greed.
     Brahmacharya (continence, moderation in all sensual pleasures): Refraining from sensual activities by disciplining the senses through diet, Yoga and meditation. Brahmacharya means celebacy, but it essecially points out towards sublimation of lower desires into higher desires. When sexual energies are sublimated into higher passions like creativity, unconditional love, compassion, oneness.
  2. Niyama: Niyama means disciplines. Saucha (cleanliness): Cleanliness means keeping the body, mind and also the surroundings around a person clean. Practice of cleanliness strengthens the discipline of the body and mind.
     Santosha (contentment):  Being content with what life has to offer. Practicing contentment helps develop tolerance, patience, appreciation, happiness and peace.
     Tapas (austerity, self-discipline): Austerity is working on oneself on all levels – physical, mental and emotional through regular disciplines, routines, schedules like discipline of time in waking-sleeping, exercise, work, play, etc. Austerity is working on the meditational practices to achieve stability of the mind, body and emotions.
     Swadhyaya (study of the Self): Swadhyaya essentially means “self-study”, meaning studying and contemplating on oneself. It allows one to become more aware of oneself and thus educate, train, improve and monitor oneself better.
     Ishwarapranidhana (surrendering to Supreme/Personal God/Guru): It emphasising on doing one’s duty without expecting the fruits of that action but surrendering it to the highest. Highest can vary from person to person, like one’s highest submission could be towards the god, diety or guru that one believes in. Surrender means being neutral and accepting whatever happens as the will of the higher power because of the undersatnding that everything that is best for one may not be known or accepted easily by the ego. Hence, surrender to higher will makes a big difference in the seeker’s life,
  3. Asana: Asana means posture. Asana essentially means one’s ability to sit straight and steady without any back or side support, preferably in sukhasana, padmasana or vajrasana. The body is the biggest obstacle for meditation and hence establishing this discipline is training the body for meditation.
  4. Pranayama: Pranayama means disciplining of the prana.
    The prana is disciplined through the practice of pranayama or control of breath.  There are various  is attained through the  practice aims at controlling prana through control of the breath. Pranayama is breathwork and there are various practices from beginner level to highly advanced practices. It is essentially these practices that enhances prana in the practitioner and helps dissolving physical to subtle (that the current verse (33) of Chidakasha Gita speaks of.
  5. Pratyahara: Pratyahara means withdrawalPratyahara is withdrawing the senses from objects or withdrawing the mind from the senses. These are all steps of achievement. If all the earlier 4 steps are practiced and attained by the practitioner, Pratyahara becomes more naturally the state of the seeker, because by now, the seeker has now attained great purity through the Yamas and Niyamas, having the senses withdrawn, and achieved steadiness in posture, which helps prana regulate in the physical and etheric bodies.
  6. Dharana: Dharana means concentration.Dharana happens when the mind is withdrawn and can remain focused steadily on its object of concentration for any period of time that the seeker decides to. When one reaches this stage, one is able to easily manifest or materialise very easily anything the seeker desires. This is the stage where the aspirant needs to exercise more caution with the attainment of Siddhis and the tendency of falling for greed and illusion.
  7. Dhyana: Dhyana means meditation.When the mind becomes totally concentrated and steady, it becomes still and calm, and if this state is maintained undisturbed for about 2 minutes, the aspirant falls naturally into meditation. In such a state of meditation, the aspirant has no more awareness of space and time.  From here begins further levels of dissolution of the mind as it delves more into deeper meditative states.
  8. Samadhi: Samadhi means the transcendental state of nothingness.Samadhi is also called the Turiya state, the fourth state of consciousness, where the limitations of body, senses, mind, intellect and ego are transcended. (See verse 10 for details of the 4 states of consciousness). One is able to fall into the Turiya state when one is able to maintain dhyana  uninterrupted for about 30 minutes. In this state, the aspirant experiences the Self, the Atman. (see verses 7, 8, & 9).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 35

You must not leave the feet of a guru. Your mind should not flicker like the reflection of the sun in the shaking water.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that you must not leave the feet of a guru and the mind should not flicker like how the reflection of the sun flickers on the shaking water.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that one must not leave the feet of the guru and this is not meaning the physical feet. Being at the feet of the guru symbolises surrender. It is only when there is submission to the guru’s energies that the transmission of grace happens. Hence, one always remains surrendered to the guru without allowing the mind to flicker like how the sun’s reflection flickers on the shaking water. He is referring to “shaking” water, because it is easy for the reflection to stay still on still water but when the water gets shaky, the reflection also flickers. Shaky waters symbolises uneven or shaky times.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 36

The sea water is boundless; the tank water has a boundary. Our mind must be like the tank water. Mind is the cause of good and evil. A man may be good and bad according to his good or bad thoughts. God does not do good or evil to any man. The reason is, intelligence and knowledge are the divine faculties in man. A man protected by good thoughts, cannot be harmed even by a cannon shot. Without yoga, liberation from karma is impossible.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the sea water is boundless but the tank water has a boundary. Our mind must be like the tank water because mind is the cause of all good and bad thoughts. God does not do good or bad to man but a man becomes good or bad according to his thoughts because the divine faculties of intelligence and knowledge exist  in man. A man who is protected by good thoughts cannot be harmed even by a cannon shot. Without yoga, liberation from karma is impossible.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that one’s mind must be kept in control with proper boundaries defined for it, just like the tank water that is bound by the container within its boundary, and not like the sea water that is boundless. He says that mind is the cause of all good and bad, due to which karma is created. Thus, how good or bad a man is depends on how good or bad his thoughts are. Man attracts good and bad consequences according to this own thoughts and god has nothing to do with it. God neither does good nor bad to man, because man already has the divine faculties of intelligence and knowledge within him, which are his tools for knowing and choosing between good and bad. Bhagwan says that a man who is nourishes good thoughts is always protected and cannot be harmed even by a cannot shot. He says for that that liberation from karma is needed and without yoga liberation from karma is impossible.

It is important to note that “yoga” does not mean yogasanas, but he is referring to Raja Yoga (for more details on yoga, please refer verse 33).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 37

Without knowing the secret (truth), if we simply decorate the exterior skin, our karma will not leave us; one cannot be a Sanyasi by external signs if he is internally a hypocrite. What you think, you must speak; what you speak, you must show by your acts. Do what you say; say what you do. Such a man is a Jnani; he is a Paramahansa; he is a Yogi; he is a Sanyasi. One who has conquered desire is a true Sanyasi. Only a desireless man is fit to be a spiritual teacher.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that without knowing the secret (reality), if we simply decorate our bodies, karma is not going to leave us. One cannot be a Sanyasi (Sanyasi) by external appearance if internally he is a hypocrite. You must speak what you think and also show it in your acts. You must do what you say and say what you do. Only such a person is a Jnani (enlightened), he is a Paramahansa (liberated), he is a Yogi (aspirant), he is a Sanyasi (ascetic). Only the one who has conquered desire is a true Sanyasi. Only such a desireless man is fit to be a spiritual teacher.

Additional Notes

In this verse, Bhagwan talks deeply about the reality of who actually can be called a spiritual teacher. He says that without knowing the truth of this matter, if one just decorates their skin, karma is not going to leave them. Skin decorations means all the external decorations done on the body like with chola (attire/garb), mala (beads/rosary/lockets), vibhuti (sacred ash/vermilion), daadi (beard), jata (dreadlocks), kundal (earrings/ bracelets), paduka (footwear).  He says one cannot become a Sanyasi (renunciate) just by changing external appearance but internally remaining a hypocrite.

For that, Bhagwan points out the importance of being very honest and transparent by speaking exactly what you think and whatever one speaks must reflect in their actions too. For that he says, do what you say and say what you do. Such a person, Bhagwan defines as the real Jnani (enlightened), the real Paramahansa (liberated), the real Yogi (aspirant), the real Sanyasi (ascetic). He is pointing to the fact that all hypocrisy comes from the subtle hidden desires, which is why he says that only the one who has conquered desires is a true Sanyasi (ascetic) and that only such a desireless person is fit to be a spiritual teacher. The eligibility of this is emphasized, because if even the smallest desire remains, even the best of teachings of the spiritual teacher will have the impurity of some selfish motive, and thus such a service cannot be of the highest and purest. Whereas the one who is desireless, will have absolutely zero percentage of any selfish motive and thus render purely selfless service, which will automatically render the purest wisdom and energies for the highest good of the world.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 38

What is served for others, should not be eaten by us. We must place a separate leaf for us and eat our food.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says the food that is served for others, must not be eaten by us. We must instead take a separate leaf (plate) for ourselves and eat that food.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan refers food to spiritual wisdom or experiences. He says that whatever is served for everyone generally, may not serve individual purpose. What is written, spoken, given as spiritual wisdom generally to all (through books, preachings or any such mediums) must not be one’s food. It is as good as eating what was served for others or belonging to others. So not all spiritual wisdom provided to the world needs to be eaten (received) by us. He says we must rather place a separate leaf (in olden days banana leafs were the food plates) for ourselves and eat our food from it, meaning we must practice the wisdom and experience it ourselves. When you place your own leaf, you will only take what you can consume, digest and experience it wholly also. In other words, not everything that you see as spiritual wisdom out there is needed for you. One must known what is best suited for oneself and individually strive for that. In other words it also relates to the fact that what is served for someone is meant to be for them and thus one must not eat from what was meant for others. It is directly speaking about “astheya” from the Raja Yoga (Ashtanga Yoga) that Bhagwan mentions in verse 33, which clearly defines not viewing or desiring that which belongs to others or is meant for others.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 39

There is nothing like “this one” has more and another has less. The power of thought, the ears, the nose, the hand, the eye, etc. are the same to all.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that in reality there is nothing that one has more and another has less. The power of the thought, ears, nose, hand, eye, etc is similar in everyone.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that everyone has been equally gifted with the power of thinking, discriminating, choosing, deciding, creating, through various sense organs and physical organs of the body. Thus, there is nothing like someone has more and someone has less, because all are equally blessed with the same gifts to get through the journey of life. The Supreme does not discriminate anyone as higher or lower and all are given support and opportunities equally. Hence, one cannot cannot use the excuse that someone is more blessed than them. All are equally blessed; it is all about how one takes individual responsibility and utilises their gifts.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 40

The nose is not the place where the eye is. Walking should be done by the legs only. Work done by the hands cannot be done by the head.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the nose is not in the place of the eyes. Walking can be done with the use of legs only. Similarly, work can be done by hands only and not the head.

Additional Notes

This is a continuation of the previous verse, where Bhagwan had mentioned how everyone is blessed equally. In this verse he continues saying that everything in the cosmos is created very purposely and nothing is disorganised. He refers to how the nose cannot be where the eyes are and how walking can be done by the legs alone  and how head cannot be used for doing a work but only hands have to be used. Similarly, everything has it’s purpose in creation and hence all the tools needs to be rightly discriminated and utilised appropriately.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 41

“The head is the ocean of ananda (bliss). In it is situated the Prana Linga, i.e., the seat of liberation (Mukti). This cannot be learnt from books. It is inherent in the brain. The book consists of parts, but Jnana is the indivisible one. A book consists of chapters, but Jnana is single chaptered. For those who have not realised, a book is necessary; but to a man of realisation, there is only one undivided being. When a man takes birth, he is not born with a book in his hand but he is born with a brain. While coming (to this world) and going away (from this world), a man has no book in his hand. Only in the middle period he takes a book.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the head is the ocean of bliss, where is situated the prana linga, which is the seat of liberation. This cannot be learnt from books as it is inherent in the brain. The book consists of various parts but the wisdom is always undivided. A book consists of chapters but wisdom is a single chapter. A book is necessary only those those who have not realised but to the one who has realised the Self, he is not born with a book in his hand but he is born with a brain. While coming and going into this world, man has no book in his hand, but only in the middle period he takes a book.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan in this verse talks about the wisdom gained from external sources, like books, and the wisdom gained from the inner Source. He says, that the head is the ocean of bliss. He is pointing to the Sahasrar. When the Kundalini shakti reaches the Sahasrar and remains there, there is an explosion of bliss, which is why this place is referred to as the ‘ocean of ananda (bliss)’. This is the place which is considered to be the seat of Prana Linga, which is the seat of liberation.  Bhagwan then says that this can be only and only experienced and never learnt from books, meaning this true wisdom is received from the inner source and not from external sources, because this wisdom is inherent in the brain. He says books consists of various parts, meaning they are all fragmented, but jnana (true wisdom) is indivisible. A book  consists of parts but true wisdom is one whole chapter. Such books are needed only for the one who has not yet realised the Self but to the one who has realised their Self, there is only one whole undivided nondual being experienced, whose source of wisdom is also from that Source that he has become one with. Bhagwan then says that when a man is born he is born not with a book in his hand but with a brain, emphasising that this is the brain (sahasrar) is the true source of wisdom that the man should be relying and not the artificial source of wisdom from a book. Also that while coming (birth) and going (death) from this world, man has no book in his hand, meaning at the time of birth and at the time of death, books will not help, but what man has truly experienced. So, not at birth or at death, but man picks up books during his lifetime. This points in clarity that man depends on books only when he is not yet aware and thus unable to turn towards the true wisdom by activating the Prana Linga by reaching the prana to the sahasrar through practice.

The whole verse simply points to the fact that books are somebody else’s limited wisdom, written through the limited dimensions of the mind and intellect, which need not be the purest and which can never become the reader’s experience, but that wisdom which is the true reliable wisdom is that of one’s own experience, which comes from one’s inner Source, and this is the Inner Source is that indivisible Source of Creation itself, from where the Vedas were known to be born from. Bhagwan in this verse points depending on this Source.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 42

When a man is born, he is perfect; when he goes away then also, he is perfect. In the middle, he is subject to Maya. That which pervades in all directions is ONE, indivisible; that which is limited, is divisible.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when a man is born and when a man dies, he is perfect but only in the middle (life) he is subject to maya (illusion). That which is spread in all directions is limitless and indivisible but that which is limited is divisible.

Additional Notes

This is a continuation to the previous verse where Bhagwan had indicated that when a man comes into this world and goes out of this world he does not need a book but it is only in between, during his life, he needs a book. Book represents external wisdom and dependence on external sources. Similarly, in this verse he continues saying that when a man is born or when he dies, he is perfect but only in the middle (during life) is he subject to Maya (illusion). Birth and death are two moments in humans when the consciousness is activated to its full reality, when man experiences his true self. During these moments he is fully aware and conscious of his true identity and is not subject to anything illusory in the world that he is going to be born into or the world that he is leaving. At these moments of birth and death, he neither is dependant on external sources, as his consciousness is turned within and these are the moments he is aligned with the ultimate truth.

What does it mean that man is “perfect” at birth and death?

A child, when born, is completely aware of who it is, as the memories of it’s soul journey till there is completely active, for it is in the pure state of soul consciousness. The soul of the child is aware of who it was in the past life and what agenda it has to fulfil in this lifetime. As the child enters into the illusory world which is far away from the supreme truth, it gradually begins losing hold of its true state and gets more adapted to the illusory world, that it itself chose to experience based on it’s desires. That is how a child, who was at birth experiencing a perfect, limitless, nondual state of consciousness, now when subject to a limited world of duality, begins experiencing dual moments of confusion, surprises, fear, joy, sadness, etc and the child reacts in laughter, cry, agony, fear, surprise, etc. From here, begins it’s journey into maya and slowly it loses awareness of it’s true state and becomes more attuned with the illusions (maya) of the world, as the world begins slowly training the child into a different dual, limited world. From here till death is what Bhagwan is referring to as “middle” phase, in both this and previous verse.

Next, at the time of death, the soul begins remembering back who it really is. Science reveals that man loses consciousness just before death. This is actually the moment when the soul consciousness has turned within and he becomes fully aware of who he really is, the pure soul. These moments are today known to be the 20-sec interval, when just at the moment of death, the whole major life incidents of the person flashes in front of him for 20 seconds very rapidly, but his awareness is able to grasp everything in great details. In this time interval, all those most important aspects of his soul agenda of this life journey flashes before him, showing him what his reality was and what he was supposed to have done with this life and what did he actually do. This is the window period when the soul realises what it achieved or missed due to its entanglement in the illusion of life. The soul thus leaves in full awareness, carrying forth the awareness of how these pending things would be cleared in the forthcoming journey.  These are the moments where the soul is devoid of any illusion and has full clarity of what his pure state of being is, thus it is able to observe and learn everything truly in a pure state of consciousness. It is fully aware of it’s state of oneness with the supreme and universal consciousness. So, this period at the time  of birth and death are the states of consciousness that Bhagwan is referring to as “perfect” state, which is why he says “man is perfect at the time of birth and death”. 

Further, this perfect state is what he is referring to as “all that pervades in all directions is ONE” meaning the individual soul consciousness that is one with Supreme consciousness, infinite, in all directions, omnipresent, limitless and indivisible. This is the real state of who you are. Whatever is separate from this reality is limited and divisible, and that is Maya (illusion).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 43

At the place where there is running water, there can be no mud; the place is quite clean. Ignorance (ajnana) is mud; the current of water is Bhakti and Jnana.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that at the place where there is running water, there can be no mud and the place is quite clean.  He says ignorance (ajnana) is the mud and bhakti and jnana is the current of water.

Additional Notes

Continuing from the previous verse where Bhagwan had mentioned that only at the time of birth and at the time of death does man be in his perfect state of union with the supreme truth (jnana) of it’s real state of pure awareness, he mentioned that it is during life when the soul is entangled in maya that it remains in ajnana (ignorance). In this verse, he continues telling how this ignorance can be removed. He says that where there is running water, there cannot be mud. Mud he refers to as the ignorance. Mud cannot stay there because it gets washed away in the flow of the running water. The current of the running water is what he refers to as bhakti (devotion) and jnana (true wisdom). So, Bhagwan says that ignorance can be removed with devotion, faith and aligning with the true wisdom. With devotion he means Universal Love, which can be seen elaborated in the next verse.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 44

It is not Bhakti to give a man some money or to give him a meal as charity. Bhakti is universal love. Seeing God, in all beings, without the least idea of duality, is Bhakti.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says it is not bhakti (devotion) to give man some money or to give him a meal as charity. The real bhakti is universal love. Seeing god in every being without the least idea of duality is bhakti.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan gives a completely new meaning to what we normally believe bhakti to be. Normally, bhakti means devotion to god or guru or ishta. It is worshiping and respecting that element of god in any element that the worshipper has faith in. Like, a seeker may be moved in devotion when he sees god in guru, sees god in an animal, sees god in a tree, sees god in an idol, sees god in parents, etc. Out of this bhakti, he will have reverence, love and affinity for them out of which he will do something for them. A spiritual seeker may be moved with compassion seeing a beggar or a person needing help and thus he might do some charity, trying to help him with some food or money. But Bhagwan says bhakti is not giving man some money or a meal as charity. The real bhakti is universal love. Seeing god not just selectively, but seeing god in every being (all species) without having even the least bit of discrimination of duality – is true devotion.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 45

Without the control of breath (pranayama), a man cannot be a yogi (a perfected being); nor is he a Sanyasi (ascetic). Without a rudder, it is impossible to steer a boat or ship.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that without the control of breath (pranayama), a man cannot be a yogi or a sanyasi. It is impossible to steer a boat or a ship without rudder.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan reveals in this verse how important the mastery in breathwork is. The Chidakasha Gita emphasises on breathwork very deeply and it can be studied in depth from previous verses as in verse 6, 10, 11, 12, 20, 32 & 33.

This is why Bhagwan says, without mastery in breathwork, one cannot be a Yogi (perfected being) or a Sanyasi (ascetic) because breath is what controls the mind as well as purifies it. He says that just as how impossible is it to steer a boat or ship without a rudder, is it also impossible for one to steer oneself towards liberation without mastery of breath.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 46

To a good man, every man is good; everything is good. A man can be good by his own exertion.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says to a good person, every person is good and everything is good. A man can be good by his own perception of things.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan points to the truth that everything outside is nothing but a reflection of one’s inner state of consciousness. To a good man, every person or thing outside will look good. For his everything around will be in perfect order and perfect beauty, out of which there will be total acceptance of everyone and everything the way they are. Similarly, to an evil man, every person will seem evil, everything situation or thing will seem evil. To a negative person everyone and everything and every situation will seem negative and to a positive man everyone, everything and all situations will look positive and favourable. If a man wears red glasses, the whole world will seem red to him. So in simple words it means that man does not perceive things in its actuality but he perceives it exactly as he is. That is why Bhagwan says that everything depends on how a man exerts himself or how he makes an attempt to see things and his experience and reality will be exactly the way he exerts himself.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 47

We drink the juice of the sugarcane and throw away the refuse. Similarly, this body is a house for the Atman. When it is spoiled, we build a new one.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just we drink the juice of sugarcane and throw away the refuse. In the same way, the body also is a home for the soul and so, when body spoils, we build a new one.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that the human body is only a home for the soul. Meaning, you (the soul) reside in your body. Just as when the house get damaged, a new house is built, a body when it falls apart, the soul takes another birth and creates another body. The soul, from the womb state, begins creating another home (body), based on it’s conditionings, pending desires, samskaras (psychic impressions), vasanas (tendencies), and the overall pending karmic dues.

Bhagwan refers this act with the process as simple and natural as using a sugarcane. After drinking the sugarcane juice, the refuse is useless and hence thrown away. Similarly, after the soul leaving the body, the body becomes useless and needs to be given up for cremation.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 48

It is the nest that perishes; not the bird. The nest is built of earth. The blood vessels and nadis are earth. In the blood vessels are the blood and semen. This body made of flesh is subject to death. If it is not washed for a single day, it stinks; we cannot trust the human body.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that it is the nest that perishes and not the bird. The nest is built from earth. The blood vessels and nadis are earth, in the blood vessels are the blood and semen. This body that is made of flesh is subject to death always. If the body is not washed for a single day, it stinks; the human body cannot be trusted.

Additional Notes

Continuing from the previous verse, where Bhagwan had talked of how the soul lives in the body and leaves when the body falls apart, to create another body, in this verse Bhagwan continues stating that it is the nest that perishes and not the bird. Meaning, it is the body that perishes and not the soul.  Just like the nest is built of earth, the blood vessels are nadis are from the earth (pritvi tatva or earth element).  In the blood vessels are the blood and semen (from jala tatva or water element). Bhagwan says such is the construction of the body which is made up of flesh that is subject to decay, that if the body if not washed for a single day would begin to stink. So, Bhagwan says that such an impermanent, destructive human body cannot be trusted.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 49

Mind is the creator of ideas. When the gross ideas are suppressed and the man lives in the subtle, this state is called “Nirvikalpa Samadhi” or Samadhi without ideas. Just as we teach a bird how to talk, keeping it in a cage with its feet bound, we must keep our mind in our buddhi. A man must learn for himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that mind is the creator of ideas. “Nirvikalpa Samadhi or samadhi without ideas is when the gross ideas are suppressed and the man lives in the subtle. Our mind must be kept in our buddhi (intellect) just as we teach a bird how to talk by keeping it in a cage with its feet bound. A man must learn for himself.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that it is from the mind that all ideas (thoughts) are created. Till there are thoughts, there cannot be samadhi because samadhi or nirvikalpa samadhi is a state without any thought. It is the state where all the gross ideas are suppressed as soon as one moves from the gross to subtle state, through meditation. The mind must be trained to be always bound within the buddhi (intellect) just like how a bird is trained in a cage with its feet bound. Man must learn for himself by training the intellect.

What is  Nirvikalpa Samadhi?

Bhagwan often in Chidakasha Gita keeps referring to Raja Yoga. According to Raja Yoga of Maharishi Patanjali, there are five kind of thoughts (vrittis)pramana, viparyaya, vikalpa, nidra, smriti. For this verse, we will only focus on Vikalpa Vritti.

The Vikalpa Vritti  is imagination. Maya creates havoc through this Vikalpa Vritti. There is always fear and  worry with this vikalpa vritti. For example, a rumour breaks out that a certain virus has affected a certain city. It is not even true but just a rumour. Now, a man who hears this rumour begins imagining (this is Vikalpa)  falsely about himself being affected by the virus. Out of that constant worrying and fear through this Vikalpa, he actually manifests the virus . Another example is that you suddenly meet your friend on the street and he just smiles and rushes off without talking to you, as he in great hurry not to miss his train. Now, you imagine falsely (vikalpa) that he is offended. From that one vilakpa a chain of wrong thoughts follows, ending you up in wrong conclusions and creating great havoc out of nothing. This way, the mind is constantly generating thoughts and followed by vikalpas with every thought. These false fantasies or imaginations are called vikalpas.  The way of not identifying  with these vikalpas is through vichara (reflection or contemplation), which is where the role of buddhi (intellect) plays a major role, that Bhagwan is referring to. In this verse, he says that mind constantly creates vrittis (thoughts) from which vikalpas (false imagination) are formed.  This is gross living, and he says one must move from this gross state (vikalpas) to subtle state (vikalpa-less state), which is when it becomes nir-vikalpa. When one enters into nir-vikalpa state one enters into the state of samadhi, which is why it is known as nirvikapa samadhi.

But for one to move from gross to subtle Bhagwan says, the mind must be kept under the control of Buddhi (intellect). This is why most of the verses of Chidakasha Gita keeps pointing towards Buddhi. (Detailed explainations on buddhi can be studied in verse 16, 22, 23 & 26). He thus says, that just like how a bird is trained by keeping it confined in a cage, the wandering mind also must not be allowed to fly off and be kept constrained under the buddhi (intellect) and trained. He ends this verse saying that this is how man must learn for himself.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 50

Holding the nose with the hand, with eyes turned upwards and holding the breath in tight as if winding a clock spring with a key are similar to circus feats or a cinema show -these are not what is called “Samadhi“.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that holding the nose with one hand with eyes turned upwards and holding the breath tight as if winding the clock spring with a key, is something that is similar to a circus feat or like a cinema show and this is not samadhi.

Additional Notes

Referring to the previous verse where Bhagwan had made it clear as to what is nirvikalpa samadhi, he continues in this verse to reveal that what the world influenced by yoga calls as samadhi is not the real samadhi. He refers to a practitioner doing a yoga mudra of holding the nose with one hand with the eyes turned upwards, simultaneously holding the breath tight like how a clock spring is wound tight by a key. He calls this act more of a circus feat or some movie stunt but not samadhi. Samadhi is the state of uninterrupted bliss with total absence of dualities and complete absence of any thoughts, emotions,  cravings, desires, sensory pleasures, imaginary pleasures or body consciousness. Hence, one must be careful to not fall into any delusory or fascinating traps of hoping for samadhi through any such tactics.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 51

The sense of equality is the greatest thing in this world. People go mad after shadows; very few are mad after the invisible (the subtle). True madness is very rare, it being found only in one among a lakh or two. Other people run mad after sixteen things in a ghatika (twenty-four minutes). “I want this”, “I want that”, “This is different”, “That is different”, such is their mad talk. Entertaining various motives is madness. Fickleness of mind is madness. Greatness is madness. Practicing and seeing the reality is the opposite kind of madness. Liberation from birth and death is divine madness. Those who have not realised the truth are mad after the gross. Everyone has one sort of madness or another. Thousands of people possess houses, diamond-jewels, gold and property. They did not bring these with them at birth nor will they take these with them at death.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan shakes up human consciousness with one of the most neglected or ignored truth by humans in the journey of life. This truth evades easily because of the power of maya (illusion) that doesn’t easily allow one to see through the truth. (Read about maya in verse 7 & 42).

Bhagwan says that the sense of equality is the greatest quality in this world. Avadhootas gold and dust are equal (see verses 13 & 17). He says people run madly after shadows (that which is false and unreal) and very few are mad behind the real (invisible). He says true madness is very rare and is found only in a handful of people, like one among a lakh or two. He says other people madly run behind 16 different things every ghatika (During ancient times, some people used sundial to track time while others used water clock. Indians called this water clock Ghatika.) So, with the term ghatika, he is simply saying “every hour” or simply “all the time”. The mad run is with the never-ending desires of ‘I want this’ and ‘I want that’. He says their mad talk is like – ‘this is different’ or ‘that is different’ meaning the mind’s unending craving of seeking something different all the time. Entertaining all such multiple motives of the mind he calls as madness because the fickleness of the mind is madness. Running behind greatness is madness. Whereas practicing to see reality through all this this illusion is the opposite of madness. True divine madness is seeking liberation from birth and death. Those who have not realised this truth are mad after the gross (worldly desires). He says everyone has one or the other sort of madness. Thousands of people possess houses, diamond-jewels, gold and property but they fail to break through the illusion and realise the ultimate truth that they did not bring all these with them at birth nor will they take these with them after death.

Additional Notes

What is Maya?

Maya is defined as the illusion that makes everything look real. The whole of creation is just a projection of the divine and that is why it is called as the play of consciousness. Many religions state maya to be a play of god. Many refer to the whole existence as a mere play of entertainment, for nothing in this existence is permanent other that the Supreme being in which the whole play of cosmos is being projected. The whole cosmos is only an infinite canvas upon which the film of cosmic drama is being projected. In this cosmic drama there are endless actors, none permanent, that keep coming and going playing different roles. Drama begins when the being wants to experience itself and thus explodes into particles of light. Each particle begins to have its own identity. Reality is that we are sparks of that Supreme being that chose to play roles in this cosmic drama for the desire of experiencing oneself. In that pursuit of wanting to experience oneself, each spark got separated from the Supreme consciousnesses but eventually got more and more far away from the supreme reality because they eventually took the whole drama as serious.  As one goes farther it begins losing its memory of its real identity and begins assuming its own identity as real. This is called as the false “I” which is formed from the ego. The ego is what separates reality and ego is what makes one more strongly rooted in illusion. Ego is false I. False I is ego. The stronger the ego, the stronger the illusions and the stronger the impacts of the worldly delusions. 

The ego begins to seriously assume its existence as permanent, and in that pursuit man kept adding on more and more desires in a deep desire to seek fulfilment. What the soul seeks is actually a permanent reunion with the True Source, from which it got separated but since the seeking is outwardly it finds itself stuck in everything that is outward and impermanent. The soul seeks this lasting happiness by the wrong feeling of being fulfilled with every desire, only to find that the desire has only increased. This is what Bhagwan is referring to as madness. Whereas, those who have been awakened to the truth of who they are (which was Bhagwan’s main purpose of coming to earth for) now also have a seeking and a desire, but the seeking is inward now and the desire is for liberation from the misery of the cycle of birth and death. This madness is what Bhagwan refers to as divine madness. The play of maya is very strong and deceiving and this is the reason even after man knowing the truth find easily lured by maya.

All great Mahatmas and Avataras have time and again come and gone only for this very purpose of planting the seed of divine madness of liberation into the human minds and souls. They keep constantly reminding that man is not what they have assumed themselves to be. They remind that ‘” am not this body nor I am this soul” but “I am That I am” where ‘That I am’ refers to the One Supreme Being that is without birth and without death and exists as pure awareness infinitely. They remind this by showing their own true examples where they remain established in their true self, thus encouraging man to use time and human life to fruitfully achieve this.

This is why Bhagwan is referred to as Bhagwan (god) because he had established that state of godhood, which made him as powerful as the Creator himself, which he demonstrated throughout his whole life. That state of godhood is pure awareness of uninterrupted eternal bliss, meaning ‘Nithyananda’. 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 52

It is not the body that exists nor disappears. He is the ONE who is the supreme doer. It is the breath that man brings here at birth and it is the breath that man takes with him when he leaves this world. Property and fame are here only. There, everything is one. Duality exists here only. On the other side, there is no duality. A perfect man (Avadhoota) is the greatest of men. Yogis and Sanyasi want some Siddhi, i.e., power acquired through yoga or tapas. An Avadhoota does not want anything.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that is is not the body that exists or disappears as the body is only a temporary vehicle of the soul. With body comes in body consciousness and with body consciousness comes in the ego and with ego comes in the false identity of “I am this body” which generally expresses itself as “I am so-and-so”. and it is with this identity that comes the illusory feeling “I am the doer.” Bhagwan says that we are not the doer but He (supreme creator) is the one who is the supreme doer. Man only brings with himself breath at the time of birth and the only thing that he takes with him at the time of death is breath. So breath is his only true possession. Property and fame are all only things of this world, which one day he has to leave behind. He says that all this duality exists only here in this dual world but on the other side (higher realms) everything is one, and is nondual. The one who realises in his experience and being while being in the human body is the perfect man, whom Bhagwan calls as the greatest of men. The Avadhootas are such perfected humans. He also cautions that he is not referring to Yogis and Sanyasis who are desirous of some siddhi or power through yoga or austerity, but he is actually referring these perfected beings to the Avadhootas, who has no need of anything, because he has transcended all desires of dualities and is now established every moment in the state of godhood – in supreme love, completeness and eternal bliss – the state of Nithyananda.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 53

When SAT unites with CHIT, Ananda (bliss) is the result. This Ananda is Paramananda, Sri Satchidananda. Paramananda is experienced in the head. In the head is in the Brahma-nadi. Brahmananda is Paramananda.
Jeeva enjoys this bliss when he is one with Paramatman. This bliss is also called Shivananda. Paramananda is experienced in the head. This state is eternal joy.
This state is Jeevan-Mukti.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when Sat unites with Chit, Ananda is the result. Sat means “eternal truth” which is referred to the eternal infinite being, the eternal immortal being. Chit means mind (the mind without memory). Ananda means eternal bliss. So Bhagwan is saying that when when eternal truth or the infinite being unites with your awareness or your consciousness, the result is eternal bliss (ananda).  In other words, when your awareness becomes fully conscious or aware of the eternal being (that you may call god or supreme or infinite) , both have merged, which results in the state of eternal bliss. Bhagwan says this eternal bliss is Parmananda or Sri SatchidanandaParam means highest or supreme, so paramananda highest bliss. Satchitananda is the state of eternal conscious bliss. Bhagwan says that this paramananda is experienced in the head. (see verse 2, 40, 41 where Bhagwan talks about the ‘head’). In the head is the Brahma Nadi. Brahma Nadi is nothing but the  Sushumna Nadi (see more details on Sushumna Nadi in verse 2) This main Brahma Nadi is referred to as the Brahma (Creator). Brahmananda (supreme bliss) is Parmananda  (highest bliss). Bhagwan says Jeeva (individual soul) enjoys this bliss when he is united with the Parmatman (god or supreme). He says this bliss is also called Shivananda (shiva means supreme). Bhagwan then says this state is eternal joy and this is the liberated state.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 54

He is a Jnani who has given up worldly pleasures and by practicing yoga, seen god. Ananda (bliss) is not in what you hear. Bliss is a matter of experience. Such a man is called a Mahatma. Those who have seen earthen and stone images do not become Mahatmas. He is a Mahatma who knows himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says he is a jnani (liberated one) who has given up worldly pleasures and by practicing yoga (Raj Yoga) has seen god. He further says that Ananda (bliss) is not in what you hear but bliss is a matter of experience. Meaning, just like one cannot explain the taste of sweetness nor can one who hears about it know what is sweetness, similarly such is also what ananda (bliss) is; it has to be tasted and has to be experienced to be known. One needs to actually taste sugarcane or jaggery to know and experience what sweetness it. Even the person who has tasted sweetness cannot explain it unless the listener tastes it himself.  Bhagwan says such a man, who has tasted bliss, is a Mahatma. Those who have seen earthen and stone images do not become Mahatmas. Meaning, just by darshans (seeing) of stone or clay idols or images one cannot become a Mahatma. Only he is a Mahatma who knows himself. Meaning, the one who instead of seeing god in idols but has seen it within himself, having known and experienced his true identity by experiencing his true Self through Self-realisation – only he is a Mahatma.

Additional Notes

See more references of Jnani in verses 1, 13, 14, 25 & 37

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 55

“An Avadhoota has conquered death and birth. He has no consciousness of the body, an Avadhoota has gone beyond all Gunas (qualities). He is the knower of the “Omniscient Light”. He has no consciousness of the “I”. Such is a Raja Yogi, not a Hatha Yogi. When he comes to a village, he feels glad, whomsoever he may see. He has no consciousness of duality though he moves here and there. He has no hunger. He eats plentifully if he gets plenty of eatables. If he does not get, he will not ask anybody. Those who give to him poison and those who give to him milk are the same to him. Those who beat him and those who love him are the same to him. To an Avadhoota, the universe is the father, the mother, and the relation. He becomes the universe and the universe becomes he. The universe is merged in him.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse talks about who is an Avadhoota. He says an Avadhoota is the one who has conquered birth and death because now he is free from the cycle of birth and death. An Avadhoota has no body consciousness because he has transcended all the gunas. He is the knower of the omniscient light. He has no “I” consciousness, meaning he has no “I” ness, which comes out of false perception of the false “I” only when one is rooted in maya and duality, thus believing that whatever perception he carries about himself in this world as true. An Avadhoota loses this false identity completely for now he is merged with the Omniscient Supreme and experienced that omniscient light. Bhagwan says such a one is a Raj Yogi and not a Hatha Yogi. Hatha yogi is the one who forcefully (hatha means force) bends and twists his body in Yoga without emphasising on the subtle and other deeper aspects of Raja Yoga.

Bhagwan says when such an omniscient being comes to a village, he is happy to see anyone and everyone without any barriers or personal choice. Though he moves here and there, he has no awareness of even the least fraction of duality, which otherwise would separate himself from others. He is free from hunger. He will eat plentifully if he is given eatables and if not given he will not ask for anything. This is a clear indication of him not having an independent will and he moves with the supreme will. The nondual state is to such perfection that he finds no difference in even those who bring poison to him or those who bring milk to him. For him both of them are same. To an Avadhoota the Universe is his father, mother and all relations. An Avadhoota has now become one with the Universe – he becomes the Universe and the Universe becomes he. To such a one, there are no personal family relations – there is no father, mother, son, daughter, wife, husband, brother, sister and all such worldly relations. He is no more identified with a personal family but the whole Universe has become his family (Vasudaiva Kutumbakam).  The whole Universe is merged in him and he is merged in the whole Universe – the perfect state of Oneness, the state of omniscience and omnipresence, the state of the Supreme itself.

Additional Notes

What is the meaning of “Avadhoota has conquered birth and death”

The Avadhoota has transcended the karmic ties that keeps one bound to the cycle of birth and death. He is now free from it and has thus conquered over birth and death. For us birth means being born in some form and death means end of that physical form. For an Avadhoota this has no meaning because now since he has conquered birth and death, he chooses to be born if he wishes to or chooses to leave his body if he wishes to. Now, no aspects of karma or nature can influence his birth or death.

What is the meaning of “Avadhoota has gone beyond all gunas”

Guna means tattva or a quality or an element or an attribute or a virtue.The gunas are present in every human which are primarily responsible for one’s traits, actions and modes of behaviors and they greatly influence the life of every human. The 3 gunas are: 1. Sattva 2. Rajas 3. Tamas

The gunas are born from Prakriti (nature). The Self (individual soul) does not reside in the gunas but the gunas reside in the Self. Before creation,  the gunas remain inactive and in a state of perfect balance in the Moola Prakriti (Primordial Nature). When their balance is disturbed, creation gets set into motion, and the beings comes into existence, each possessing the 3 gunas in different proportions. The gunas are responsible for the duality or diversity of nature, and this gives birth to reality and unreality (maya). When the gunas are manifested in creation, the individual souls come under their influence and begin their outward journey into the world of matter and death.

The beings having more of sattva belong to the higher worlds. Beings having more of tamas belong to the lower worlds, and those with predominance of rajas belong to the middle worlds. In humans, all the three gunas are present in different degrees according to their spiritual purity and progress. Those with qualities of hate, crime, and other lowly animalistic or evil tendencies possess the predominance of tamas. Those pious people abiding by dharma (righteousness)  possess the predominance of sattva and the worldly people who are driven by selfish desires possess the predominance of rajas.

Actually, no gunas are good or bad and they are just the 3 qualities needed for a dual world and they are all fine when each guna is in balanced quantity. Every human is every moment affected by the 3 gunas and they can keep fluctuating in their quality of life depending on what they do become aware and act to bring changes in the qualities of the gunas. For example when you feel lazy, dull, inert, or grounded it is tamas; when you feel energetic, rushed, all-over-the-place, or full of attachment it is rajas; when you feel serene, calm, and balanced it is sattva.

The qualities of the 3 gunas:

Tamas: Increases with tamasic foods like meat, chemically-treated, processed, refined, junk food, fast food, bakery food,  overnight food, meat, alcohol, tobacco, fermented foods such as vinegar and stale overripe substances, etc. Other tamasic qualities are laziness, disgust, attachment, depression, helplessness, doubt, guilt, shame, boredom, addiction, hurt, sadness, apathy, confusion, grief, dependency, ignorance.

Rajas: Increases with rajasic foods like fried, spicy, very hot, bitter, sour, dry, salty, sharp spices or strong herbs, onions and garlic, stimulants such as coffee and teas, fish, poultry, eggs, salt, chocolate, etc. Other rajasic qualities are , over-exercising, overwork, loud music, excessive thinking, use of excessive material goods.

Sattva: Increases with reduction of rajas and tamas qualities and with consumption of sattvic foods like grains, legumes, cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables, pure fruit juices, milk, butter and cheese, nuts, seeds, honey, herb teas, etc. Other satvic qualities are yoga, meditation, being in activities and environments that produce joy, positive and divine thoughts.

Guna-athitha: The path of spirituality is all about transcending these gunas. Normally, one begins by moving or making choices towards more of the sattva qualities and reducing the qualities of rajas and tamas. Thus, a Yogi moves towards the pure qualities of sattva. But, it is important to understand that even thought sattva is pure, it is still a quality and can still keep a soul bound in the cycle of birth and death. To get liberated from the cycle of birth and death (moksha) one has to transcend all the 3 gunas, which is a state called as guna-atitah).

An Avadhoota is one who has transcended all gunas. When one overcomes the 3 gunas, he has no affinity towards likes nor dislikes, purity or impurity, passion or sainthood. It makes no difference to him even if they present or absent. He neither looks forward to anything nor detests anything. He thus remains indifferent to pleasure and pain, pleasant and unpleasant, criticism or praise, honor or dishonor, friend or enemy, gold or clay. He does not show any favour on any particular quality or person or thing nor is against anything in existence. He just is a pure witness, the observer, infinite, for he has now become one with the Supreme Creator.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 56

In Pranayama, Pooraka is drawing up the breath. Kumbhaka is retaining the breath. Rechaka is exhaling the breath. These three kinds of breath are from within. Nothing is taken from outside. While thus the practice is going on, the Prana will move only in one nerve. We then feel the internal joy. Who can describe this Brahmananda? The outside world will then be forgotten. We will then be in the world beyond.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan explains about the 3 kinds of breath (as given by Maharishi Patanjali in Patanjali Yog Sutras) that in pranayama, pooraka is drawing up the breath and retaining or holding the breath is kumbhaka, while exhaling the breath is rechaka. But Bhagwan makes a revelation here, which is not really explained in the Yoga sutras. He says, that these 3 kind of breaths are taken from within and nothing is taken from outside. He is emphasising more on the inner subtle breath than the outer gross breath. Even though the practice actually involves the outer breath of air, and while this practice is going on, within actually the prana is moving in a nerve, what he mentions as “move only in one nerve”. This one nerve he is referring to the main Sushumna Nadi. He says that when this happens one experiences the deep internal joy, Brahmananda, which is indescribable. With this, he says, one will forget the outside world and be in the world beyond. Meaning, when the prana begins moving in the Sushumna, and one begins experiencing the eternal bliss, their experience would be withdrawn from the external world and they would become established in the inner world of constant bliss. This state is the state of samadhi where all duality disappears and one remains established in the nondual infinite state.

Additional Notes

Refer previously mentioned verses on sushumna nadi in verses 2, 53.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 57

This world” means Jeevatma; the “next world” means the union of Jeevatman and Paramatman.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says this world is Jeevatma and the next world is merging of Jeevatman (individual consciousness) and Parmatman.

To understand this verse, it is most important to understand the meaning of Jeevatman and Parmatman, which Bhagwan defined in the beginning verses. Jeevatman is the individual consciousness and Parmatman is the supreme consciousness. This world means the world of duality, the world of maya (illusion) and the next world means the realm of nonduality. These two worlds are not two separate but this world of illusion has emerged from the next world of reality. Dvaita (duality) emerged from Advaita (nonduality) and this nonduality is a mere projection and play of consciousness, where everything appears separate from each other. In this world of duality all the drama of countless beings are played out. It is this duality that causes birth and death occurs and causes the souls to ‘come’ and ‘go’ to exhaust their karmic loads. Karma is the fuel to bring one into this world of duality. The jeevatma (individual being) in this world are mostly “lost” in the illusion of duality that keeps them bound to this world for eras. Eventually, as the jeevatma exhaust their karmic fuel and become more and more purified, they begin seeing through the veil of maya and see the illusion of the cosmic drama. This is when the jeevatma begins realising its true identity and is desirous of returning back to it’s source (parmatman). This is when the jeevatman makes all attempts to purify the karmic baggage so as to get off this world and move to the next world of reality. As the individual consciousness (jeevatman) merges with the supreme consciousness (parmatman) the soul moves out from this dual, unreal, finite world (which Bhagwan refers as this world) into the  nondual, real, infinite world (which Bhagwan refers as next world) and remains united with the supreme consciousness, thus losing it’s personal false identity and claiming its real identity of what Bhagwan explains in verse 9 as “Jeevatman is Parmatman“.

Additional Notes

Please refer to verses 7 & 9 where a detailed explanation has been given about Jeevatman and Parmatman.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 58

Just as small rivers enter the sea, our attention must be fixed on the internal breath.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like the small rivers enter the sea, our attention must be fixed on the internal breath. This verse is the continuation of the previous two verses where he had mentioned about the internal breathing through the Sushumna Nadi and merging individual consciousness with the supreme consciousness (verse 56 & 57). By doing so he had said that one moves from this world (duality) to the next world (nonduality) and experiences supreme bliss. In this verse, he is referring the river to the Sushumna Nadi and the sea is being referred to the Sahasrara chakra. He says that just like rivers enter the sea, attention must be fixed on the internal breath (prana) that moves up the Sushumna Nadi (river) and merges in the Sahasrara (sea). Here, river also represents the individual consciousness merging into the sea which is the supreme consciousness.

Additional Notes

Refer to previously mentioned verses on sushumna nadi in verses 2, 53.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 59

What is visible is transient; it is perishable. When the mind is merged in “Bindu” and “Nada”, Nirvikalpa Samadhi is attained. Our attention is then entirely towards Ananda (eternal joy). Fixing the attention between the eyebrows, the Prana should enter the holy Brahmarandhra. Here the light of lights becomes visible to the divine eye. This is Mukti. This is eternally supreme joy. This is the place where the Manas ought to dwell. This is the eternal being whence the Vedas have sprung. This is seeing Paramatman in all; this is the real place of Jeevatman.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

When Bhagwan says ‘what is visible’ he is referring to the dual world that we live in where everything is temporary and perishable (see verse 15 & 48). He says when the mind is merged in the bindu and nada (see verse 3 for detailed explanation on nada & bindu), Nirvikalpa Samadhi is attained (see verse 49 for detailed explanation on Nirvikalpa Samadhi) and then the attention remains fixed on the eternal bliss (ananda). Bhagwan says the attention must be fixed between the eyebrows (ajna chakra) and the prana from the mooladhara chakra must be directed upwards through the Sushumna Nadi and made to enter the holy Brahmarandhra, situated at the Sahasrar Chakra (see verse 7 for complete details on this process). He says here is where the Divine Light – the light of lights becomes visible through the inner eye. Bhagwat Gita refers to this Divine Light of the Soul equivalent to the brilliance of a thousand suns. He says this is mukti (liberation) and eternal supreme joy. He says this is the actual place where the mind must actually dwell. He says this is the place from where the Vedas have sprung from. He concludes saying that this place is the real abode of the jeevatman (individual consciousness) and when one is established here, one only sees parmatman (god) in all, for all duality vanishes and everything is just one. (refer to verses 7 & 9 for detailed explanation on this).

Additional Notes

What is Brahmarandhra?

There is a soft spot just on top of the head and this spot is known as Brahmarandhra. When the child is born, everyone knows about the soft tender spot above the head, where the bone is not yet formed and remains that way for many years.

Brahma means the creator and Randhra means a passage, so it literally means “passage of Brahma” or the “passage of the creator”. It is through this space that the soul descends into the fetus while in the womb and it is through this passage that a fully evolved soul exits the body to reunite with the creator. So the start of the soul journey is through the Brahmarandhra and final exit is through the Brahmarandhra. So, it can be said that after you get split from the creator, you enter through this passage and keep repeating birth and death until you fully evolve and after complete purify you take back this same passage. All births take through this passage but all death exits are not. Depending on the level of consciousness, the soul after every human birth leaves through various other exits to other realms that match their level of consciousness. Creation has made the process such that each time the soul enters the fetus, it still has time to decide whether to continue or not, and thus the Brahmarandhra remains open for sometime. So it stays in the fetus for sometime and decides. If it does not find it suitable, it will always exit back from where it came from – Brahmarandhra. This is why there are many cases of still-born babies, whose medical parameters are all fine and noone can understand why there was a stillbirth; many cases, the soul has decided to leave.

The Brahmarandhra is the 10th door of exit, which is why it is also known as Dasamdvar. The other nine exits are in various other locations of the body that keep descending down to the lowest, that is, 1st door. The other 9 doors from lowest to highest are the body openings of:

  1. The first door is the anus, indicating control over food.
  2. The second door is the genitalia, indicating control over sexual urges.
  3. The third door is the mouth, indicating control over speech.
  4. The fourth door is the right nostril.
  5. The fifth door is the left nostril. Nostrils indicate control over the breath.
  6. The sixth door is right ear. 
  7. The seventh door is the left ear. Ears indicate control over hearing and understanding.
  8. The eight door is the right eye.
  9. The ninth door is the left eye. Eyes indicate control over vision or the ability to perceive through the inner eye with heightened awareness.
  10. The tenth door is the Brahmarandhra, which is situated above the head, at the location of the Sahasrar chakra and the yogi can reach this door only after he/she has acquired complete control over the other 9 doors.

The Yogi has the ability to consciously and with personal will move out through the 10th door because he has control over the movement of prana through the sushumna nadi, which is what almost the whole Chidakasha Gita speaks about – achieving the control over breath. A soul lost in ignorance and gripped by maya is unable to have the control and ability to choose the exit door. Thus, the exiting of prana from the body is unconscious, and the prana of a person who has not lived without consciousness exits without the conscious will of the individual through the door at which level the consciousness of the individual is vibrating at. For example, the soul who has lived a life of utter cruelty and evil tendencies, the prana will exit through the 1st or 2 door (anus or genitals). One indication that the soul has passed out from the lowest doors is that the individual passes out stool or urine at the time of death. Likewise, opening of the mouth at the time of death indicates soul having moved through this door and eyes turned upwards can indicate it having exited through the eyes.

The Yogi who has completed his journey through spiritual practices and has mastered the control of breath and prana, willfully exits through the 10th door. This is how Yogis choose their time of death, like in a Jeeva Samadhi. This is how Shaligram Swami left his body after taking permission from his Guru, Bhagwan Nithyananda.

In the yogic tradition, this is why the skull of an enlightened being is broken open with a coconut after he has taken samadhi, indicating the soul to exit through the Brahmarandhra. In my understanding, this is how Bhagwan gave permission symbolically to Shaligram Swami by sending a devotee to him with a coconut, seeing which Shaligram Swami, who was waiting eagerly for permission, smiled and proceeded with his process of exiting the body. To my understanding the coconut symbolised this, which only the Guru and disciple knew at that time. This is precisely why Bhagwan instructed the devotees not to break his skull during Samadhi and said that he would serve the world for the next 500 years! Meaning, the soul not exit but be present in the Samadhi for the next 500 years. Bhagwan had wanted Shaligram Swami to stay back and told him he has work to do, but since he had made up his mind to exit, Bhagwan, though allowing him to leave, still presented the opportunity of him serving the world through his Jeeva Samadhi at Ganeshpuri.

So, the Brahmarandhra is the door of immortality. There are 72,000 subtle nadis out of which the 3 major nadis are the Sushumna, Ida and Pingala. There are 114 chakras out of which major chakras are 7 chakras, which are situated in various parts of the human body. Above the Sahasrara, out of the body, there are two higher chakras and the sushumna nadi is connected to these and the nadi exits through the Brahmarandhra. The Kathopanishad says, “A hundred and one are the nerves of the heart. Of them one (Sushumna) has gone out piercing the head; going up through it, one attains immortality.”

By now you would have realised how Chidakasha Gita is a plethora of the mystical mysteries of the human soul journey which is already expounded in the Vedas and Upanishads. Bhagwan in this verse reveals clearly where the Vedas are accessed. The words of Bhagwan are the Vedas and Upanishads itself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 60

The real place of Jeeva is formless, indivisible. God pervades in all things, movable and immovable. He is the ONE without a second. God is the origin of Vedas. He is the Lord of the body. He is the Lord of Jeevan-Mukti. Man to be man, must meditate (ruminate) upon God.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the real quality of the Jeeva is formless and indivisible, because it is god, the Supreme itself (see verse 7 & 8). God pervades in all things, movable and immovable, because it was out of the creator that everything came into existence. He is one without a second. This emphasis of Bhagwan can be found throughout Chidakasha Gita of Oneness – of nonduality, how there is nothing separate from each other, how everything is one, without a second. He says god is the origin of Vedas. The Maharishis had tapped into their own deep inner self to access the god within themselves, from where they brought forth all the wisdom of the Vedas. He says that god is the lord of the body as the body is nothing but a divine manifestation of god. He is also thus the lord of jeevan-mukti (liberation). He says that man must meditate upon that god within so that man be man, meaning man be human.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 61

He who meditates on the “reality” is a Sanyasi; he is a yogi. The distinction of “Pariah” exists in the external. Internally, all is one without distinction. What is “Pariah” is not after death. A “Pariah” is he who has envy and pride; who holds vain discussion about religion; who talks ill of others behind their backs. Sewing is not stitching thread and cloth; but stitching manas and buddhi, i.e., merging manas in buddhi.

Now the distinction of male and female; a true female is one who is merged in the external; a true male is one who is merged in the internal. One whose buddhi is firm is male; one whose buddhi is fickle is a female. This distinction of male and female is external only. Internally such a distinction does not exist at all. When the manas and buddhi are merged in the Atman, one who is physically a woman becomes spiritually a ‘man’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that he who meditates on the reality is a Sanyasi, a Yogi. What is the reality? That there is no two, everything is one. Reality is the unseen, subtle that needs the inner eye of a Yogi to be seen and known. In this reality, there are no higher and lower, but all equal. Bhagwan says that distinction made for a ‘pariah’ is only in the external. Pariah means outcaste, and casteism and untouchability was very prevalent in the days of Bhagwan (see verse 21 for details on pariah). He says all distincitons of caste and other such discrimination of superiority and inferiority is only something of the external unreal world, but everything is equal in the real inner world. Internally, all is without any distinction. He says, the discrimination of color, creed, caste, etc, do not exist after the death. Bhagwan says a ‘pariah’ instead is the one who holds envy and pride, who judges and holds vain discussion about religion of others, and who talks ill of others behind their backs. These are the real outcastes. Bhagwan says real sewing is not just knitting thread and cloth but sewing together the mind (manas) and the intellect (buddhi), that is, merging of the mind into the intellect. Meaning, all discriminations are the play of the mind and all discriminations cease when the mind merges into the intellect. The importance of having a sharpened buddhi that governs the mind, has been spoken various times till now in the Chidakasha Gita by Bhagwan (refer to verses 16, 22, 23, 26, 49).

Bhagwan then speaks about the distinction between male and female. He emphasises that gender is not what we generally discriminate by the external characteristics, but the masculine and feminine are qualities present in every human being. Those days women were suppressed and treated as weak and inferior, and that is why he drew attention of everyone to the fact that these distinctions of male and female are only external and internally such distinctions does not exist at all, because the soul has no gender. He says that being a male or female is actually on the internal qualities of the person. One (man or woman) who remains merged and absorbed in the inner realms of reality is a male and one (man or woman) who remains merged and engrossed in the external world of maya is a female. Similarly, one (man or woman) whose intellect is firm and sharp is a male and one (man or woman) whose buddhi is fickle is a female. He ends the verse saying that the one whose mind and intellect remain merged with the atman (soul), even if that one is physically a woman, she becomes spiritually a man. The verse had began with Bhagwan stating thus that only the one who meditates on the reality is a Yogi, a Sanyasi. Meaning, only the one who sees a human beyond all external discrimination and sees the reality is a Yogi, a Sanyasi.

Additional Notes

The masculine-principle has been defined and taught across various religions and practices in many interesting ways. You may like to refer to these for more depth of understanding of the inner man and woman that exists in all human beings.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 62

The body is the cave. In this cave dwells the Atman. Atman, dwelling in the body, must attain “Moksha” (liberation). The outward bodily parts are various; in the invisible (subtle) all is one indivisible. OM is Pranava. Pranava pervades the form (body) . OM is bodylessness and formlessness.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the body is the cave, in which dwells the Atman (soul). This soul must attain liberation. The visible body parts is all finite and fragmented in many parts, but the invisible soul within is infinite and indivisible. He says ‘Aum’ is the pranava, meaning ‘cosmic sound’ and this cosmic sound is spread throughout the body. Even then the cosmic sound (Aum) is bodyless and formless.

Additional Notes

What does it mean that AUM pervades the body and is bodylessness and formlessness?

Everything in this Cosmos is made of vibrations and vibrations is nothing but sound. Each sound heard by the ear is nothing but a vibration at a certain frequency. All sounds are produced by striking two objects, but the only sound in the cosmos that is caused on it’s own is what is called as “Anhad Naad” meaning the ‘unstruck sound’ (see verse 3 where Bhagwan has talked about this sound). The Upanishads explain this, especially the “Nada Bindu Upanishad” in great detail and this Upanishad is part of the Rig Veda. It explains how everything in the cosmos was created out of this cosmic sound. Sound creates matter and that is how all the matter in the cosmos is created from. The vibration or frequency of this cosmic sound is so subtle that it can be only heard only by the ‘inner ear’ in deep meditative states, and the sound that can be heard is AUM. This subtle frequency sound vibrating as AUM pervades in all matter and that is why Bhagwan in this verse points out that pranava (AUM) pervades the form. Thus every ‘body’ is pervaded by the sound of AUM that cannot be seen or heard casually but still the existence of the body is from the vibration of AUM. It is invisible and indivisible because it is from that ONE cosmic sound of AUM. When body or form dissolves what remains is only AUM, and that is why Bhagwan states that  AUM is bodylessness and formlessness.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 63

Bhakti in the beginning, is selfish. After-wards, there is no selfishness in it. When a man attains perfection, the whole universe becomes to him, his guru.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

To understand this verse rightly, it would be important to first know what Bhagwan exactly means by “bhakti”. He has already mentioned about “bhakti” in verse 43 & 44. In general terms we understand bhakti” as devotion. But by “bhakti” Bhagwan means UNIVERSAL LOVE or UNCONDITIONAL LOVE. In verse 43 & 44, he means true devotion (bhakti) is not in the devotional love only to one’s personal god or guru, but having that same devotion for each and every being in existence!

With reference to that, if we read the current verse, then it can be clearly understood when Bhagwan says bhakti (unconditional love) in the beginning is selfish, meaning in the start our love is conditional. It may begin with one developing love towards one’s guru or istha (god) but Bhagwan says that still is selfish in the beginning.  He says afterwards there is no selfishness in it. He further says that when a man attains perfection (developing unconditional love towards all), the whole universe becomes to him, his guru. Meaning, he has the same reverence that he has towards his guru towards every person, and he extends that same quality of love he has towards his guru now towards every being he comes across.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 64

What is called “Hatha Yoga” is selfishness. In Hatha yoga a man seeks his own goodness. He seeks fame; he can stop the sunrise of tomorrow; he can create a mountain of gold. To say “I am Brahma” is not just. “Thou art ALL; ALL art thou”, we must say. A yogi is one who thinks the whole universe to be a yogi. He should regard all as himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that what is called as Hatha Yoga is selfishness. Hatha Yoga is a branch of Yoga that deals with physical asanas and postures. “Hatha” means stubbornness or ‘by force’ where certain postures and exercises are done by forceful exertion, mostly against the free nature of the body’s limitations. Mostly the focus remains on one’s body and since it is more ‘self-centered’ Bhagwan says it is selfishness. Bhagwan, in Chidakasha Gita, has been expounding more on Raja Yoga, since it is selfless and motives are more towards the highest good of all. He says that in Hatha Yoga man seeks his own goodness and glorification. He says that thus man seeks his own fame. His desires are more towards claiming to stop the next morning sun or his ability to create a mountain of gold (riches); Bhagwan is indirectly referring to desires of siddhis (spiritual powers). He says it is not rightful to keep saying, “I am Brahma” or “I am god”. He says instead we must say, “You are in all, all are in you.” Bhagwan is referring to universal love (as continuation from previous verse). Seeing and experiencing god in all and all in god is truly the meaning of “i am that i am” and it is not just by speech alone. The verse ends with Bhagwan saying that a Yogi is the one who feels and sees everyone in universe as a yogi, and not just himself. He should regard everyone as himself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 65

If a man goes to a forest and there lives in a cave, it is just like a beast in a cave. Even the milestones are better than such a man because by the milestones, we can count the distance in miles. Such people are of no use whatsoever. A thoughtful man should gradually go on renouncing the world. When a man eats food, it is for his own benefit. Others are not benefitted by it. It is not enough if we leave darkness. We must always live in the light. If we have a light on a dark path, we have no fear. There is fear in walking in darkness.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if a man goes to a forest and lives there in a cave it is as good as a beast living in a cave. He says that such a man is of no use to anyone at all; even a milestone is better useful than such a man because the milestone is atleast helping people to know the distances in their travel. So, Bhagwan says, such ones are of no use  to anyone, whatsoever. He says a thoughtful person is the one who gradually goes on renouncing the world. It is as selfish as a man eating food, for he eats it for his own benefit and others do not benefit anything out of it. He says, so it is not enough if one leaves darkness, we must always learn to live in light. Meaning, leaving the world for its darkness is not enough, but one must rather learn to find the light within the darkness and illuminate it. For that Bhagwan says, we must have a light on a dark path and then there will be no fear. Gnana or wisdom is the light. If one has true wisdom then that wisdom will illuminate even the dark path, which will keep away fear because he says there is fear only when you are walking in darkness without the light.

So, in very simple words Bhagwan is saying that one must not renounce the world and run away from it from the fear of its darkness, rather one must live in the world with the light ignited within that will help navigate through the world. But at the same time, in this verse, he says that living in the world, one must slowly go on renouncing the world. This renouncing is true renouncing that will not only benefit the individual but also help the people in the world.

Additional Notes

How can one renounce the world gradually?

True renouncement is not external renouncing but internal renouncement. Unless the renouncement is from within, the external renouncement will give only more pain and misery. Because when a person leaves the world out of frustration or inability to cope with it, then he is only externally renouncing it but internally he is still attached with it. He carries everything with him in his mind and emotions even into the cave, where he will still be bothered by the fears, emotions, tendencies. True renouncement is using the light of the wisdom and converting the inner darkness (of attachment, greed, anger, hatred, dependency, lust, and such vices) into light. This is true renouncing of darkness with the help of light. Once these inner darkness begins to be transmuted, one is able to easily renounce the world. As the internal changes, the results can be seen in the external. As the internal detachment happens attachment to external world also starts decreasing and thus renouncement happens gradually but firmly. So, by living in the world and yet being detached with it is true renouncement or vairagya.

How does the one gradually renouncing by living in the world help others?

One internally renouncing the world gradually only means that the individual is now aligning with the higher wisdom and returning back to their true nature of who they are. They are realigning to the true nature of their soul and becoming more united with it, thus depending lesser and lesser on the external world for their needs. The needs can be anything – from food to love to support. Every need and dependency from the external world starts reducing as the soul begins realising its true resource from the Self. This finishes off gradually the karmic ties due with the world and it immensely helps all those who were bonded in karmic dues with the individual. This cannot happen if one runs away for the give and take of karmic dues remain pending and thus this only postpones liberation. Being in the world, allows one to participate in the karmic settlement while at the same time allow one to do everything that he would have done in a cave anyways. Being in the world gives consistent tests and checks to know if one is rising above the triggers of the vices embedded deep within one’s psyche. This gives opportunity to work more on the areas that need attention. Being in a cave one will never know the triggers. Thus, by consistently working on oneself while in the world, one is immensely helping all those involved too in their evolution. Gradually, as the individual succeeds renouncing the world more and getting more aligned with his own divinity and final goal of life, he becomes a practical, living role model for the world, who then can be immensely benefitted as they learn from him. Such an individual living in the world is a constant reminder to the world he lives in, about their own true nature and the true purpose of their lives.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 66

If you perform tapas for thousands of years with the desire for “results”, it is of no avail. But if you perform tapas for one ghatika (twenty-four minutes) without any desire for “fruits”, you will see ALL in God and God in ALL.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that it is of no use if you perform tapas (austerity) for thousands of years with the desire for results because there is a selfish intention behind it. But, if you do selfless tapas just even for one ghatika (24 minutes) without any desire for the fruits (benefits) of it, you will see all in god and god in all.

Additional Notes

How can one be motivated to perform tapas without a purpose for it?

This is precisely what Lord Krishna expounds in the Bhagwad Gita to Arjuna saying, “Let not the fruit of action be your motive to action. Your business is with action alone, not with the fruit of action.” This is one of the most popular teachings of Bhagwad Gita yet probably not the one truly understood to its real meaning.

What Bhagwan and Lord Krishna are referring to here is “performing action as one’s dharma or one’s duty” and not performing action motivated by the fruits (results) of that action. This is because the moment one does an action for a specific result the action is no more in the purified form of dharma, because not it has taints of some desired fruits. Desire is always selfish. It will have some or the other motive of some benefit for oneself. When the priority is of benefit to oneself it misses the quality of being for the highest good of all and such actions thus is not pure. The fruits also thus will not be pure and can be detrimental.

Arjuna was denying to do his dharma at the battlefield and was ready to quit the war because on the other side of the war, he saw his own people. Seeing this he became reluctant to kill his own people. Whereas, as the King representing dharma, he was supposed to have simply done his dharma (righteous duty). He would have done that if his focus was on the dharma, but it was on the fruits of his action. He feared the results of his action. He was now moving away from dharma because his mind became biased seeing his own relations in the side of the enemy (adharma). So indirectly he was refusing to fight adharma (unrighteousness) just because his own people were in it. Lord Krishna thus reminds him that as a true Kshatriya is the one who performs his dharma without any bias. Now, note that the feeling of bias came into Arjuna’s mind because he was more focussed on the fruits of his actions and not his action. If he would have been focussed only on his action that would have certainly been motived by righteousness (dharma). So Lord Krishna explains and gives him the wisdom.

The actual secret behind selfless action (nishkaam karma) is your liberation. Because every karma (action) has a reaction. Every little or big thing we do has an outcome. Example: If you go for a walk, you may miss a person who comes home to meet you, you may step on a living being, you may cause a sprain, you may have a health benefit, you may bump into a person you were looking for, you may sweat profusely causing you uneasiness…. the list of possibilities are endless. With every action there are countless possibilities. Those possibilities are your karmic returns.  So, if you do an action motivated by the fruit of that action, the quality of result can vary greatly. Like you may think that walking increases life span and go for a walk. Now, note that the walk is motivated by the fruit of the action and not the action itself. The desire is prolonged life and walk is only an outcome of that desire. Though this seems so harmless, it still has many subtle possibilities. Chances are that your friend gets diagnosed with a heart palpitation after his walking routine and you can stop your walk. Chances are that you are out for walk and you see someone fallen on the road and needing your help but you may not really be concerned because “your walk” and “your increased lifespan” is your priority and maybe not really someone else’s. Now, ignoring that will have its own repercussions karmically.  Stopping your walk because of your friend will have it’s own repercussions. This is how the actions and fruits keep one looped and entangled always.

But then, there is a way to do an action and yet not suffer it’s karmic repercussion. Lord Krishna explains a way to be unbound by the karmic fruits. This is through nishkaam karma.  Nishkaam Karma means “action without any desire”.  Now, let us see what if the person talking the walk was not motivated by any fruits of that action but just did the act as his dharma or as a human duty.  The motivation to do that act of walking now comes not from the fruits of it but simply from the duty that he is performing as a being with a human body.  He is entirely focussed on the act and not on any fruits of it. Thus any repercussions from the fruit of that action also will not affect, whatever happens during that walk. He cannot be demotivated by the news of a friend’s heart palpitation. He will keep his walk. He may or may not attend to that needy person, again depending on what his dharma would be. He would help the person without any motive or the focus of the outcome of that act. He would just do what is best and right and keep going. When each act becomes this way, without having any intention on the fruits, it becomes the purest action because it is not tainted with any selfish motives. So what he does is automatically of his highest good and the highest good of all. The best part is that he will not be affected by the outcomes of that karma, because he was simply not interested in the outcome!!

So when one is doing tapas, it one does it just because it is his dharma or duty to do that divine act and not motivated by any of his personal desire, that tapas becomes the more purest. This is why Bhagwan says that if one does tapas without any desire of its fruits for even one ghatika, he will begin seeing all in god and god in all. Meaning, he dissolves duality and enters into the nondual realm. Such powerful can be an act without desire for fruits!

Most importantly, this attitude will help keep the practitioner completely detached from the outcomes of the activities of daily life that he is involved and since he is no more accumulating any good or bad deeds as a result of each action that he does, he is simply exhausting his prarabdh karma by finishing them off one by one, but gathering no further karmic substance.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 67

Hatha yoga is duality. The most excellent is Raja Yoga. No man should think he is the doer. Everything is ordained by the great Self. Salt is obtained from sea water. When it is mixed with water, it becomes one with it. Similarly, Maya springs from Paramatman and finally merges in him.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Hatha yoga is duality (see verse 55 & 64) which has elaborated details on Hatha yoga). Bhagwan says this because of the only the aspect of physicality given in this form of yoga. The moment anything separates from the nondual aspect, from the subtle, it becomes gross. Gross is duality. With duality comes the feeling of doership. The doer feels he is the doer because he is disconnected from the subtlety of that practice and thus the ego seeks fame and glory in this (see verse 64 elaborated on this). Bhagwan says no man should think he is the doer because everything is ordained by the great Self (supreme). So, Bhagwan advocates Raja Yoga to be the most exceleent, because Raja Yoga has all aspects of the gross and subtle. (see verse 33 which elaborates on Raja Yoga; Ashtanga Yoga). Bhagwan says just like how the salt is obtained from sea water, maya (duality/illusion) also comes from the Parmatman (supreme), and just like when the salt is mixed in plain water, it dissolves into the water completely, maya also finally dissolves back into Parmatman (supreme).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 68

“Vedanta means Prana. To be entirely merged in Prana, is Vedanta. Vedanta is one indivisible. It is unbreakable. What is called Veda recitation is not from the tongue. Veda recitation should be from the throat. Those who know this secret are Brahmins. Veda is the one letter AUM. It is the fire of inspiration. Vedanta is formless and changeless; indivisible. Light is caused by Veda. What is called Dharana in yoga is the real recitation of Veda.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Vedanta means prana. To be entirely merged in prana is Vedanta. Normally, one feels that Vedanta means study of scriptures; that is intellectual wisdom. What Bhagwan is talking of is “being Vedanta”, and that can happen when one is not in body consciousness but merged in his prana. Prana is the source of life of a human, the nourishment of life. (to know more about prana refer to verses 11, 33 & 56) Bhagwan says prana is Vedanta itself. He says prana is one indivisible and unbreakable. Prana is the fuel of cosmic energy of the cosmos and is thus the nondual indivisible aspect of creation. When it comes to recitation of the Vedas, we normally hear the recitation from Brahmin pandits who are well versed in the vedic scriptures and they recite it from their memory. Bhagwan says true recitation of the Vedas is not from the tongue but from the throat. The throat chakra is the energy center of expression of higher truths. When one is deeply rooted in prana (higher consciousness), the Vedas begin to flow from the throat. This is precisely how the great Maharishis wrote the Vedas! Bhagwan says only those who know this secret and those who can express the Vedas from their throats are true Brahmins. Further, he says that Vedas is the one letter AUM, which is the fire of inspiration. It is from here that Vedas initiate. (read more on the deep meaning of AUM in verses 6 & 62). Since Vedas spring from the eternal one nondual source of AUM, he says Vedanta is indivisible, formless and thus changeless. He says Vedas are the eternal source of light. He then refers to the 6th major point of Raja Yoga – Dharana, which means ‘uninterrupted awareness” (to read the 8 points of Raja (Ashtanga) Yoga see verse 33). He says being in this state of uninterrupted awareness is nothing but the recitation of Vedas itself. It means when one is established truly in this state of uninterrupted awareness and stillness, what flows through is the light of Vedas itself, the eternal truths.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 69

Just as a tyre of a bicycle is filled with air by a pump, the nadis should be filled with “Vedanta discrimination”. Prana should be raised to Brahmarandhra, the highest point in the brain. The nadis should be purified and such purification should be done step by step. Buddhi and manas should become one with Paramatman. You should play with him. You should sit in the upper storey and look around downwards. Buddhi’s place is above. Buddhi must become one with Jnana. You should always drink the water of eternal joy. You must be one with the nectar of Ananda. You must know those who are always merged in this eternal joy. You should know the very secret of this Ananda. Truly, the Kundalini must be awakened. Just as we rock a child in a cradle, we should fix our attention in the head and examine what takes place there. Paramananda (supreme bliss), Sadananda (eternal bliss) are there in the head. Shivalinga is also in the head which should be one.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like how a bicycle tyres are filled with air by a pump, similarly the nadis also must be filled with prana. In the previous verse he mentioned how prana is vedanta and how when one is entirely merged in prana, one is merged in vedanta. In this verse he says nadis must be filled with vedanta discrimination (explained below in additional notes). He says prana should be raised to the Brahmarandhra, which is the highest point in the brain (at the Sahasrara). He says the nadis should be thus purified step-by-step by following this process of pumping prana into the nadis and raising it to the Brahmarandhra (see full details about Brahmarandhra in verse 59). It is then that the buddhi (intellect) and manas (mind) becomes one with Parmatman (supreme/god). To know more about buddhi and manas see verse 16, 22, 23, 26, 49, 61. Bhagwan says that you must play with him (supreme/god). Meaning, the closeness with that god-self must be so free and casual that you play with the source. He says you must sit in the upper storey (sahasrara) and look around downwards. When you state of consciousness is rooted in the Sahasrara, it is pure awareness from where the consciousness is a mere witness to everything. This is what Bhagwan means when he says being seated in an upper storey and being able to watch everything below, meaning the activities in the lower chakras, the functioning of the buddhi and manas and all activities governed by the mind and intellect. He says that the position of buddhi is higher than the mind, which in previous verses he mentioned many times how mind should be under the control of the intellect. He then says that the buddhi must become one with jnana (vedanta wisdom or supreme wisdom). You must be one with the nectar of ananda (to know more about this nectar see verse 22). He says you must know those who are always merged in this eternal joy, meaning you must keep company of the self-realised who are constantly enjoying this nectar of eternal bliss, and thus strive to know the secret of this ananda (bliss). He exalts that truly the kundalini must be awakened. He says just like a small child is put in a cradle and gently put to stillness and peace, we must fix out attention in the head (sahasrara) and and examine (witness) what is happening there. He says that is the very place where reside parmananda (eternal bliss) and sachidananda (supreme bliss). He finally concludes that Shivalinga also is there in the head itself where one must merge with it.

Additional Notes

What is vedanta discrimination?

Discrimination is called as viveka in sanskrit and is power of the buddhi (intellect) to differentiate between the right and wrong and in the real sense, real and unreal. When the Buddhi is not sharp enough or active enough, it’s quality of discrimination can suffer. The power to discriminate in a man of low consciousness is is different from that of a man with evolved consciousness to that of a man living in survival to that of a drunkard. The power of each of these individuals vary depending on how sharpened the buddhi is. Bhagwan has been consistently referring to the importance of sharpening the buddhi through this book. So in this verse he says that one filled with prana is one merged with vedanta discrimination. The Vedas are the eternal truths of the reality of life. Vedas shed eternal light on the what is real and what is unreal. One who is merged in the Vedas is merged with the experiential  knowledge of what is real and unreal. He has the power to easily discriminate between the real and unreal, between the dual and nondual, between the truth and illusion (maya). An Avadhoota is 24×7 in this state having realised the reality of the Self. Those on the path begin to realise this state as they merge with the Vedanta, that is merge with the prana (see previous verse for explanation on this.) So, Bhagwan says pumping prana into one’s nadis is filling the nadis with ‘vedanta discrimination’.

How does one pump in prana?

If you have been contemplating on all the verses each day, you would have easily figured out how this prana is pumped in, for nothing has been left incomplete by Bhagwan in the Chidakasha Gita; so highly advisable to study it in entirety.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 70

When you rub a match to the side of a box, you obtain fire. You should cook every day. You should avoid all distinctions. When the recipient is fit, he should be initiated. That man who has the power of discrimination should be initiated.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when you rub a match to the side of a body, you ignite fire. Bhagwan has very clearly described earlier in verse 16, what is this igniting of the match. He had mentioned there that the manas (mind) is the match and buddhi (intellect) is the side of the match. He had said that the mind must constantly be rubbed again the intellect to realise the kingdom of the Self. Meaning, the mind must be subjected to intellect and thus the intellect sharpened. When intellect is sharpened, it attains the power of viveka (discrimination) and is able to realise what is real and what is unreal while living in the dual world, thus remain free of maya (illusion).

Then in the current verse he further continues saying that with this fire, you must cook every day, meaning one must work on himself every day by doing the practice (sadhana). By regular practice, he is able to move into nonduality by realising the reality of oneness, and thus be able to avoid all distinctions and discriminations of duality. He says when such a perfection is obtained, is one fit enough to receive initiation. He ends the verse saying that fit is the one who has attained the power of discrimination, who has sharpened his buddhi (intellect) and is able to see no distinction in the dual world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 71

If food is given to a man who has no hunger, it will cause indigestion in him. Those whose belly is full have no hunger. Those who are well dressed feel the cold, the greater.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like how if food is given to a man who has no hunger, it will only cause indigestion in him, similarly if initiation and imparting of the eternal wisdom to the one who is not ready will only cause spiritual indigestion in him. He says those who belly is full have no hunger, meaning those who are satiated by worldly desires and pursuits will have no hunger for spiritual wisdom and spiritual pursuits. He says the well-dressed are the ones who feel more cold, meaning the more he runs behind fulfilling his desires, the more desires will add up for him. The metaphor that Bhagwan uses for this example is that the more clothes you wear to feel warm, the more colder you feel, with the desire to wear more clothes, and thus the never-ending loop of desires and its fulfilment.

Additional Notes

Fulfilment of desires versus suppression

Though the verse says that hankering after desires is not wise, it should be noted that suppression of desires is not wise either. That is why many school of thoughts have advised fulfilment but then if this is done without a strong viveka (sense of discrimination), there will be no end to the desires and its fulfilment. The one with a strong intellect with eventually ride out the desires even through fulfilment because his intellect clearly keeps showing him the falseness of that desire which is an illusory play of the mind. His intellect clearly gives him the wisdom of what is real and unreal and eventually he transcends that desire. Without an active viveka if one seeks fulfilment of desires, then the desires are like rakth-beej, where fulfilment of one desire will give birth to more desires with the false illusion that its fulfilment is going to give contentment. The one who practices sharpening the buddhi will eventually find the buddhi helping him in overriding his desires. This is why Bhagwan in the last few verses stressed on the importance of the steady consistent practice of sharpening the intellect and also how only those who are ready with this sharpened intellect (viveka) are worthy enough to be initiated into higher spiritual practices and higher spiritual evolution. It is only when worldly desires reduce that the real hunger for spiritual pursuits would begin.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 72

One must go to Kashi by train. One must reach the town of ‘Shivanandapuri’. One must go to the country of “peace”. One must stop his journey at ‘Brahmanandapuri’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that as one takes a train to reach Kashi, one must reach the town of ‘Shivanandapuri’. By train, he means the passenger to be the consciousness, the Kundalini his train and the rail route is the path of Sushumna Nadi (see verse 2, 56, 58, 59) from Mooladhara to Sahasrara, and Kashi is the final destination of Sahasrar (see verse 58), which he also calls as Brahmanandapuri, because this is where is situated the Brahmarandhra (see verse 59).

So,  here he is talking of the journey of the individual consciousness from lower states upwards until it merges with the Supreme consciousness at the final destination in Sahasrara. He calls this final destination as the country of peace. He ends the verse saying that one must not stop until he reaches this final station of Brahmanandapuri, which is the heart space of Chidakasha, the eternal sky of consciousness.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 73

A man must know himself; he who has conquered the mind is the man; he is the ascetic; he is the yogi; he sees the one Atman in all. Suppose you come into a dark room after wandering in the sun. What do you see? Look at the sun for five minutes and come into a dark room; you see nothing; this is as it ought to be. One must see with the inner (spiritual) eye.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a man must know himself first, for it is only he who has conquered his own mind is the man, the ascetic, the yogi, who is now able to see the one Spirit or the one god within everything and everyone. As referred many times in earlier verses Bhagwan has stressed enough on the fact that main work of every seeker is to solely purify the mind. So in this verse he reveals that a perfected man (yogi/ascetic) is the one who has conquered his own mind and now has the ability to see everything as one, because it is only impurities of the mind that sees, discriminates, judges, and sees others separate from one’s self. He sees the same Atman (soul) in all. Bhagwan cites an example of what would happen when one who wandered in the bright sun suddenly entered a dark room. One would not be able to see anything at all. He says this is how one should switch over from external eyes to the internal eye. When one sees everything from the inner eye, all the distinctions that is seen by the physical eyes vanish into nothingness. Through the inner eye only one is truly able to see everything as one Self.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 74

A ripe fruit is very sweet to the taste. The same fruit when it is unripe is astringent. Both are produced by the same tree. The difference between the two is caused by time. As soon as a coconut is planted in the ground, it does not grow into a plant. First, it sprouts, then it becomes a plant and finally it becomes a tree. A tender coconut tree can be easily plucked from the ground. But a fully grown coconut tree cannot be easily plucked. So also, our mind must be unaffected, whatever people say to us or whatever they say about us; the mind must always be under our control. This is what a man must accomplish in life. This must be ‘the one object’ in life. This a man must accomplish even if his head is to be struck off. We should give a blow with the mind itself, not with a cane or a hand or something. We should learn to tie a man without a rope. This is what a man should accomplish in life.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the fruit when it is ripe is very sweet but the same fruit when unripe is astringent even though they were produced by the same tree. The difference between the two is caused by time. Same way, even an awakened soul and an ignorant soul is born from the same Source but the only difference between them is caused by time.

He then says that a coconut tree does not sprout into a plant as soon as it is planted, but first it has to sprout and then grow into a plant and then finally grow into a tree. He adds that it is easy to pluck a tender coconut from the ground but difficult to pluck a fully grown coconut. Meaning, it is easy to for the mind of an ignorant to be influenced but not the mind of a mature wise soul. It is easy for external influences to affect an tender, immature mind but very difficult for these influences to shake a wise mature soul. He says, in the same manner, we must remain unaffected by what others say to us directly or say about us indirectly. The mind must always remain under our control. Bhagwan says this must become man’s greatest and one object in life to achieve this state, and he says man must strive to achieve this goal even if his head has to be struck off. He says that we must give a blow with the mind itself and not with a cane, hand or something. Meaning, a mastered mind is very powerful and a positive mind can impact others positively if it is a controlled mind. So he says we should be able to give a blow with the mind and not with hand or a cane. He says we must learn to tie a man without a rope, meaning to influence or impact the lives of others without any force or coercion and this mastery is what man must strive to accomplish in life.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 75

The mind is the seat of ‘sin’; it is the cause of action, good and bad. Mind is the cause of all these. If there is no mind, there is no speech, without the mind, nothing can come and nothing can go. But for the mind, nothing can be accomplished. Suppose one knows how to speak English but he does not know how to write it; then we cannot say, he knows English fully. When he knows both, then only he can secure a passing grade in English.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the mind is the seat of “sin” – the cause of all good and bad actions. This is because all thoughts rise in the mind and from the good or bad thoughts arise good or bad words and actions. So mind is the cause of all good or bad, all merits and sins. He says that if there is no mind, there is no speech. So, without the mind nothing can come and nothing can go. He says without the mind nothing can be accomplished. So in continuation to the previous verse, Bhagwan, in this verse, is still talking of mastering the mind to be the main goal of life. Mastery meaning not just knowing about the mind but attaining complete mastery over it. He gives an example of how if one knows how to speak English but does not know how to write it, then one cannot says that he knows English fully. It is only when he knows to complete speak, read and write English that he can secure a passing grade in English. So he is pointing out to having complete mastery of the mind to transcend the mind, because mind is the only cause of all maya that binds one into karma and thus the cause of birth and death.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 76

Even a child, five years old knows that there is God; but the child does not know where God is. The sun sees all; but very few, one in a lakh or two, look at the sun. In this world, three-fourths of the people are fond of sexual pleasures like beasts. Even those who have reached the middle state, are less than one fourth of the people. Good deeds are very few in this world. Evil deeds are many.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that even a small 5-year-old child knows the existence of god but the child does not know where god is. Meaning, knowing about the existence of god is of no importance as to experiencing and realising god. He says that the sun sees all, but only as few as one in 1-2 lakhs dare to look at the sun. Meaning, the supreme consciousness is prevalent in everything in creation, but only a few actually dare to realise it.  Further, he points out to what hinders one from realising god. He says, in this world three-fourths of the people are engrossed in sexual pleasures like the beasts. Even those who have managed to reach the middle state are less than one-fourth of the population. By middle state, he means the seekers who have succeeded in at least partly transcending the lures of the mind.

Additional Notes

How to realise god?

In this verse Bhagwan is stressing on how important it is not just being content knowing the existence of god or being just a believer in god because even a believer can be living trapped unconsciously in lures of the mind and yet be comfortable with the feeling that he is a believer in god, without making any attempts to realise that god. Those who make these attempts are very less in number and it is for this ignorance reason why evil is so prevalent than good in this world. Again, these verses are in continuation to previous verses where for realising god, he is still pointing to gaining mastery over mind by purifying the mind. He thus points out the reason why good deeds are very few in this world as compared to the evil deeds. If man made genuine efforts in purifying the mind, he would begin transcending the lower animalistic tendencies, and there would naturally be an upsurge in good deeds in the world, which would collectively reflect on the collective consciousness of the world, thus reflect in the state of the world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 77

“Swami is he who has united the Chit with Sat. Upadhi means the tree of peace. We must take shelter under this ‘tree of peace’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a Swami is the one who has united the Chit (awareness or consciousness) with Sat (eternal truth). Chit is one’s individual awareness of the Self. Sat is the eternal truth of real essence – the supreme infinite unborn undying consciousness. So, the one who realised his self and merged his Self with the infinite consciousness is a Swami. The upadhi means the tree of peace. Upadhi means the ability to subtly discriminate between the real and unreal. This subtle discrimination happens to the one who has realised the Self. One who has attained self-realisation is a Swami. One must take shelter under such a Swami, who is the tree of peace.

Additional Notes

Read verse 53 which explains in detail what is Sat, Chit and Ananda, which is the liberated state of ‘Jeevan Mukti’. Read verse 173 in which the meaning of Upadhi is given by Bhagwan. So, here he says a true Swami is only one who is liberated and now become the tree of peace, under the shelter of which can bask seekers of the path.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 78

Those who are always one with the Brahman are the Brahmacharis. Such a man may even belong to a pariah caste. One does not become a swami, by simply holding an ascetic’s wand in hand or by holding a copy of the Bhagavad Gita; nor by putting on red clothes; nor by discussing God with whomsoever he meets.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who are always merged with the Brahman (supreme) are the brahmacharis (celibate) and that such a man may even belong to a pariah caste (outcaste). On many occasions in the Chidakasha Gita, Bhagwan has spoken about one’s outer worldly discriminations not being the qualification for one’s worthiness for self-realisation. (see verse 21 & 61). Further, he warns about about the false adornments of the title of Swami by those who have not yet fully realised god.  He says that one does not become a Swami by simply holding an ascetic’s wand in hand nor by holding a copy of the Bhagwad Gita nor by putting on the red garb nor by discussing god with whomsoever he meets. The true qualities of a Swami/Sanyasi/Guru/Avadhoota/Paramahamsa he has also emphasised in verses 28, 37, 45, 52, 55, 61. The key line in all the verses are that a holy man is not by his external features but by his internal purity. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 79

If gold is melted in fire, it shines with luster; so also, one should purify oneself, killing desire and anger internally. By introspection, he should move internally. A man’s mind never remains stationary.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like when gold is melted in fire, it shines with luster, one should also purify oneself internally by killing desire and anger. For this, he says one should keep consistently introspecting internally because the mind is very fickle and does not stay stationary.

Additional Notes

What is introspection?

Introspection is self-inquiry or self-analysis or self-contemplation. Introspection encourages one to observe, identify and rectify one’s thoughts, words and deeds. Introspection can only happen if one is firstly motivated to improve or purify oneself. The quality of the introspection thus will depend directly on the quality intention or the bhavana to improvise or purify. Depending on the quality of intention, the quality of sincerity in the efforts to contemplate will reflect upon. Thus it is always beneficial to first check with the quality of intention behind it.

The ancient scriptures have highly recommended it on the spiritual path.

Physical Introspection – Watching your daily physical activities.

Mental Introspection – Observing your intellectual process

Vocal Introspection – Observing vocal activities and tones, speech, used words.

Self-introspection is a powerful tool as it aids in catching one’s own flaws. If one takes aside time, preferably at the end of the day, to simply sit and reflect honestly on the happenings during the day and observing one’s actions and reactions to incidents of the day, many facets can be revealed. This makes it possible for one to witness and observe how well one is walking the path. It helps one easily notice one’s flaws and take measures to avoid it in future, thus one by one eradicating a great deal of unconscious flaws. Self-introspection can catches those aspects of the mind that generally go unnoticed.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 80

However wicked a man may be, within five minutes his wickedness may be changed into goodness. So long as there are clouds, the sun’s rays are not visible. As soon as the clouds scatter in all directions, the sun becomes visible. OM is the ‘tower of peace’! OM is the ‘form of peace’! OM! Salutation to OMKAR!

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that however wicked a man may be, within a matter of 5 minutes his wickedness may be changed into goodness. He says that if clouds are there, it does not mean the sun is absent. It is only that the clouds are blocking the sun rays. So, the moment the clouds scatter in different directions, the sun rays becomes visible. Bhagwan points to a very important fact as to not judge anyone by their flaws. The Eternal Soul is the sun that is always shimmering divine light but it is due to the karmic clouds that this light is hidden. He thus reveals the possibility of even a sinner having a complete change, the moment the karmic influences clear. He says OM is the tower of peace, OM is the form of peace. OM is the first sound of life, the whole existence began with this sound and thus this pervades in every single soul. It is only a matter of time that this be revealed to the soul sooner or later. Salutations to Omkar. Aum!

Read more details on Omkar in verses 6 & 62.

Additional Notes

Stories that point out to this fact

There are countless stories that have happened in the vicinity of great self-realised Masters, where such complete turn-around has taken place, which stresses on this verse about the possibility of even the most wicked to turn completely saintly in just moments. This is one reason why the great Masters never judge anyone, for they clearly without doubt see the possibility of this fact. This is how the great Masters are able to be unaffected even by the wicked actions of the wicked, and thus able to forgive even the most wicked, for they are more interested in the possibility of the goodness of the wicked than the wickedness itself.

Jesus Christ was a great example of this. Even while he was being tortured and killed by the Romans, all that he had towards them was a great sense of compassion and love. Even at the moment before leaving his body, he only prayed to the Supreme Creator to forgive the sins of the “wicked” ones because he said they were not aware of what they were doing. Meaning, what they were doing were due to the impacts of the negative clouds of ignorance even though that was not their reality, for they too had the Source of Omkar in them, but were not aware of it yet. It is from this divine perspective that all great Masters are able to love anyone and everyone unconditionally. Judgement comes from duality and unconditional love comes from nonduality, which is the pure essence on which the Chidakasha Gita is based upon.

Similarly, there are many instances in the life of Jesus Christ where sinners completely transformed. Once all citizens crowded around a woman who was found guilty of adultery. According to their judgment, it was justice to kill such a woman by stoning them to death. The crowd had gathered with stones in their hands ready to stone here, while a few elders asked Jesus his opinion about this incident. Jesus simply said, “Let the man who has never sinned in his life throw the first stone.” It shook the whole crowd. One by one, they threw their stones and walked away. The woman who was shivering through this whole incident, looked at Jesus expecting rebuke from him, but Jesus only said, “Go your way, and sin no more.” She was completely transformed.

Lord Buddha’s story with the demonic man named Angulimala pronounces exactly this. Angulimala was a notorious wicked murderer who would kill travellers along the forest path and cut their thumbs to add into his garland of thumbs around his neck. His life was thickly clouded by his demonic karmic influences that made his dreadful actions completely normal to him. However, some probably good or great karmic substance was powerful enough to bring the Buddha himself into his vicinity one day in the isolated forest path. When he sprang before Buddha with his knife, he was completely shocked to find that the Buddha was as calm as a child would be in his mother’s arms. Finding that the Buddha without being perturbed at all continued to walk his way, the wicked man chased him yelling, “Stop!” Buddha only calmly replied, “I have stopped long back. When will you stop?” These words had profound effect on the wicked man and he immediately thew off his weapons and fell at the feet of the Buddha and followed him to the monastery. The King who was alerted on this incident, wanted Angulimala arrested, but was shocked to find him a completely changed man in the monastery. He said to the Buddha, “What our force and weapons could not do, you have done it without either!” Eventually, the changed Angulimala worked upon purging and purifying himself completely in Buddha’s vicinity and attaining self-realisation.

Similar are the stories where a robber who wanted to rob the diamond-studded begging bowl gifted by the Queen to the great saint Nagarjuna, experiences a complete transformation when he attempts to rob the saint. Another great story is where the notorious dacoit Ratnakar Daaku became Maharishi Valmiki!

All these stories point towards the great possibility of immediate transformation that Bhagwan emphasises upon in this verse.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 81

“There is not a fixed rule about the taking of food. It has not been said that one should not take his meals. Moderation! Moderation is the rule. Half stomach, food; one-fourth water; do not love sleep too much.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that there is no fixed rule for having food and that it has never been said that one should not take his meals. “Moderation!” says Bhagwan. He says moderation is the rule. He says that having food regularly is needed and there is no need to quit food on the path, but he says maintaining moderation in what you eat is a must. For that he recommends eating only half you stomach, one-fourth drinking water and the other one-fourth to be left empty. He also alerts moderation in sleep too by avoiding over-indulgence in sleep.

Additional Notes

How to go about the food moderation?

Bhagwan advises eating only one-fourth the size of your stomach. The size of your stomach is the size of a clenched fist, so accordingly the quantity of food can be calculated. One-fourth he advises to be left for water and one-fourth he advises to be left empty. The empty space is for gas and space that will allow the whole food to be digested properly for the utilisation of the body needs. This is his equation for moderation of food intake. Food taken more than this could be considered unhealthy, especially filling the stomach to the full. When the stomach is filled, there is no enough space for the food to digest. It can be compared to what would happen if a mixer jar is filled to the brim and if it is put on. The mixer can mix well only if enough space is left in the jar.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 82

Fire consumes anything and everything. It does not distinguish between good and bad. Likewise those who are doing “karma” may eat anything. Those who do not know what “karma” is are not aware of what they should do. Such a one suffers from indigestion. One whose digestion is all right may eat anything he likes. It will be digested. Sleep is necessary; moderate sleep. Do not eat when the stomach is full. Be always regular in your meals.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that fire has the capacity to consume anything and everything without distinguishing between good and bad. Similarly, he says those doing karma (with pure intentions and in pure awareness)  may eat anything and no harm will come to them. By “eat” he says mean doing any karma. Meaning, it is not the karma (good or bad) but the intentions behind it that makes it good or bad. The fruits of the action does not really depend upon what the action may be termed as (good or bad) but the fruits of that action is the direct outcome of the intention behind the action. For example, we may say that telling lies is bad and telling the truth is good. However, the outcome of telling a lie to save someone’s life is completely different from speaking a truth that causes someone his life. In this case, the truth can bring a negative karmic effect and the lie can bring a positive outcome.

Bhagwan says that fire has the capacity to consume anything and everything without distinguishing between good and bad. Similarly, he says those doing karma (with pure intentions and in pure awareness) may do the karma (good or bad) and and it will be digestible. Meaning, it is not how the karma (good or bad) is defined that makes it digestible (doable) but the intentions behind it that makes it good or bad. The fruits of the action does not really depend upon what the action may be termed as (good or bad) but the fruits of that action is the direct outcome of the intentions (good or bad) behind the action. For example, we may say that telling lies is bad and telling the truth is good. However, the outcome of telling a lie to save someone’s life is a merit than speaking a truth that may cause someone his life. In this case, the lie has brought a positive karmic effect whereas truth has brought a negative karmic outcome.

Eating street food or fast food may look very normal and maybe even “perfectly fine” according to social trends or norms, but since the act of eating it is not a conscious choice and not done in awareness, it can end up in indigestion and ill health. So Bhagwan says that those who do not know what karma actually is, are not really aware of what they should do and such a one suffers from indigestion.

He says, just like the one whose digestion is powerful can easily digest any food he eats, the one whose intention is pure and does any karma being fully aware of it, brings him no harm. An Avadhoota is a perfect example of this. He even hurls the filthiest of abuse or may do such acts that are condemned completely sinful but it is not the acting by the definition of any karma but purely for the highest intent behind it. There is an incident where Bhagwan once touched the breast of a woman, who was aghast and made a hue and cry. A lot was spoken on this indecent act of Bhagwan and he was badly abused by the people, who only looked at the act, but not the intent. Only later was it realized that the woman was cured of the malignancy of her breast after that incident.

Finally, he says that sleep is important but it should be moderate, neither less nor more. He says one should not eat when the stomach is full and eat only when hungry. He asks to be regular in taking meals.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 83

Gold chains around the neck; gold jewels on the ears; gold rings on fingers. These are the causes of the fear of being robbed when they are on the body. Money is the cause of fear. When there is no gold on the body, then there is no fear.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the gold chains worn around the neck and the gold jewels worn on the ears and gold rings worn on the fingers are the cause of fear of being robbed when they adorn the body. Hence, money is the cause of the fear of being robbed. When there is no gold on the body, there is no fear.

The person who walks with lots of money and gold is always anxious, restless and dreadful all the time due to the constant fear of being robbed, not realising that the cause of his fear is not robbers but the gold and money. The person who walks without any money or gold walks in peace for he has nothing to fear of being robbed of. Similarly, the one who is in the dual consciousness has always something to be scared of – of losing his possessions, honor, relations, and even life. The constant fear of death looms over him. He is constantly suffering trying to protect everything and lives in constant fear of losing. This is what the dual consciousness of maya can do. But a man who is living in nonduality sees nothing as separate and knows his eternal state, having nothing to gain or nothing to lose, and thus live in no fear, like the little children – free and happy.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 84

“What is called ‘fear’ is the creation of the mind; for the internal sight, there is no fear. Fear exists to the man who has no internal eye. It is impossible for a blind man to describe what the cart is like. Similarly to a man who has no guru, there is no place in the world.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that fear is nothing but the creation of the mind gathered through the projections of the external eyes and its perceptions, but the internal sight has no fear. He says fear exists in the man who has no internal eye. Internal eye means one who with the inner wisdom of the inner eyes see what the truth is. What the external eyes sees and is fearful of, the inner eyes knows that everything in the dual world is an illusion and thus not real. Just like it is impossible for a blind man to describe what a cart looks like, it is impossible for a man without a guru to see the reality behind the illusions of fear. He says a man who has no guru has no place in the world, because without a guru, this inner eyes cannot be activated. A guru is the one who awakens his inner sight and inner wisdom and brings him out of the illusory world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 85

“Food full means ‘prana full’. Food means ‘prana’. If we store our money in a box without much thought about it, it remains in a great store. If we spend from it, it becomes less and less. Money is life (prana); the box is intellect (buddhi). The box requires nothing. Similarly, if a man knows himself, he does not want anything. If by the internal exercise of the sadhana (practice) which is with us, we lead the prana to the Brahmarandhra, and there if Prana and Shiva are united, then we do not require anything. Restraining the manas (mind) from going down and showing it the royal road of the ‘middle path’ is what is called food.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that food is nothing but prana, which is the natural ingredient of food that we take from outside into the body. Prana is the life-giving source of life. So he says, ‘food full means prana full’ and also says ‘food means prana’. He compares prana to be as precious as money is for a human being and so he says that if we store our money in a box without giving much thought about it, it remains stored in the box. Here he is comparing money to prana and human intellect to the box. So he says that if the money is spent, it becomes lesser and lesser. The box (intellect) requires nothing. Similarly, if a man knows himself (about these secrets) then he does not want anything. Meaning, he becomes independant of the need for food or other lower desires. He says that if by the internal practices of sadhana, which is pulling up of the prana from the lower centers to the Brahmarandhra (sahasrar), and there if the prana and Shiva are united, then we do not require anything. These details of sadhna, Brahmarandhra and uniting of prana and Shiva are all explained in great detail in the previous verse insights – in verses 2, 53, 56, 58, 59, & 69). He concludes by saying that the mind has to be retrained to come down from this level, but instead shown the royal road of the middle path. Middle path is the path of moderation. In verse 33 it has been explained as to what the royal road is about. So he says that not allowing the mind to fall prey to lusting for food anything more than just for the need of prana is possible by not allowing the mind to move towards the lower desires but by directing the mind towards the middle path is what is real food.

Additional Notes

How is prana a replacement for food?

Prana is the life-giving force present in the entire cosmos and life can only thrive if there is prana. Similarly, human beings also thrive on prana just like other living beings. A plant, tree, animal , reptile, and insect also thrives on prana. All beings that have a mouth and digestive system are designed to take in food that contains prana. When an tiger eats a deer, it is consuming nothing else but the prana that is existing in the flesh of the deer. Now, how did the deer get that prana? By eating grass and plants that are filled with prana. How did plants receive prana? Through a process called photosynthesis – from sunlight, water, soil and, air. After consuming the food, each body of the organism is specifically designed to extract the prana for its own sustenance. In humans and animals we call that process digestion, assimilation and absorption and the rest is thrown out as waste. Interestingly, it is only the human being which has been gifted with the understanding of this process and with the choice to avoid this big tedious process of consumption, digestion, etc and rather draw the prana directly for one’s higher goals of life.

It is important to note that not everyone becomes aware of this until the individual activates the higher desires. For it is only with higher seeking, that such details will be known to the seeker and he will strive to achieve it. Because unless one has the higher seeking the lower desires will not allow this to become a reality. Meaning, if the higher desires of spiritual evolution and liberation is not strong, there will naturally not be a great inclination of even desire to let go off the need for the major dependency on food. Cravings for food and pleasure will naturally pull down the human to chase food and remain engrossed in it, forgetting the higher goals of life. When higher seeking is activated, the practitioner will timely receive all guidance and wisdom and even the necessary paths and teachers who can guide him on the path of raising the prana from lower chakras to higher chakras, which is what this verse is trying to explain. When the prana is pulled towards the highest point (Brahmarandhra) and it remains there, there would be no interest in any of the lower desires of the lower chakras. Consciousness moves with prana. If prana is in lower chakras consciousness is lower states and when prana moves to higher chakras consciousness is in higher states. That is how the wants and desires naturally reflect in a human.

Moreover, when prana is in higher centers, there is hardly any loss of it. It must be noted that prana is the fuel for humans. For literally anything and everything prana is discharged – be it movement, activity, passion, negative emotions, and even thought needs prana. But for a yogi who is away from desires and established in the higher states, hardly requires any prana, and now since he knows the art of drawing prana directly from nature (through pranayama and other breathwork), he lives on very little or no food at all. In this verse, Bhagwan reflects all these details very beautifully.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 86

The repetition of Rama is true delight; it is the eternal atma delight; Kundalini grandeur delight. The lord of mind is Rama. Rama means atman (soul). That which governs the 10 indriyas (sense organs) is Rama. Ravana means all the wicked qualities in us. Sita means Chitta (mind/conscience). Lakshmana means attention (awareness). Krishna means introspection. This introspection is the eternal atma delight.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the repetition of the word “Rama” is true delight, the delight of the eternal soul and the magnificence of the Kundalini power. It must be noted closely that Bhagwan in this verse is not referring to Rama, the dual form, but he is revealing the true metaphors of all the characters played in the Ramayana, which have deep relevance to the journey of our soul. It is timely right, in this verse, to mention how the Ramayana revealed to the great Sage Valmiki was all about the play of consciousness and each character and story in the Ramayana opens the secret doors to the realms of life and beyond. So this verse is completely about the nondual aspect of Ramayana. This is why Bhagwan reveals that the word Rama is not just a word but an essence because Rama represents our soul, thus reveals the eternal delight of the soul and reveals the splendour of even the Kundalini shakti getting activated upon one’s merging with true essence of “Rama”. Further, he reveals that Rama actually means the atman (soul/consciousness). He reveals that Sita is means Chitta (mind/conscience), which is why he also refers Rama (consciousness) as the Lord of the mind (Sita). He also states that, that which governs the 10 indriyas (sense organs) is Rama (consciousness). The 10 indriyas consists of 5 gyanendriyas (sensory organs) and 5 karmendriyas (action organs). Then, he reveals that Ravana is nothing but the wicked qualities in us. There are 10 major evil qualities in humans – Kama (lust), Krodha (anger), Moha (delusion), Lobha (greed), Mada (pride), Maatsyasya (envy), Manas (fickleness of mind), Buddhi (dull intellect), Chitta (lack of will) and Ahamkara ( ego). These 10 evils qualities symbolise the 10 heads of Ravana. Then, he reveals that Lakshmana is our attention or awareness (see additional notes below for full description). Further, he reveals Lord Krishna symbolised as introspection (using discriminative powers of the buddhi or intellect). And he thus says that this introspection is the eternal delight of the soul.

Additional Notes

More revelations into the deep symbolic expressions of Ramayana

Lord Rama is the soul consciousness, the Lord of Sita, who is the mind. The mind needs to be merged into the soul, which is why Rama and Sita are married. However, the whole play of consciousness is because the mind moves far away from the soul and this is what the whole Ramayana is about. Rama (the soul) is aware of this and thus keeps the mind (Sita) protected. When Rama and Sita go into exile and move into the forest (depicts the soul journey into the world of duality and illusions and thus challenges). Rama and Sita (soul and mind) do not move alone after the exile but is always accompanied by Lakshmana (awareness). When a time arrives that Sita (mind) has to remain alone in the forest, Rama (soul) knew about the challenges with him distancing from the mind and thus he instructs Lakshmana (awareness) to be protect. Thus the awareness watches over the mind at all times. But then comes a time when the awareness also has to distance and that is when Lakshmana (awareness) warns Sita (mind) not to step out of the hut in any circumstances and draws a Lakshman-rekha, a circle around the hut, telling Sita that she is well protected if she remains within the circle. The circle symbolises the vortex of divine connection through which the mind can remain connected with the soul consciousness, and thus still remain safe. But the moment awareness (Lakshmana) leaves, the mind (Sita) becomes vulnerable to the lures, challenges, deceptions of the maya world. Ravana (10 evil qualities) is now ready to capture the mind (Sita) because it knows the mind has a better chance of vulnerability if the soul consciousness and awareness are distanced from it. Ravana (the evil tendencies of lust, anger, delusion, greed, pride, envy, fickle mind, dull intellect, ill will, and the ego) now comes to lure Sita. But because he knows that Sita (mind) is strong and within the protection of the divine vortex (Lakshmana rekha), he changes his form into a alm-seeking monk. This deeply denotes how the evil tendencies of the mind have the capacity to lure the mind by justifying something as good to the mind. Ravana took advantage of Sita’s pious quality of never refusing alms to a monk. That is how she steps out of the vortex, after which Ravana immediately captures Sita and takes here away. It denotes the mind’s need to remain connected to the soul consciousness always through awareness, and when in the absence of awareness (Lakshman) she steps out of the vortex, the evil tendencies gain control over the mind and capture it, enslaving the mind. The evil tendencies now keeps the mind in captivity like what precisely Ravana did to Sita in Lanka. The mind (Sita) now craves and strives to be reunited with the Soul (Rama) but in vain, because of the absence of Lakshmana (awareness). On the other hand, the soul (Rama) is incomplete with the mind taken away and does everything to win it back from the clutches of the evil. All the challenges that Rama faced till he traces Sita are the challenges of the soul in the play of consciousness. Hanuman is the symbolic term for breath, that is why he is referred to as Vayu (air/breath) putra. So Rama (soul) with the help of the breath (Hanuman) finally reaches the mind (Sita) and soon the breath (Hanuman) burns away all the negative tendencies (Lanka) and helps win over Ravana and reunite Sita (mind) with Rama (soul). This is the pure nondual aspect hidden behind the dual aspect of Ramayana, which in this verse Bhagwan spills out, for the Chidakasha Gita stresses on leaving duality by transcending it and being one with the highest truth of nonduality.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 87

All are men. There is no incarnation higher than man. Man is the greatest of animals. But those are the best of men who ponder over the subtle.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that there is no incarnation higher than man and that man is the greatest of all living beings, which is why he is saying “all are men”, meaning that since a human being carries the highest awareness of god consciousness, he is actually present in all beings. It is only that not all men get to become aware of this truth, which is why he says those are the best of humans who are able to ponder over this subtle truth of who they really are.

Many scriptures have thus emphasised the importance of humans not forgetting the fortune of being blessed by a human birth. Saint Tulsidas thus in Ramacharitra Manas says, “Bade bhaag manushya tann paava, Sur durlabh sab granth nigaava.” Meaning, “It is by the virtue of great fortune that one has been blessed with a human birth, as all scriptures teach, how difficult it is even for the angels to incarnate as humans.”

Thus this verse stresses the importance of one remembering this truth and working towards liberation without which the human incarnation can be considered a waste, which one cannot be sure if will receive anytime soon again.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 88

Ekadashi means the worship of the ‘ONE’. To such a man, every day is Ekadashi. Those are called ‘men’ who have such an Ekadashi. A man should think very little about the gross. He should spend much of his time in meditation of the subtle.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

The Chidakasha Gita is all about nonduality. Many of the dual beliefs and rituals have been decoded in the book through many verses of Bhagwan. In this verse, Bhagwan says connects with nonduality again by bringing in the popular dual subject of ‘ekadashi’. He says ekadashi is worship of the one (nondual). He adds that to such a one who has realised this, everyday is an ekadashi. He says such ones are real ‘men’, meaning such are the real conscious human beings. He further says that man should think very little about the gross and must spend much of his time in meditation of the subtle. Again, gross is dual and subtle is nondual.

Additional Notes

What is the significance of Ekadashi?

Since eons, humans have followed the practices of Ekadashi and most popular practice has been the Ekadashi fasting. However, a larger percentage who follow this custom out of belief or tradition remain unaware of what is Ekadashi about and what is the significance behind the fasting.

Ekadashi happens twice in a month and is linked with the lunar (moon) cycles. Ekadashi is the 11th day after a full moon and 11th day after a new moon. These are the two days of the month where the human bodies can easily tune in to inner awareness and access higher dimensions of life, for which the system (human body) needs to be kept empty, devoid of food. That is the reason why the Ekadashi fasting is done, where people are supposed to fast whole day, right from breakfast and break the fast on the next morning. Many keep dry fast for 24 hours, that is, without even water intake, while many water-fast, while many eat only fruits, while many others eat very light like rice gruel, rice porridge or vegetable juice or boiled vegetables, etc. Keeping the gross body light and empty allows one to connect easily with the subtle, which is what Bhagwan is referring to in this verse when he says, “man should think very little about the gross and spend more time in meditation of the subtle..” Fasting with this awareness and remaining connected with the subtle on this day is what actually makes a successful and meaningful Ekadashi. Gradually, as one progresses and becomes more aware of the subtle, he begins attunes more with the ONE until everyday becomes an Ekadashi for him, and this is what Bhagwan is referring to in the beginning of the verse.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 89

A man becomes ‘desireless’ when he sees a dead body burning. This desirelessness is temporary. This is the secret of the body. Desirelessness imparted by a guru should not be abandoned. From desirelessness a man obtains liberation from bondage. This desirelessness is the best. Guru is secondary. The desire that a man be initiated is of the third class. Getting a guru is of the second class. By practice; getting experience for oneself is the real desirelessness which is the goal of human life. When one practices and imparts his knowledge to another, it is “Yogananda Desirelessness”. It is the imperishable and the indivisible state, it is the tree of peace. The climbing of the tree of peace which is in the head and being one with that “peace tree” is the real imperishable desirelessness. The cutting of the primary root of passion and anger is the imperishable desirelessness. Being in Samsara, enjoying a little of its pleasures and then renouncing it is the second desirelessness. Desirelessness is liberation from bondage in this very life.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan talks of the times when one becomes suddenly desireless when they see a cremation or witness a dead body. Suddenly he begins pondering over the temporary states of life and becoming aware that one day he too has to leave, he finds himself devoid of desires. Bhagwan says such desirelessness is only temporary. The scriptures speak of such detachment as “Smashana Vairagya” meaning “aversion happening in a cremation ground” that lasts for a few days only and then man gets back to his desires. He says that this is the secret of the body, meaning this is the ultimate truth of the body. But he says that the desirelessness that one acquires from a Guru should not be forsaken, for it is from this true desirelessness that one can truly attain liberation from the bondage of attachments through desires. He says such a desirelessness is the best. He says that even then Guru is secondary. He rates such a desirelessness is of first stage, and Guru is the second stage. He further says that the desire to get initiated is still of third class. Then, getting a Guru is of second class. But, by practice when one achieves this desirelessness, that is the first class, and this must be the goal of human life. He says that when one practices and achieves such desirelessness and then imparts this wisdom to others, then it is “Yogananda Vairagya” (detachment experienced through the bliss of divine union). He says this is imperishable and the indivisible state and is the tree of peace. He says climbing that tree of peace situated in the head, and merging with that ‘tree of peace’ is the state of vairagya (detachment) that can never perish. (Read verse 77 on ‘tree of peace’). Next, he reveals what is this imperishable desirelessness – he says, it is the uprooting the primary roots of passion and anger. He says, being in Samsara (world) and enjoying a little of its pleasure and then renouncing it after some adversity is still secondary desirelessness. He ends the verse stating that desirelessness is the liberation from bondages in this very life itself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 90

Those who have no ‘faith’ have no desirelessness. Similarly, those who have annihilated the manas (mind), have no vasanas (tendencies). So also, those who have no faith, do not reap any fruit. We buy a diamond for five or six thousand rupees; this is all mental delusion. If we have no mind to buy a diamond, its value is nothing more than that of a lump of earth.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that without faith there can be no desirelessness. Faith in the self, faith in the god principle functioning through the self.  He says those who have no faith, do not reap the fruits. In just the previous verse Bhagwan spoke about how self-determined and achieved desirelessness is the greatest, and this can be achieved only if one has faith in oneself and the cosmic intelligence. Only through this faith, effort is possible and through effort is possible the attainment of the wisdom and actions towards the achievement of the state of desirelessness. He thus says that those who have annihilated or transcended the mind, have no vasanas (mental tendencies) left. It is from vasanas that all passion and desires arise from. So, again, as stressed by Bhagwan multiple times in the Chidakasha Gita that mind is the cause of all challenges and transcending the mind should be one’s main aim in life. He gives an example of one buying a diamond worth thousands of rupees (now crores), which they are willing to pay such high prices only because of a mental delusion. It is just the delusion of diamond having been pronounced as the rarest stone, and therefore its price. It is nothing but a stone, but its price tag comes along just because that stone is rarely found. What else can this be than mental delusion? For once the delusion is convinced upon the mind, the mind starts craving for it. So he says that if one has ‘no mind to buy a diamond’, the diamond is nothing but a lump of earth to such a person.

Additional Notes

Dealing with your Vasanas, Samskaras & Karma?

In the beautiful example of how a diamond becomes a mental delusion to the mind clearly indicates how all the cravings in the mind begin with such delusions. What the mind perceives, it believes and thus creates longing, craving, aversions. It is all mind’s play. Such cravings become tendencies or vasanas. Vasana means the ‘seed of desire’. There are countless such seeds in the mind of an average person from where every now and then keep sprouting various desires. You are walking on the street and see something beautiful in a shop and from within arises are desire to possess it. That is a desire but from where the desire has sprouted from is the seed, which is vasana. The plant that grows out of this seed (vasana) is called a samskara. You might pass that shop and even have travelled miles away from that object you saw, but if that continues to create mental waves of desires continuously, that intense desire now to possess it is called the samskara. So, vasana is something that is deep-rooted as a seed. When touched, it springs up desires and when you keep watering that desire, it turns into a samskara. Samskaras get strengthened by remembering and repeated pondering. Now, driven by that samskara, the action that you perform is called karma. So you buying that thing is the karma. What fanned buying it was the samskara. What caused the samkara was the seed of vasana.

Also, whenever anything is left half done, it automatically creates a samskara in your inner space, which then begins to urge you to repeat that action (because of its incompletion). Addictions happen due to samskaras. That is why in many spiritual practices, practitioners are encouraged to give completion to their samskaras but completing anything that remains stuck in their psyche as incomplete. It may even be a suppressed emotion of anger, hate, pain, lust, fear, etc, that keeps bringing back the person to those emotions again and again because it was not fully expressed. Thus, when the practitioner now with this state of awareness faces that emotion or desire and gives it a full completion, the samskara is released. This is why in some practices, people are encouraged to feel deeply their anger and express it out by shouting, punching a pillow, dancing, crying, etc. This is the science behind the release of the samskaras. Whereas people instead take medications, which only suppresses the symptoms further adding agony to the person.

Some tips to consciously release your vasanas and samskaras in awareness

Shifting Into Awareness is the key. But almost all the time we miss the opportunity. The first step towards this self-healing process is practice awareness. Only if you are aware, you will be able to catch the right moment to heal it. It is important to understand that when we try to deal with healing ourselves, we are most of the time not ready and thus it becomes even more difficult. If you sit to meditate and dig out your samskaras/vasanas, it might not be very easy to go that deep. So the best method that i have experienced is to be in aware of what is going on with you all the time. Being in awareness all day long is being ready to convert a trigger into an opportunity to heal. There are countless times every single day, these vasanas and samskaras act up but we miss the opportunity to work on it because we are not aware. Let us say someone says something and you get upset. Normally, the mind falls into the same repeated pattern of getting triggered by the person and attacking back the person either personally or mentally. Mentally, it is more harmful because one is not fully able to express that anger back and thus the more they think of it the more they strengthen the samskara. Whereas, if you are someone who practices awareness, such a moment is the golden time to heal, because this samskara is fully active now (this state may not even be possible to be brought up in meditation). So, you now become aware of this samskara. Remember, when you consciously become aware of a samksara, it has lost most of its power because now you are very maturely and consciously watching it, rather than just blindly reacting. So, now consciously, you allow that emotion not to be suppressed or thrown back at that someone, but allow it to fill you up completely. You are giving it completion now. Feel fully that emotion and go with what happens. If you feel like crying, cry it out, if you feel like shouting shout it out, if you feel like punching, punch out on a pillow or cushion or bag or simply in the air, and do it all without a second thought. It may not be possible to do all this everywhere, but remember its an opportunity that you want to convert into the best possibility, whatever. Once you give a completion, that is carry out that emotion fully, you will find yourself relaxed after that action. The emotion will subside and are peaceful feeling will come over, then know that the samskara has been weakened or diminished. However, if you wish to go deeper into releasing the vasana from where those samskaras are showing up, then whenever such moment of trigger happen, close your eyes, feel the emotion fully and allow it to fully fill you up, however unpleasant it may feel. Stay with it and ask your mind to show you or reach you or hint you towards the original cause of that emotion. It is important to remember that the person who upset you is not the original, but just a reflection or someone who just triggered you towards something that is old and deeply hidden within you as a vasana. So when you, in awareness, ask your inner self to guide you to the original, there may be a flash of image, or a flash of thought or a memory or a sound or word or something that will hint you. Follow to that first impression of whatever shows up and go directly into it and relive that moment. It may be some old trauma, maybe even something that happened in your childhood, that got rooted deeply as a strong psychic impression. Relive that moment maturely in awareness. The awareness will dissolve that incident as you give a completion to it. Stay with it as long as you feel like and come back to a state of relaxation. Clearing vasanas is clearing deep-rooted desires. So, these are conscious ways of dealing with deep-rooted vasanas/samskaras and clearing them, so as to bring in the state of desirelessness or natural vairagya.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 91

Elements are not five but four. Earth, water, fire and air; space is no element; it is one indivisible. The earth is extended; air is above water; space is above air. The sea is the boundary, the earth is the bed, space is the house. The air is above, the earth is below. The earth is red, the air is white. The earth, made of four elements is not round; it is triangular; between the lunar nerve and the solar nerve is Sushumna (the star nerve); the earth is like our face.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that elements are not 5 but 4 – the earth, water, fire and air. He is not considering the space because he says space is not an element as it is one indivisible.  Ancient Greek philosophers also talk on of these four elements of what earth (nature) is made up of. He mentions the sequence of construction of nature – the extended earth that holds water, above water is air, and above air is space. He says the sea surrounds the earth like a boundary and earth is the bed to the waters too (bottom of ocean is the ocean bed – earth. Bottom of river is the river bed – earth). The air is above and earth is below and the space houses the entire 4 elements in this sequence. He describes the colour of the earth to be red and colour of air to be white.

He then compares the earth with the human face, stating that earth is not round but triangular. This triangle is being pointed towards the downward-pointing triangle in the Agna chakra, which is known as the “bhrumadhya” or the ‘third eye’. The downward pointing triangle symbolises duality or the creation.  At this bhrumadhya ends the lunar nerve (Ida nadi) and solar nerve (Pingala nadi) in the middle of this triangle (more details on this in verses 2 & 3).

Interestingly, the symbol of earth also is triangle, and the 8th avarna of the Sri Chakra, which is at the sahasrara is also called the trikona (triangle).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 92

Vayu (air) is imperishable; it is one, indivisible. It exists in everything. When the glass chimney of a lamp is shut, there is no light. When it is not shut, the lamp shines brightly. If we take “earth” and imagine it to be sugar, it is sugar only in thought. The nature of earth is not changed. So also, even if a man becomes a Yogi or a Jnani, the nature of the body does not leave him. Manas becomes one with the Brahman; not the body. Jnanis are subject to the limitations of the body. Since their Manas is annihilated, they are not aware of their bodily condition. A man in sleep, if bitten by a cobra, is not aware of the cobra bite and he is not affected by it. Similarly, Jnanis are not aware of their body and hence, the bodily conditions do not affect them. When a letter, written in English or in any tongue, is given to a child of five or six months old, the child throws away that letter and it cannot know what is contained in it. A child of six months old does not at all know the difference between a diamond and a lump of earth. Such children have no idea of the body. They are always in the thought of Atma. Children have no idea of duality. When their brains develop, they become aware of differences. When the brain is not developed, Prana in such a child is in the Sushumna.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Vayu (air) cannot be divided as it is indivisible and imperishable, and exists in everything. Similarly, the consciousness is indivisible, imperishable and exists in everything. He gives an example of the olden days glass chimney. If the glass chimney would be shut tightly the lamp would get put off because of the lack of air to burn. He thus says that if you shut the glass of the lamp chimney, there is no light and when it is not shut, the flame shines brightly. He is pointing to the important role the elements of nature play in order to sustain the human body, be it even the body of a realised being. He says if you take earth and imagine it to be sugar, it is sugar only in thought, but the nature of earth does not change. Similarly, he says, that even if a man becomes a Yogi or Jnani (self-realised), the nature of his body does not leave him – the elements will function as per its nature. The mind of the Jnani has become one with the Brahman but not the body. Even the self-realised (Jnanis) are subject to the limitations of the body. It is only because their minds are annihilated that they are not aware of the limitations or challenges of the bodily conditions. He says a man in deep sleep if bitten by a cobra is not even aware of it. Similarly, Jnanis are not aware of their body and hence the bodily conditions do not affect them. He says if a letter that is written in English or any other language is given to a 5-6-month-old child, the child will simply throw it away as it will not even know what are the contents of the letter. A 6-month-old child does not know the difference between a diamond and a lump of earth. Such children do not have any idea about their bodies because they are always in the thought of atma (soul). Children thus have no idea of duality. It is only when they grow and their brains develop that they become aware of differences (duality). When the brain is not developed, the prana of the child remains centered in the Sushumna.

Additional Notes

The consciousness of little children

When a child is born it is completely aware of who it is, from where has it come from and where is it proceeding in this life journey. It is fully aware of who its parents are, who its family members are and what is its link with the previous birth. This is the time the child cries, laughs and expresses various true emotions as reflections of its inner awareness. A little child may seem to laugh or cry without any valid reason to an adult who is watching it, but the child is only expressing what it sees and feels. It may cry inconsolably due to fear or distress when remembers its past karmic influences that brought it to this life and the life situations it has to face in this lifetime. We have a false impression that the child knows nothing as it has just come into the world and we know everything because of our decades of earthly experiences. It is actually the other way round. The new-born child’s psychic abilities are fully active and thus it can read through anyone’s mind and ‘see through’ other people’s realities. The little child is thus still in the nondual state that it has arrived from and thus cannot understand the dualities or any differences, which Bhagwan points out with examples of how great language or words mean nothing to it nor can it differentiate between a diamond and stone. Thus the child is always rooted in soul consciousness and thus they have no awareness of the body. The body that is made of the four elements continue to work according to its nature, while the child is only aware of consciousness. This is exactly the state of the Jnanis or Avadhootas, where they don’t even feel bodily shame if they are naked, just like the little child. They have both no body consciousness.

And then begins the training of the human beings around the child, where they start feeding the child with all the dualistic properties and as the child’s brain develops, it becomes more aware of the dual world and lesser and lesser aware of the nondual. By the age of 7, the child is now completely brain washed into the world of maya, and it now forgets it’s true nature. Based on the samskaras, vasanas it has brought forth from its previous life, it now begins playing out those tendencies and thus fully enters into the ‘samsara’. Hence, the first 7 years of a child is very crucial. This is why the Greek philosopher Aristotle once said, “Give me a child until he is 7 and I will show you the man.” For the child can be conditioned in any way during these crucial years of upbringing and that is how the child will function for the rest of his life. This is precisely the reason why many spiritual schools like to ensure that the child till 7 years remain in an environment where they can be moulded and groomed to specific goals.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 93

As the child is growing month by month, it gets knowledge of various things. Earlier knowledge is of no use. When a man is in the know of all, he must be like a child. A true Jnani is just like a child of six months. Such a child is not conscious of its own calls of nature. It does not distinguish between the two calls of nature. Jnanis are similar. They do not like one thing and dislike the other. They have no idea of poison. The administrator of poison should think about it. The eater (Jnanis) never cares for it. Likewise, a Jnani does not say, “I want dinner”, “I want that”. They are always well established in the internal Atman.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that as the new-born child grows month by month, it keeps acquiring various knowledge of the external world, which then start becoming part of its samskaras. The earlier knowlege it possessed becomes useless. Bhagwan says that when the man is in the know of all (realises the ultimate truth), he actually becomes a child. He says a true Jnani (self-realised) is just like a 6-month-old baby, who is not even conscious of its own urge for passing urine or stools.  It is completely oblivious of it’s bodily requirements like covering it up, feeding itself when hungry or thirsty, or any such bodily activities. It cannot even differentiate between the two calls of nature. Bhagwan says Jnanis are exactly the same, who cannot differentiate between any duality. They have no like (craving) towards one thing or dislike (aversion) towards another thing. They don’t even have any idea of what is poisonous to them. The administrator (one who gives the poison) is the one who knows the difference but the eater (Jnani) never is bothered about it. Similarly, a Jnani does not even say “I want dinner” or “I want this… or that…” because there is no selectiveness on anything. They remain simply absorbed in the eternal Atman (self).

Additional Notes

The state of Avadhootas

This verse simply gives a clear understanding of the states of Bhagwan himself and a good understanding of the states of the wandering Avadhootas, who are completely lost in a nondual world with absolutely no selectiveness about anything, nor an opinion, nor anything with good or bad or even a thought about it. They are simply fully centered in the present “now” moment, in total union with everything in the cosmos (advaita), connected with everything in their omnipresent state.

This verse is exactly pointing to what Jesus Christ said, “Assuredly, I say to you, unless you change and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven.” This was very much misunderstood and confusing to many, but if you refer to this verse of Chidakasha Gita, it becomes crystal clear that Jesus also was talking about an adult striving to achieve the inner state of a little child – pure, honest, transparent, simple, blissful, fully in the present, nondual.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 94

“Our head is like a coconut fruit. In the coconut there is water and kernel. Likewise, there is water and kernel in our head. In the head is “Chidakasha”. It is the well of “Hridayakasha”. We should draw water from this well and drink it. It is no use digging a well in the earth and drinking water from it. What we call the “heart” is not below; it is above (the neck). When we are cooking, the flames go upwards; so is the heart upwards. There is light in the heart; there is no darkness in it. If a man’s head be struck off, we cannot say who the man is by simply looking at his trunk. It is the heart which sees through the eye. A man must have the internal eye. What is called the “heart space” is the face which is triangular. We can know a certain man by looking at his face. A man must know his own secret. A man must know himself.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that our head is like a coconut. The water and kernel in a coconut resembles the water and kernel in our head. He calls the outer bone of the skull as the kernel and the water in it he refers to the space in the head as the “Chidakasha” (eternal sky).  He calls the head the well of ‘Hridayakasha” (heart space) and that one must draw the water from this well and drink from it. He is referring to drinking the nectar from this head space that produces the eternal nectar of eternal life (read insights of verse 22 & 69 to know about drinking the ambrosial nectar). He thus says it is of no use digging wells here and there and drinking from it. Meaning, this thirst from the earthly water will quench thirst only temporarily but drinking the eternal water from the eternal well of Chidakasha will give eternal life. He then says what we normally refer to as the ‘heart’ is not what is in the chest, but the real ‘heart’ is above the neck. He is referring to the third eye (Agna chakra) as the heart space (the pineal gland produces this eternal nectar in this space – read verse 22 & 69 for details). He refers to the flame in this heart space just as the cooking flame that rises upwards. He says in this heart space there is no darkness but light, where this eternal flame is constantly rising upwards towards the Sahasrar. He says if the head is struck off one cannot determine the identity of the person by only looking at the rest of the body, the head is such an important space of the whole existence of man. He says it is the heart that sees through the eye and man must have this internal eye. The internal eye is the third eye. So he says it is the heart that sees through this internal eye. He says what is called the ‘heart space’ is the face which is triangular (see verse 91) because he says a man’s identity is known only when you look at the face. In fact, Bhagwan means deeper because then next he says that a man must know this secret; man must known himself. For only a man who knows this secret and truly knows himself can know others just by looking at their face!

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 95

You have a certain thing in your hand; if you look for it somewhere else, you will not find it. If you sit in an upper-storey, light a lamp there, and close the doors, those who are below cannot see the light. ‘See the bioscope!’ ‘See the drama!’ – all these are seen in the head. Everything should be seen from the same place; you need not go to several places to see several things. The city of Madras can be seen from there as well as from here. It is better to see it from one place. We must ‘idealize’ it in our brain.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if you sit in an upper storey building with the doors closed and light a lamp up in the room there, the light cannot be seen by those below. Similarly, when something is seen in the Hridayaakasha or Chidakasha (heart space in the head) it can be only seen by the one who heart space it is and not by any other. So, he says that when you have something in your hand and if you search for it elsewhere you are not going to find it. Meaning, we search for everything externally, when in reality it all exists within our chidakasha itself, which is where we must seek and not outside. So, he says to see the bioscope and see all the drama (play of consciousness) in the bioscope (within the head) itself. Bioscope was an instrument popular in those days that was a projector within which were run a series of films, which were very eagerly watched by children those days. One had to peep into the bioscope box within which they could see the whole play. Bhagwan refers this bioscope to our head, within the space (chidakasha) one should see all the play. He says all these are possible to be seen in the head without the need to go physically to different places. He says the city of Madras (Chennai) can be seen by being physically in that place or even can be seen within the chidakasha. Thus he says that we must idealise it all in the head itself. Also read verse 91.

Additional Notes

How can one see everything in the head?

What Bhagwan refers to in this verse is what happens to those spiritually elevated human beings who have activated their third eye. The now popularly known third eye is what is referred to as the spiritual eye or inner eye. When activated it activates the psychic powers of a human being.  This power is known as ‘clairvoyance’. The word comes from the French word ‘clair’ meaning “clear” and ‘voyance’ meaning “vision”. With this power activated, one is able to see distant object, person, location, or physical event through this extrasensory perception. One becomes aware of the past, present and future and in known as the ‘trikaal darshi’. These are very high states of an elevated human being such as an Avadhoota, who knows everything because he sees everything in his Chidakasha. He does not have to be told about something or does not need to go to a physical location to known something about that place or does not even have to open his eyes to see something out of him for he sees even with his eyes closed, for he is watching the whole play through his inner eyes. This is why Bhagwan says that one must witness the whole drama of the play of consciousness in this heart space of Chidakasha.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 96

“Mukti is according to the nature of our Bhakti. If you try hard, you get good salary. If you try a little, you get a small salary.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that mukti (liberation) happens according to the nature of our bhakti (universal love). For more details on ‘bhakti’ please see verses 43, 44 & 63. The goal of liberation is to achieve universal love, that is without an ounce of differentiation as explained in verses 43, 44 & 63. So he says if you try a hard you get good salary; meaning if you try hard to achieve universal love, you get the rewards of liberation. He also says, if you try a little, you get a small salary; meaning if the realisation of universal love is not complete, the rewards of liberation also are little.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 97

“When we are little children, we do not know who our father is and who our mother is. When we grow up, we come to know our parentage. When a cock eats, it scratches everything towards it with its feet. Similarly, when a man’s intellect is developed, he becomes selfish. Everyday men die; everyday men are born; but rarely do they burn their selfishness. Selfishness completely disappears when the divisible becomes one with the indivisible. From rice various kinds of eatables such as ‘Ambada’ and ‘Halva’ are prepared. These preparations are not called rice.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that we, as a child, are not really aware of who is our father and who is our mother, but the parentage becomes known only as we grow up. Till then there is nothing about the ‘me and mine’ because till then every act of the child is selfless. Once it starts becoming more aware of the world, it starts feeling  selfish, now identifying everything with itself, like “my” father, “my” mother, “my” body, “my” clothes, “my” toys, etc. Bhagwan gives the example of how a cock eats by selfishly gathering everything towards it with its feet. Similarly, when a man’s intellect is developed, he starts becoming selfish. He says everyday people are born and everyday they die, but rarely do anyone burn their selfishness. Bhagwan points out that the root cause of selfishness is duality, because only with duality comes divisibility. Duality creates divisions in the mind and thus comes the feeling of separatedness – the “me and he” – the “I and you” – the “we and they” – the “yours and mine”.  So Bhagwan says that selfishness completely disappears when when the divisible becomes one with the indivisible, when duality becomes nonduality. He says from rice so many dishes are prepared and each dish no more becomes known as rice, even though they are made up of rice, but they are known now as ‘ambada’, ‘halva’. This is precisely how man becomes divisibly known by his race, gender, caste, religion, colour, community, lineage, etc, even though the truth is that he is a pure divine soul, indivisible from the rest.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 98

A vessel without water is of no use. Bhakti is water; intelligence (buddhi) is the vessel. He who has no subtle Bhakti is no man. It is not the work of Shakti when a man dances an oracular dance; this dance is a trick. Trickery’s course is downwards. Shakti follows a middle course. Trickery belongs to the body; Shakti is Atmaic; trickery is powerless before the fire of Shakti.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a vessel without water is useless. Here, he compares the vessel to the buddhi (intelligence or awareness) and water to bhakti (subtle devotion). He says that he who has no subtlety of the devotion in his heart is no man. He says that when a man dances an oracular (ritualistic) dance, he may make it seem like he is dancing through the influence of some cosmic power, but Bhagwan says, this is not the wok of Shakti and this kind of a dance is only a trick or a foul play. He says the energy of such trickery is a downward flow whereas the flow of Shakti follows a middle course. Thus, all trickery (fraud/deception) belongs to the body only but activities of Shakti are atmaic (related to soul). Trickery is powerless before the fire of Shakti.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 99

“Almost all fruits have their seed inside; but cashew apple has its seed outside. Our mind like the seed of cashew apple, must be outside “Samsara”. One must not reserve sugar for himself and distribute sand to others. One following the royal road, should not lead others to the path covered with forests. It is one’s bound duty to lead others by the royal road. We must do this at once, we are not sure about the future.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that almost all fruits have their seed within the fruit but the cashew-nut fruit has its seed outside. He compares the cashew-nut seed to the mind and the cashew-nut fruit to ‘samsara’. Meaning, like the seed, the mind must remain outside samsara, untouched by the world and its activities. He says one must stay away from the humanly tendency of selfishness, like reserving sugar for oneself while distributing sand for the world. The one who is following the royal path (true spiritual path) should not lead others to the path covered by forests, rather it must be one’s bound duty to lead others also to the royal road. Bhagwan ends this verse by exclaiming urgency of the matter, stating that this behaviour/attitude is something that must be brought to effect immediately, as noone is sure if the future will serve such opportunities.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 100

When a train leaves a station, the next station is alerted that a train is approaching by the sound of bells ringing. What is called ‘Bindu-Nada’ is the bell. Just as we hear a sound when we throw a stone into a well, we hear “Bindu-Nada” inside the head.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when a train leaves a station, the next station is alerted that a train is approaching by the sound of bells ringing. This was the system followed during the steam-engine days. Bhagwan compares the ringing of the bell to the ‘bindu nada’.  He is referring the train to the Kundalini shakti and stations are the chakras. He says that the sound of the ‘bindu nada’ is heard in the head and is similar to the sound produced by a stone when thrown into a well. (For details on ‘bindu nada’ please refer to verses 3, 22 & 59)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 101

When a boy has passed the first standard and he goes to the second standard, books of the first standard are no longer required by him. When a man is in sound sleep, he sees neither the stars nor the sun nor the moon. He is aware of nothing. Then the mind is nil. Sleep is a subtle condition; it is not gross. In sound sleep we are not conscious of the body. Then we are conscious of Atma alone. We will have sleep when Prana is in a fixed plane in the body. When the ego is completely destroyed, everything seems to be like ‘reflection’. The mind’s delusion is not permanent. It is not Shiva.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan mentions of an example of how a body who has passed the first standard and entered the second standard, now no longer needs the books of the first standard. He is referring to the states  human consciousness which when transcends higher than the body consciousness is no more in need of things related to body consciousness. He says a man who is in sound sleep does not see the sun, moon and stars because his mind is absent and thus he is not even aware of them. He states that the sleep is a subtle condition and thus one is not conscious of the gross conditions of the gross body, but it is conscious only of the Atman (soul). Once can only enter into the sleep mode when settles down in a fixed state in the body. Movement of prana is alertness. Likewise, when the ego is completely destroyed, everything only seems like a mirage or reflection, because the it is the ego that otherwise gives grossness to the illusions of the world. Thus he says that the mind’s delusion is not permanent, it is not Shiva. The delusion will exist only as long as the ego exists.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 102

When a man has become a graduate-in-law, he receives a university gown. This gown covers the body from head to foot. It has four hands (two hands and two legs). When SAT and CHIT become united, we have Ananda, Brahmananda, Paramananda, Sri Satchidananda, Sri Yogananda. When we discard worldly pleasures, we enjoy divine pleasures, when we realize the truth about Jeeva, we enjoy Ananda.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when a man becomes a graduate-in-law, he receives a university gown that covers his body from head to foot. The gown has four extremity outlets (for two hands and two legs). Similarly, when the SAT and CHIT merge, the states of Ananda, Brahmananda, Paramananda, Sri Satchidananda, Sri Yogananda burst forth (read verses 53 & 89). He states that it is when the worldly pleasures are discarded that it is possible to enjoy the divine pleasures. The gown of self-realisation is earned only after one has graduated from the worldly desires. Man graduates when he realises the truth about the jeeva (read verse 7, 8, 9, 53, 57, 60) and that is when he experiences ananda (supreme bliss).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 103

Those who have no guru, have not realized the truth. In this world there is no effect without cause. When the darkness in this world has appeared as light that is called jnana. Darkness is ignorance. Light is knowledge. Do not be a hypocrite and earn fame.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who do not have a guru have not realised the ultimate truth. In this world there is no effect without a cause (for full details on ’cause and effect’ read verse 26 & 31). Light can only happen when there is darkness, where darkness is the cause of light. Darkness is ignorance and light is the wisdom of truth. So whenever the darkness of ignorance in the world gets transmuted to the light with the wisdom of truth, it is called jnana (divine wisdom). He says one should not be a hypocrite and earn fame by posing to have the wisdom without a guru, and without having transmuted the darkness within himself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 104

Say what you do and do what you say.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that one must not do one thing and say another. One must practice what one preaches. What is inside must be outside and what is outside must be inside with total transparency. If the in and out do not match then there is no truth in it and the person is nothing more than a hypocrite (read previous verse 103). So he says, say what you do and do what you say.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 105

Before you die, leave the forest path and follow the royal road. When you are on your death-bed, you may suffer the agonies of hell, your Prana being obstructed by the three humors (Vatha, Pitha, and Kapha).

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that before one dies, one must leave the forest path (that of animalistic tendencies) and follow the royal road (spiritual path). He says when one is on the death-bed, it may be too late, because at that time the prana can get obstructed by the three humors of Vata, Pita and Kalpha and thus suffering the agonies of hell during that moment. He stresses that it is better to take the right path when one is ably fit to live life than waiting to do it at the time of death.

Additional Notes

Why is it late on the death bed?

It is a common belief that spirituality is for the old and one must enjoy life in the active years of life and reserve spiritual practices only for the old age, and some even feel they will do it when death approaches. This is practically impossible because the spiritual practices are something that needs a human’s attention on priority, firstly because that is the prime purpose why he/she took birth. Secondly, active days of life are when a person can strive to achieve master oneself from all the clutches of ignorance because the royal path is something that requires time, perseverance and constant strength and work, which may not really be possible when the body is failing in old age or is preparing for the death-bed.

It has been well documented and propagated by the scriptures that what the state of mind during the time of death is what would be the state of the soul after physical death. Lord Krisha says in the Bhagwad Gita, “Those who relinquish the body while remembering Me at the moment of death will come to Me. There is certainly no doubt about this. Whatever one remembers upon giving up the body at the time of death, one attains that state, being always absorbed in such contemplation.” Meaning, whatever is the state of thoughts, feelings and emotions of the person at the time of death, that will be the state of the soul after it leaves the body, thus suffering immensely in that condition or being unconsciously attracted to take up a body in any species that matches or fulfils that state of mind. For example, if one is deeply in state of anger and revenge at the time of death, it will continue suffering those states now without a body and thus making it all very amplified with the agony of not even having a physical body to express all that. Or it may simply manifest a body that will immediately fulfil its urge to fulfil the anger and revenge, which is more easier in a body of a scopion or a snake! Similarly, if one is dying with emotions of lust, it may be more attracted towards animals that live a life of lustful activities. If one is dying with emotions of possessiveness towards one’s material properties or familial attachments, he may be reborn as a dog in that house, obsessively guarding and protecting the family and property. If one is dying with the obsession with food, he may more move taken birth as a bird.

It is important to note that these are all not conscious decisions by the soul, because the soul is in deep state of ignorance, for it has forgotten who it really is and is identified more with the predominant vasanas and samsakaras that it lived with the whole life. (For details on vasanas and samskaras read verse 90). So, there are many factors that govern one’s taking the next body in this manner or it is even possible that the soul just wander about in deep agony carrying these emotions and not finding an outlet, hence deeply suffering the agonies of hell. This is the state called as the “preth yoni” or the ‘wandering spirits/ghosts.

That is precisely why Lord Krishna say, “For those yogis who always think of Me with exclusive devotion, I am easily attainable because of their constant absorption in Me.” Meaning, one cannot at the last moment switch on to such thoughts even if they wish to, because what will dominate at the time of death is what has always been predominant in the mind during the whole lifetime. Hence, Lord Krishna says that one must constantly practice throughout the lifetime in contemplating on the supreme so that at the time of death, it naturally comes to him. This is what Bhagwan refers to when he says that it may be too late o take the royal road at the time of death, because at that time the person may be suffering through the agonies of hell.

Why is the path not to be taken lightly?

As discussed in previous verses (87) what Saint Tulsidas thus in Ramacharitra Manas says, “Bade bhaag manushya tann paava, Sur durlabh sab granth nigaava.” Meaning, “It is by the virtue of great fortune that one has been blessed with a human birth, as all scriptures teach, how difficult it is even for the angels to incarnate as humans.”

We may feel just being spiritual is enough, but it is not really so. The main goal on the spiritual path is to train oneself on being rooted in the highest truth at all times in order to achieve that even beyond death. A story from Mahabharata will illustrate this fact.

There was in India a great king named Bharata. Following the injunctions of the Shastras, when he grew old he renounced the world, leaving his kingdom to be ruled by his son. He entered the Himalayan forest and there far from his palace, wealth and former enjoyments, he built himself a little hut on the banks of a river. He collected and prepared his own food. There he spent his days communing with God, who is the Spirit present in the forest, in the trees, in the river and in the soul of man.

One day while he was meditating on the riverbank a deer came to drink water. As the deer was drinking, a lion in search of prey roared a little distance off. So frightened became the deer that she made a big jump to clear the river. The deer was with young, and this extreme exertion and sudden fright made her give birth to a little fawn, and immediately after she fell dead. The little fawn fell in the water and was being carried off by the stream. The king, who had been roused from his meditation by the roar of the lion, saw what happened and in the kindness of his heart he rescued the fawn from what would have been certain death. He preserved its life. The fawn grew up and became very much attached to the king, who also felt great attachment for the deer.

The more the king became attached to the deer, the less he could concentrate his mind on God. He was always thinking of the well-being of the deer anxious that no mishap should overtake it. Some years passed and then the king’s end approached. When he was about to die, instead of turning towards God his mind was occupied with the deer. He felt great anxiety as to how it would be able to find food and how it would be protected from wild animals after he was gone. And with his mind burdened with these thoughts and giving one last look at his beloved deer, the king passed away. And as a result the king was born as a deer in his next birth. This story depicts that despite what practices you do, your last thoughts are what determines our next course  in soul journey.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 106

There are many people in this world to take care of those who have passed the I.C.S., but there is none to inquire about the path to divinity. No one can describe what the bliss of Mukti means and what it is. That religion which was taught by Shiva from the beginning of creation is one and one only.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who pass I.C.S (Indian Certificate of Secondary Education) are taken care of by the world (because it was among the highest education those days. But there  is actually noone to inquire about those on the spiritual eduction on the path to divinity. This is because it is impossible for anyone to describe what the bliss of mukti (liberation)  means and even what it is all about. Meaning there are countless teachers of the worldly education and countless teachers of the spiritual education but rare is the one who can lead you to liberation. He says that the religion taught by Shiva from the beginning of time is the one and only true one. Bhagwan refers to the inner wisdom of the shakti rising from ignorance (lower chakras) to light  (Sahasrar chakra) – the wisdom of the Kudalini in the royal path of Raj Yoga, which is elaborated throughout the Chidakasha Gita.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 107

Adversity given by Shiva is no adversity. Sorrow given by Shiva is no sorrow. It is your mental delusion. At the time of our birth on this earth, there is some difficulty. So also at the end. When man come out of their mother’s womb, tears trickle down their eyes.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the difficulties or challenging situations given by Shiva is no adversity at all. The sorrow given by shiva is no sorrow but all difficulties are all your mental delusion. He says even at the time of birth on this earth, there is difficulty and so also in the end at the time of death. When a child is born, both the mother and the child have tears.

Additional Notes

Why are there adversities in human life?

Bhagwan is conveying in this verse that there is nothing called easy life when one chooses to reincarnate on earth. This is because this earth plane is a school which allows souls to be liberated from the bondage of karma, for which each soul will have to individually work it out. The earth is a place where every soul can create and manifest for itself through the gift of freewill, which no gods have the power to interfere with; such are the rules of earth plane. Every soul exercise their freewill and make choices that puts them into the cause and effect cycle, which is known as karma. (for a full detailed insight into ’cause and effect’ please refer to verse 31). It is only the power of discrimination using the buddhi (intellect) that man is selective in his choices, for what he sows he reaps. The whole Chidakasha Gita is talking about working on the buddhi and sharpening it so that one can go beyond the mind. Everything first takes place in the mind and then man creates. It is the mind where one creates and also where one experiences. Nothing really is happening outside. This is why Bhagwan in this verse says that it is a mental delusion to feel sorrowful for the adversities  given by Shiva. When we say God gives us challenges, this can be considered true, because life is designed in such a way that God cannot interfere into human freewill. When man deviates from the true purpose of liberating himself from the clutches of karma and falls more deeper into its clutches, adversities are the result of it. It is only with adversities that man can learn life lessons and realise his higher purpose and thus make conscious choices to rightful living and thus move towards God-realisation. Thus all the sufferings, firstly are created by man himself, and secondly they do nothing but help man retrace his journey back to God realisation.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 108

All is Shiva. Justice and its opposite both are Shiva. O Mind! Leave off injustice and be one with justice.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that both justice and injustice (right and wrong) is all Shiva. Everything has emerged from that Oneness – the Shiva consciousness, which people refer to to as God, with different names and forms. From this Shiva consciousness was born even duality in which the play of consciousness takes place. Thus, all is Shiva. Both side of the duality is Shiva – justice and injustice. But it is the mind that is delusional about it all and thinks about justice and injustice. Thus, Bhagwan says, “O Mind! Leave off injustice and be one with justice.” This can be seen from two angles – when the mind remains focussed on external injustice and internal injustice. The ‘external injustice’ is when the  mind remains focussed on the wrongs or faults of others, which prompts criticism, judgment and complaints in us. Here the mind can be directed to ignore the faults (injustice)  in others and see the good (justice) in them. When it comes to ‘internal injustice’ it can be the mind dwelling on one’s own wrongs resulting in guilt, self-pity,  victimhood, etc. Instead, the mind can be directed to learn through one’s mistakes and see what justice (right thing) can be done from our end.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 109

OMKAR is one without a second. Omkar is the cause of both creation and dissolution. Omkar destroys Manas. Omkar is really the Atman in you. Omkar is indivisible; a divisible object can never be indivisible. From the beginning there is only one religion taught by Shiva. If you sit in a room closing the doors, you do not see anything outside. When the doors are closed, Jeeva communes with Shiva. When the doors are not closed, Jeeva is separated from Shiva.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Omkar is primordial, meaning that which exists from the beginning of time, actually meaning no beginning and no end. That is why “OM” is known as the pranava mantra (primordial sound). It is from the OMKAR that everything was created. All sounds need the striking of two objects to be created but the sound of OM is the sound that is created on its own, which is why Bhagwan says Omkar is one without a second. It is the cause of both creation and dissolution. Omkar creates the mind and Omkar destroys mind. Omkar is the Atman (soul) in you or in other words you are Omkar. Omkar is one and not divisible. A divisible object cannot be indivisible, meaning anything else that is a thing that can be separated cannot come under ‘inseparable’.  He says from the beginning of time there has been only one religion taught by Shiva, which is the only one universal religion, without a name. He says if you sit in a room closing the doors, you do not see anything outside and when the doors are closed only the Jeeva (individual soul) communes with Shiva. When the doors are not closed, the Jeeva remains separated from Shiva. Closing doors and sitting in the room means closing all the external senses and withdrawing within. That is when the soul is truly able to unite and commune with Shiva. If the external senses are not closed, the soul will remain separated from Shiva dwelling within, because of the external distractions and mind being entertained by the play of duality outside.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 110

Omkar is indivisible. Omkar is creation. Omkar is maya, action, manas, consciousness, light of consciousness. Chitta is the cause of desire.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Omkar is indivisible as it is the primordial sound (see previous verse 109). Omkar is creation, Omkar is maya (illusion), Omkar is manas (mind), Omkar is consciousness, Omkar is light of consciousness. This emphasises on how the entire creation is from Omkar. He then says Chitta (mind without memory) is the cause of desire. (See more on Chitta in verse 53 & 86)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 111

SAT is the one, indivisible. It is the one “subtle” which is everlasting. CHITTA is always changing.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Sat is One and indivisible. Sat means “eternal truth” and there is only One eternal subtle truth, which infinite and everlasting and thus cannot be divided.  But, he says, Chitta is always changing. Chitta means the mind (the mind without memory).  For more deeper insights into the Sat & Chitta please refer to verses 53, 77, & 102).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 112

When the ‘SAT’ unites with ‘CHIT’, the resultant is Ananda. This Ananda is the Satchidananda, Sri Nithyananda, Sri Paramananda. Union of Jeeva and Paramatma is Ananda, Yogananda, Paramananda, Satchidananda and Brahmananda.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when Sat unites with Chit, Ananda is the result. Sat means “eternal truth” which is referred to the eternal infinite being, the eternal immortal being. Chitta means mind (the mind without memory). Ananda means eternal bliss. So Bhagwan is saying that when when eternal truth or the infinite being unites with your awareness or your consciousness, the result is eternal bliss (ananda).  In other words, when your awareness becomes fully conscious or aware of the eternal being (that you may call god or supreme or infinite) , both have merged, which results in the state of eternal bliss. Bhagwan says this eternal bliss is Satchidananda. Satchitananda is the state of eternal conscious bliss. He says this eternal bliss is Sri Nithyananda. Nithya means eternal and ananda is bliss. He says this eternal bliss is Sri Paramananda. Param means highest or supreme, so paramananda highest bliss.  Bhagwan says that the union of Jeeva (individual consciousness) and Paramatma (Supreme consciousness) is what he defines as Ananda, Yogananda, Paramananda, Satchidananda, Brahmananda.  These states are experienced in the head. (see verse 2, 40, 41 where Bhagwan talks about the ‘head’). In the head is the Brahma Nadi. Brahma Nadi is nothing but the  Sushumna Nadi (see more details on Sushumna Nadi in verse 2) This main Brahma Nadi is referred to as the Brahma (Creator). Brahmananda (supreme bliss) is Parmananda  (highest bliss). Bhagwan says Jeeva (individual soul) enjoys this bliss when he is united with the Parmatman (god or supreme). He says this bliss is also called Shivananda (shiva means supreme). Bhagwan then says this state is eternal joy and this is the liberated state.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 113

You must see that God who is in the heart space. Yes, you must see Him. You must see that Krishna who is eternal bliss (Nithyananda). It is delusion to regard stone as God. Pain of death given by Shiva is no pain. All sorrow is mental delusion. Praise God within yourself. Praise Him in your head! You must know the secret of Para Brahma who is eternal joy. Yes, you must know that secret. Look for Him in the heart. See Him with your inner eye; not with the outer. See the royal road with the internal eye. Leave the downward path and come to the central path. The downward path is that followed by those people who decorate the external body, without knowing the secret of God.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that you must learn to see the God that is within, in that heart space. He is referring to that Parmatman (god consciousness) present in every heart. He is not referring to the dual nature of god that we hold in our hearts as a separate entity, and so he says that you must see that Krishna who is in the heart space in the form of Nithyananda, the eternal bliss. He says it is delusional to regard the stone idol as god but rather to experience the tatva (element) of god.

He says that the pain or trauma of death that is given by Shiva is no pain. Brahma is the creator (birth), Vishnu is the preserver (life) and Shiva is the destroyer (death). This is why he is referring to as “death given by Shiva”. So, he says this death is the very process of the cosmos and that should not be considered as pain, because all such sorrow is only mental delusions, he says. Rather, praise god, he says… praise him in your head, the space of Chidakasha, the space of Para Brahma, who is eternal joy. He says that you must know this secret. (For deeper insights into what secret Bhagwan is referring to in this space of Para Brahma in the head, refer to verses 3, 41, 53, & 59). He asks that one must look for god in the heart with the inner eye and not the physical eyes. He says see the internal royal path with the internal eye. He asks one to leave the lower path and come to the central path because the lower path is followed by those who are simply only decorating their bodies without knowing this secret of god. Bhagwan calls the path of hypocrisy as the lower path and he calls the central path as the middle path or the royal path. Hypocrisy of only having put on external garb or holy beads or ash but not really having realised the self or experienced the nondual god within. (He has spoken of this also in other verses like 37 & 78)

Additional Notes

What is meant by lower path and middle path?

Central or middle path means “neutral” path. This central path is what Bhagwan calls throughout the Chidakasha Gita as the Royal Path.  It will have neither extremes – too much or too less, but will be of moderation. Like, the Royal Path is not be the path of extreme fasting nor the path of overindulging in food but will be in moderation of food intake. It is not the path of complete renunciation of the world nor the path of full indulgence in the word, but follows the balance of both worlds – spiritual and worldly. It is not the path of reaction, nor the path of suppression, but the neutral path of witnesshood. This neutral is what he is referring to as central path, or middle path or the royal path. (For more details on the ‘royal path’ please refer to verses 27, 33, 85, 99 & 105). Bhagwan insists that one must move from the lower path to the central path to be able to experience god in the nondual state.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 114

No one is mad in this world.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that noone is mad or noone is intelligent, but everyone is just the same. When the soul separated from the Supreme consciousness it was all the same pure spark of consciousness and only down the trail of soul journey the soul undergoes through various karmic influences and later gets termed by humans as mad or intelligent, good or bad. Eventually, sooner or later, every soul will return to its original state; no noone is really mad in this world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 115

Leave the gross pleasures and enjoy the subtle pleasures. Leave off the physical sleep and enjoy the subtle sleep. Enjoy that sleep which is eternal. This sleep is enjoyed only in our subtle state. Burn to ashes the delusion of the mind.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan asks to leave enjoying all the gross pleasures and rather enjoy the subtle pleasures. Gross pleasures are those that are enjoyed by the five senses – touch, smell, taste, sight, hearing. Touch is the pleasure derived from physical/sexual, comforts, etc. Smell is the pleasure derived from fragrances, perfumes, lust, etc. Taste is the pleasures derived from food and sex. Sight is the pleasure derived from seeing good/bad sights, images, movies, etc. Hearing is pleasure derived from listening to good/bad talks, music, etc. Bhagwan asks to move from these gross pleasures to subtle pleasures. Subtle pleasures are those pleasures derived without any physical involvement and is derived from within, like happiness, peace, bliss. (For more in-depth understanding read verse 10, 41, 51, 53, & 54)

Likewise, he says that one must leave off physical sleep and begin enjoying subtle sleep. Physical sleep is the gross sleep that we sleep at night or for rest. This involves only grossly sleep, that is an unconscious sleep. Whereas, subtle sleep is conscious sleep and is known as Yog Nidra. The subtle sleep that a Yogi consciously enjoys is the state of Samadhi. (Read in depth on ‘Yog Nidra’ and ‘Samadhi’ in verses 10, 49, 50, & 59) He thus says that this sleep in enjoyed only in the subtle state. He lastly asks that all such delusions of the mind must be burnt to ashes. Shifting from the gross to subtle rapidly burns off all such delusions of the mind.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 116

He is a Brahmin who has performed the Upanayana ceremony. Establish what is called ‘Upadhi’ in you. Being desireless, look inwards in your heart. See with the eye of desirelessness. Discard distinctions. Burn to ashes the idea of ‘you’ and ‘I’. Yes, you burn it to ashes.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan defines the true meaning of Brahmin, as the one who has performed the Upayana ceremony or the thread ceremony in certain sects of the human population. This is more of symbolic representation of the actual process of becoming a Brahmin. Upayana means “upliftment” or a process of initiating someone into a higher state. Bhagwan thus says to establish what is called as ‘upadhi’ in you. Upadhi means bestowing a title or an honor or a status. Bhagwan is referring to achieving the status of desirelessness without even the slightest distinction of duality. For that he asks to look within the heart being completely desireless and see everything with the eye of desirelessness. When there is absolutely no desire of any kind, the heart sees everything without any distinction, without any discrimination, it sees everything as one. There remains no distinction even between the seer and the seen – complete nonduality (advaita). Thus he says, burn to ashes of ‘you’ and ‘I’ and then he reiterates “Yes, you must burn it to ashes!” This is the state of Brahmin – this is the true process of Upayana.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 117

“In the beginning, there was only one religion propagated by Shiva. In the beginning, there was no difference like ‘man’ and ‘woman’ among among human beings. This distinction was only in the gross nature. In the subtle nature, all was one. The subtle has no qualities. The subtle receives only the eternal Ananda everywhere. Having and seeing is all mental delusion. The visible world is transient.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that in the beginning there was only one religion propagated by Shiva. The religion of Oneness, the religion of nonduality (advaita). There was no distinction of any kind – not even distinction between man and woman among the human beings, as everything was subtle in nature, where there cannot be any separateness. The distinctions happen only in the gross (dual) but in subtle nature everything is one (nondual). This is because the subtle has no qualities, explains Bhagwan. Because it has no other distinct quality other than its eternal one unique quality of eternal bliss (Nithyananda), the subtle receives only this eternal bliss everywhere. The distinct qualities of ‘having’ and ‘seeing’ are all only mental delusions, the unreal projections of the mind. Thus he says the visible world of this projection is a transient world, an imaginary world, a temporary world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 118

Hari is no Lord; Shiva is the Lord. What is called Hari is delusion. We must not be fooled by the shadow (reflection). What is called “Maya” is delusion. To distinguish between the subtle and the gross is delusion. The delusion caused by the subtle and the gross are the same. The delusion caused by the gross is multitudinous. To say that ‘this’ is different from ‘that’ is itself delusion. This delusion is caused by the mind. Look into the heart and realize the delusion called ‘eternal joy’. See the eternal soul in the heart. Yes, see it. You must say what you experience. You must not speak from hearsay. Speak what you have experienced. What is hearsay is no reality. What is hearsay is no Anand (bliss). What has repeatedly come to your experience is Ananda (true bliss).

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Hari is not the Lord but Shiva is the Lord. This is not about two Gods and who is more powerful than the other, but about the two deeper aspects of Hari (Vishnu) and Shiva. It is very important to understand this if the deeper insights of Bhagwan’s words have to be understood. This combined form of Shiva and Vishnu is known as HariHara (Hari is Vishnu and Hara is Shiva). Shiva (Hara) is the Supreme Consciousness. This is why Vishnu (Hari) is referred to as prakriti (nature) and Shiva (Hara) is referred to as the Purusha.

From Purusha evolves Prakriti. This is why Vishnu is known as the preserver or sustainer of life. The whole of nature or the cosmos is Prakriti. The whole Prakriti emerges from the consciousness (Shiva). If there is no consciousness (Shiva/Purusha) in nature (Vishnu/Prakriti) life becomes inert or lifeless.

Prakriti thus refers to the basic cosmic material which is the root of all beings, and Purusha refers to the spirit or conscious energy which governs life. The cosmic entity, (Shiva/Purusha), exists beyond the realms of time and space and combines with Prakriti (Vishnu) to form this world of creation. Both these eternal indestructible realities of Prakriti (Hari) and Purusha (Hara) combine to form the matter we perceive. Prakriti further evolves in response to Purusha, leading to the formation of the Pancha Mahabhootas or the Five Great Elements, namely, Akasha (Ether or Space), Vayu (Air), Agni (Fire), Jala (Water) and Prithvi (Earth).

So in other words, from the consciousness (Shiva/Purusha) has manifested the whole of creation (Vishnu/Prakriti). Creation (Vishnu/Prakriti) means form whereas Consciousness (Shiva/Purusha) is formless. Creation (Vishnu/Prakriti) is duality and Consciousness (Shiva/Purusha) is nonduality. Shiva is the nondual consciousness that exists in the dual (Vishnu) maya.  Out of nonduality (Shiva) is created the maya of duality (Vishnu).

“One must know Maya as Prakriti and the Master of Maya as the great Lord of all.” ~ Swetaswatara Upanishad. (IV. 10.)

Hence,  Bhagwan says that Hari is not the Lord but Shiva is the Lord. He says what is called Hari is delusion (maya) and that we must not be fooled by the shadow (reflection). Then he says that what is called maya is delusion and so to distinguish between the subtle (Shiva) and gross (Vishnu) is delusion. This delusion caused by the gross and subtle are thus nothing but the same, only that the delusion caused by the gross is just more multitudinous (seems more in quantity because of its dual nature). So, to even say that ‘this’ is different from ‘that’ itself is the biggest delusion, and this delusion is caused by the mind. Bhagwan says to destroy this delusion of the mind it is needed to look into the heart and experience the ‘eternal joy’. It is this heart space where the eternal soul can be experienced and only from this deep experience must one say what is experienced. One must not speak just from hearing things from here and there, but speak only from what you have personally experienced. He says what is said from hearsay is not from the bliss at all but what has repeatedly become your experience is the true bliss, and thus what is said from that space is the truth.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 119

Realize your Self. When you see another and yourself as different, it is delusion. Identify yourself with another. Realize the secret which is in yourself. It is not enough if you talk of this identity but you must act according to it. What you see with the external eye is of no use. The feeling of distinction will be the cause of trouble at the time of death.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that you must realise your self, meaning attain self-realisation. Until then you will be in the delusion of seeing yourself and others as different. He asks that one must identify with another and realise this secret which is within yourself. He says it is not enough to just talk of this identity but you must according to it. We normally have the knowledge that all is one or that there is no difference between us, but this Oneness and talks of nonduality is not just to be talked about but but one also act according to what one knows/speaks. He says what you see with the external eyes is of no use because physical eyes will only project duality and give you the sense of separateness. He says that this feeling of distinction will be the cause of trouble at the time of death.

Additional Notes

Why will the sense of distinction (duality) be the cause of trouble at time of death?

Bhagwan emphasises throughout the Chidakasha Gita the importance of leaving duality and striving for nonduality through which one experiences one’s Self and realises how there is absolutely no distinction between him and all life around. Experiencing oneness is the dissolution of the soul or the merging of the soul with the Ultimate and after that remains no duality. It is duality that separates a Jeevatman (soul) from Parmatman (God). Read verses 8 & 9.

If one remains unrealized of this, then at the time of death also the feeling of separatedness or duality will be the cause of suffering. There will always be a give and take when there is two. All karma is give and take. It is only to give and take that a soul takes birth and at the time of death also goes with a list of gives and takes, thus causing great distress at the time of leaving the body. All attachments, aversions, love, hate, greed, fear, pain, etc are caused from duality. Till there is duality, there will remain all these emotions. Thus a dying man will be still stuck in greed or attachment to that dual something and the great distress of losing it now. The distinction will also keep him separate from God and thus fear will grip him at the time of death, the fear of the unknown. For a realised one there is no other and for him there is no going anywhere, there is no other unknown realm and thus the process of death for him is never like what it is for the one who still has not realised the Self.

(To know about the deeper insights on liberation from the birth and death cycle, read verses 16, 31, 41, 42, 48, 51, 52, 55, 83, 89, 90, 105, 107, & 113).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 120

‘Same-sightedness’ is the ‘Oordhva Shwasa’ (upward breath) at the time of death. ‘Same-sightedness’ is the indivisible one. This is supreme bliss. This is the ‘subtle’. This is the ‘eternal’. In the ‘upward breath’, there is no cawing sound. O Shiva! By your grace, permit us to breathe in and breathe out harmoniously. One must meditate in the head. One must meditate upon the ocean of eternal bliss. Meditate in the Ida (lunar nerve), in the Pingala (star nerve) and in the Sushumna (solar nerve).

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that same-sightedness (equality) is the ‘oordhwa shwasa’ at the time of death. Oordhwa means upwards and shwasa means breath. Upward breath means the raising of prana to higher chakras and this is what must be done at the time of death, that the consciousness be raised, so that the soul leave though higher awareness, if not to liberation but atleast towards higher consciousness. But this first line of this verse makes it clear that to have an upward breath at the time of death it is important to have same-sightedness in one’s awareness, meaning a nondual approach of equality and oneness in everything without the slightest distinction between any two. He continues saying ‘same-sightedness’ is the indivisible one, the ONE, which is subtle, which is bliss, which is eternal. More insights on this bliss can be found in verses 3, 10, 22, 29, 41, 51, 53, 54, 58, 59, 69, 102, 106, 112, 113, 115)

He then says that in oordhwa shwasa or the upward breath there is no ‘cawing’ sound. More on this in the in additional notes. 

Bhagwan mentions what the prayer of a seeker must be – “O Shiva, may your grace help us breath in and out harmoniously.” Meaning seeking that one’s breath be always harmonious, which is a great achievement for those on the path to liberation. This reverts all our attention to the importance of breath, which Bhagwan has mentioned in verses 10, 11, 20, 32, 33, 45, 50, 52, 56, 58, & 59. For that he again reveals that one must meditate in the head and one must meditate upon the ocean of eternal bliss. he again points out to meditate on the 3 major nadis – the Sushumna nadi, Pingala nadi & Ida nadi. (More on nadis in verses 2, 53, 56, 58 & 59).

Additional Notes

What does it mean that in the upward breath there is no ‘cawing’ sound?

What does it mean that in the upward breath there is no ‘cawing’ sound?
Bhagwan says that in oordhwa shwasa or the upward breath there is no ‘cawing’ sound. He is referring to the gasping breaths that normally a dying person takes at the time of leaving the body. The struggle is usually when a person is in fear and clinging on to the body strongly and does not want to leave. The prana is exiting but the individual is struggling to retain it and in this struggle is the gasp for breath, which Bhagwan is referring to as ‘cawing’, resembling the cawing of a crow. But when one is leaving in awareness there will be no struggle because the seeker is himself supporting oordhwa shwasa or upward breath and in this process the prana smoothly rises towards the higher chakras without struggle.
It is now even published by science the revelations that the breath of a dying person changes at the time of death. They find that patients during or before moments of death create a crackling sound or something like a gurgling or moaning sound, which science calls as “death rattle.” They reveal that is due to the dysfunction of the ability to swallow or clear mucus at such a stage, that the patient makes such sounds with the breath. Medical findings also claim that this can seem very distressing to a loved one but in reality the patient does not experience any physical pain and is only the body’s physiological response. It is amazing to find this line of Bhagwan stating “in the upward breath there is no ‘cawing’ sound” in which so much is revealed.

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THE MEGA-VERSE OF

Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 121

“Ananda Kundalini! Rise! The match is in the match box. Light is in the match. Rub the match and kindle the fire. Agyana is darkness; gyana is the light. Kundalini is the eternal bliss; yes, it is so. Eternal bliss is in the heart. Infinite light is Kundalini! Kundalini is the ‘Light of Brahma’. The sunlight is the subtle light. The solar nerve is the Sushumna – The lunar nerve is the Ida and the stellar nerve is the Pingala. The nerve of the third eye is the seat of gyana. In this nerve is gyana. In this nerve is sleep – Sushupthi. In sleep, there is no wakefulness. Enjoy this sleep. Harmonizing both Prana and Apana, enjoy the subtle sleep. Harmonizing the Prana and Apana, enjoy the eternal bliss. The seat of breath is the truth. It is the internal space (Chidakasha). In the eternal space is the tower of eternal bliss. This tower is the seat of eternal peace.

In the ‘unconscious sleep’, enjoy the ‘conscious sleep’ of bliss. This is not the sleep of beasts. Sleep the ‘sleep of man’. Enjoy that sleep which must be the aim and end of man. Sleep the sleep of the ‘spiritual eye’. When talking, when sitting, without any desires, without any thoughts, sleep this spiritual sleep. Fixing your attention on breath, sleep. Perform the natural ‘japa’ of the inward and the outward breath. Have mental (subtle) bhakti; yes, have it. Attain liberation from bondage. Have constant bhakti; never interrupted. Breathe up and down without any restraint. Drawing the breath upwards is Pooraka; stopping the breath is Kumbhaka. Kumbhaka is your ‘real seat’. Breathing out is Rechaka. While breathing in, it should be like drawing water from a well. Draw the breath up to the Brahmarandhra in the brain. By such a breathing, kindle the ‘fire of gyana’. Purify the nadis. Burn the three humors (Vatha, Pitha and Kapha) in this fire. What is called ‘discrimination’ is such a fire: it is the yoga-fire; it is the food digesting fire in the stomach. The discrimination is the solar light.

God pervades the universe in the form of subtle energy. Creation is caused by the doubts of the mind. Creation is purely a mental affection. When you have attained the ‘same-sightedness’, there will be no creation. The subtle state is common to both mobile and immobile beings. The difference is in the casual (Prakriti). Difference is delusion. Difference is in the body. Bodies are transient. Prakriti is evanescent. When you realize the subtle in the gross, that state is called ‘Moksha’. Mukti is the indivisible. Mukti is in the heart-space. In the heart space is Shiva-Linga. It is self-existence. This is also called the ‘Prince-Prana’. This is the ‘upward breath’. This is known in yoga as Prana. Prana is the ONE. Prana is the ONE in all. Prana is the existence. This is known only to those who have practiced yoga. Those who have not practiced yoga are not aware of this fact; they being bound by desires. So, cut asunder the bondage of desires and hence attain salvation. Realize the one Tatwa; i.e., Paramatman. Realize him by the ‘internal eye’. He is a man who has realized God by the ‘internal eye’. Such a man feels that the universe is in him and he is in the universe. Mind, engrossed in the world, is not steady. Shiva who dwells in the heart-space is the ONE, everlasting. Shiva is OMKAR. OMKAR is Pranava. When united with forms, it is Pranava. Omkar is the ‘unawareness’ of bodily existence.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan exclaims to the Kundalini Shakti, “Blissful Kundalini, rise! The match (discrimination) is in the matchbox (buddhi/intellect) and light is in the match (buddhi/intellect). Rub the match (discrimination) against the matchbox (buddhi/intellect) and kindle the fire (divine wisdom). Bhagwan has spoken about this also in verse 16. Agyana (ignorance) is darknes, gyana (wisdom) is light and Kundalini is eternal bliss (which is in the heart space). He says this Kundalini is the infinite light, the light of Brahma, the creator. The sunlight is the subtle light. The solar nerve is the Sushumna Nadi, the lunar nerve is the Ida Nadi and the stellar (star) nerve is the Pingala Nadi. Read in-depth insights about Nadis and their meeting in the ‘heart space’ in verses 2 & 3).

He then calls the third eye as the seat of wisdom, in which one experiences the sleep state of consciousness (sushupti). In this state there is no wakefulness and this is the subtle sleep (samadhi) that must be enjoyed. (To know in-depth insights about the 4 states of consciousness read verse 10). He reveals that when the two vayus, Prana Vayu and Apana Vayu are harmonised, this subtle sleep of eternal bliss can be enjoyed. He reveals that this seat of breath (Agya chakra/Third eye) is the eternal space of Chidakasha, which is the tower of eternal bliss (Nithyananda) and the tower of eternal peace. He says, in this space of ‘unconscious sleep’ one can enjoy the ‘conscious sleep’ of bliss. Unconscious because the state of sleep is experienced by an ignorant unconsciously where he remains unconscious during the sleep but an awakened person will be conscious and aware even during this sleep state, which he calls as ‘conscious sleep.’ So he further says that this ‘conscious sleep’ is not the sleep of beasts (ignorant) but the sleep of man (awakened). He says to enjoy this sleep must be the aim of every man and even the end of man, meaning one’s journey must end with this conscious eternal sleep. So he asks to sleep the sleep of the spiritual eye (third eye/agya chakra). He then says that even while talking, while sitting, without any desire or thought, one must sleep this spiritual sleep (be in the state of Yog or union with the divine). He says that one must remain in this sleep by inwardly fixing attention on the breath by performing the natural chant of inward and outward breath. At the same time he asks to maintain the uninterrupted internal bhakti (devotion) which will liberate one from bondage. He says the breath must be freely taken,  very naturally without any restraints. He explains that the process of drawing the breathing in is called Pooraka, the process of breathing out is called Rechaka and the process of holding of the breath is called Kumbhaka. He reveals that Kumbhaka is the “real seat”.  Deeper insights into this in additional notes.

He says that the breathing in should be like drawing water from a well and drawing it up to the Brahmarandhra in the brain, kindling the fire of wisdom. (For deeper insight into this method please refer to verse 6.) This process purifies the nadis by burning the three doshas of Vata, Pita & Kapha in this fire. (See verse 105). He says this the ‘yoga fire’ , the fire that digests food in the stomach, and calls this fire as ‘discrimination’, the solar light. He adds that this god pervades in the Universe as this subtle energy. The entire creation is caused by the doubts of the mind and is purely what he calls as mental affection. Discrimination begins from here. He adds that there is no creation when you have attained ‘same-sightedness’ (no discrimination). This subtle state of oneness is common between both mobile and immobile beings, in the moving and the inert. The difference appears in the casual (prakriti). Read verse 118. He thus says that such difference is only in the body and is delusional. Bodies are transient and prakruti (creation) is also temporary. He says that when you realise this truth of the subtle in the gross, that state is called ‘moksha’ or liberation. This mukti (liberation) is indivisible in the heart space. In this heart space is the Shivalinga, which is self-existent, which is also referred to as the ‘prince prana’. (See verse 69). This is the upward breath, known in Yoga as ‘prana’. This prana is ONE. It is ONE in all. Prana is existence. Bhagwan says that this is only known to those who have practiced Yoga (not physical) and those how have not practiced Yoga are not aware of this fact, as they are yet bound by desires. So he asks to cut asunder the bondage of desires and to attain salvation by realising the ONE tatva, that is, the Parmatman (Supreme), by realising by Him through the internal eye. He says that the one who has realised Him through the internal eye is truly a man. Such a man will experience that the Universe is within him and he is in the Universe. The mind that is engrossed in the world is not steady. Shiva who dwells in the heart space is the everlasting ONE. Shiva is omkar and omkar is pranava. When the omkar is united with forms it is the pranava (See verse 6 & 62).  Bhagwan finally ends this mega-verse by stating that omkar is the unawareness of bodily existence.

Additional Notes

The 2 main Vayus (Prana & Apana) of the 5 Pancha Vayus

There are 5 important breaths or Vayus or Pranas in humans:

  1. Prana  Vayu: This is the first and the main of the 5 pranas. It functions between the throat and the diaphragm. All organs of the thorax including heart (pumping blood) and lungs (respiration) are maintained by the Prana Vayu. 
  2. Apana Vayu: Is the second of the 5 Pranas and is responsible for elimination. It controls the organs that are between the naval and the perineum – like, small and large intestine, kidneys, urinary system and reproductive systems. Elimination of waste as feces, gas, urine, ejaculation in men and the monthly menstrual cycle and childbirth in women is maintained by the Apana Vayu.
  3. Samana Vayu: Operates between the naval and the diaphragm and is responsible for the function of organs like stomach, liver, pancreas, spleen, small and large intestine. The Samana Vayu travels sideways and responsible for digestion and assimilation of nutrients into the body.

  4. Udana Vayu: Functions above the throat, face and head region, and responsible for all the sensory organs and functioning of the brain. It also controls the organs of movement including hands and legs.

  5. Vyana Vayu: It pervades in the entire body, reaching the needed nutrients to every cell of the body via blood flow in the circulatory system to reach all the organs. Whenever there is a shortage of energy in any part of the body, it is the Vyana Vayu that immediately sends the required nutrients to the cells to produce the energy, acting like a dynamic reserve store of energy for the whole body. It also aids in muscular movements by carrying out the sensory and motor impulses from different parts of the body. It also is responsible for perspiration from the skin.

The Apana & Prana Vayus: Out of the 5, Bhagwan is referring to the two main pranas – the Prana Vayu and Apana Vayu. Subtly, the Prana Vayu flows from the third eye (Agna) to the tailbone (Mooladhara) supplying the cosmic life force energy downwards. This downward pull is what keeps one towards desires and manifestations out into the worldly, keeping man rooted in the gross and body consciousness through the senses. Subtly, the Apana Vayu flows from the tailbone (Mooladhara)  to the third eye (Agna). This upward pull is what keeps one moving higher and seeking liberation from worldly desires and bondages. When the seeker gains mastery in controlling both these Prana Vayus at the sear of the third eye, is when one enters the space of Chidakasha, the space of eternal bliss and eternal peace, where the “conscious sleep” of samadhi is enjoyed.

Why Bhagwan calls Kumbhaka as the “real seat”?

It is very important to note that Bhagwan is talking of the breathwork, he is not certainly talking of just the physical yoga of gross breath-work but he is referring more to the subtle breath-work. All school of yoga teaches and practices gross breath-work, which no doubt activates the subtle breath-work too but a seeker in “awareness” of this subtle breath of consciousness has known the secret of it all.

The mystery of breath has the secrets to the man’s longevity and immortality. The Yogis who have mastered the Kevala Kumbhaka can stop life and enter into eternity. This is certainly not the forceful stopping of the physical breath that can only cause damage but this is the mastery over the subtle breath where the breath becomes so subtle that it is hardly felt by the practitioner, to the state that the breath completely stops naturally and he enters into deep samadhi.

Here are some references from great scriptures:

  • “Liberation can be attained by that pranayama which is accomplished by disjoining the course of inspiration and expiration.” (Yoga Sutras II:49.) 
  • “When the breath stops effortlessly, without either rechaka (exhalation) or puraka (inhalation), that is called Kevala Kumbhaka.”—Hatha-Yoga Pradipika, 11:73.
  • “The aspirant who can perform Kevali Kumbhaka, he only is the true knower of Yoga.”—Gheranda Samhita, V:95.
  • “One who is adept in Kevala Kumbhaka, which has no rechaka and puraka, he has nothing unattainable in the three worlds.”—Siva Samhita 111:46-47.]
  • “The pranayama yoga practices breathing the opposite way until the currents are neutralized into pooraka equilibrium. Offering the exhaled breath into the inhaled breath is called rechaka. When both air currents are completely stopped, one is said to be in kumbhaka-yoga. By practice of kumbhaka-yoga. one can increase the duration of life for perfection in spiritual realization. The intelligent yogi is interested in attaining perfection in one life, without waiting for the next. For by practicing kumbhaka-yoga. the yoga increase the duration of life by many, many years.” – The Bhagwad Gita 4:29

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 122

OMKAR is the elite of all. Omkar is like the dawn of the sun. Omkar is the witness of all. Omkar is the most frightful of all forms. Omkar is fire. There is not a greater thing in this universe than fire. Fire is pervading both internally and externally. In the middle is the earth. The earth is below; air is above. Air pervades the universe; the universe is in air. The first is air; the second is fire. The first is discrimination; the second is sound. Soundlessness is in the form of air. Soundlessness is eternal bliss. It is existence, knowledge, bliss. The Self should be merged in soundlessness. The visible world is in the Self. When SAT unites with CHIT, Ananda is realized. This Ananada is Vivekananda, Chaitanyananda, Sri Brahmananda, Paramananda, Sri Nithyananda, and Satchidananda. What is manliness is the realization of this Ananda. This is Brahma Jnana, Yoga Jnana, Kala Jnana. This “Tri-Kala-Jnana” is in the heart. In the heart is Mukti. Nithyananda Mukti is in the heart.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan exclaims the splendour of the Omkar. Omkar is the sound from which the whole creation emanates and  is the superior of all and is like the dawn of the sun.  See more details on Omkar in verses 6, 80, 109, 110, 121. Bhagwan praises  Omkar as the elite (superior) of all, the dawn of the sun, with witness of all, and the most frightful of all forms. He calls Omkar as fire as there is nothing more greater than fire in this Universe, he adds. Fire pervades both internally and externally.

He says above earth element is the air element and the air pervades in the Universe or it can be said that the whole Universe is in the air (space). First came air out of which fire was born. (See deep insights explained on the 5 elements in great detail in verse 91). Air represents nonduality and absence of form or sound. This nondual state is state of perfect discrimination where all dualities and distinctions end. Duality and hence sound begins from fire. (From ether came air, from air came fire, from fire came water and from water came earth.) He says that the first is air, which is subtle discrimination. After that second is fire from where sounds begin (duality begins).

He says air is soundless, and this soundlessness, silence, eternal bliss, existence, knowledge, bliss. He says the Self should be merged in this silence. The visible world is already in the Self. When SAT unites with CHITTA, Ananda is realized and tThis Ananda is Vivekananda, Chaitanyananda, Sri Brahmananda, Paramananda, Sri Nithyananda, and Satchidananda. (This phrase has been mentioned twice earlier by him in verse 69 & 112). He says realising this eternal bliss is manliness because this is Brahma Jnana (Supreme wisdom), Yoga Jnana (wisdom of salvation), Kala Jnana (wisdom of time). This Tri-Kala-Jnana (wisdom of the past, present and future) is in the heart. In the heart (Chidakasha) is Mukti (liberation). Nithyananda Mukti (the bliss of salvation) is in the heart (Chidakasha).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 123

“Bhakti is prema (love). Giving to eat or eating is not Bhakti. It is the delusion of the mind. It is pertaining to the body. There should be ‘subtle’ eating and drinking. One should drink the water of discrimination. Peace is water. Yogananda is sitting on the water of peace. O Mind! Leave off worldly pleasures and enjoy eternal bliss! Oh Mind! Leave off worldly joy and enjoy eternal joy! Enter into the eternal, Oh Mind! Run into the heart; the real enjoyment is in the heart; enjoy that pleasure which is called Mukti. Live in it. Enter into the internal, leaving off the external. Oh Mind! Open the third eye. Do not be thinking of anything else. See the world with the ‘same-sightedness’.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse emphasises on opening the third eye and using one’s power of discrimination to destroy all dualities of the mind and see oneness everywhere. In this verse, one can see how powerful the mind is in creating delusions and trapping the soul into the illusion of samsara and keeping the soul in bondage for eons. He thus repeatedly commands repeatedly to the mind to give up this delusion.

He says true bhakti (devotion) is prema (love). Giving someone to eat or eating for the sake of another is not devotion but love is. (This could be in context to people offering Bhagwan food as a devotional gesture). He says this is all delusions of the mind as such devotion pertains only to the body. He says rather such eating should be not grossly but subtle. Meaning when offering someone food, more than the physical offering is the bhaav (intention/emotions) with which it is offered. It can be seen that when food is offered to ancestors, it is the emotions and intent that plays a role. The ancestors never eat physical food but it is the “subtle eating and drinking” that gives them contentment and thus the emotion/intention behind the act plays a more important role whenever such devotion to god, guru, diety, ancestor, etc are done out of pure love (prema). He says one should rather drink the water of ‘discrimination’ after which one is able to discriminate the real from the unreal. He says this water is peace and Yogananda is seated on this water of peace. Yogananda refers to the bliss one attains when in communion with the divine.

But for this to happen, the biggest obstacle – the mind, needs to be trained with the power of discrimination (buddhi/intellect). He then stresses on commanding the mind, “Oh mind, leave off worldly joy and enjoy eternal joy! Oh mind, enter into the eternal! Oh min, run into the heart (Chidakasha) because the real bliss is in the heart – enjoy that bliss which is called mukti (liberation). Leave the external and enter into that internal space and live in that sacred space. Oh mind, open the third eye and do not be thinking of anything else. Begin seeing the world with same-sightedness, as ONE.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 124

Japa cannot be performed by the finger-tips. Japa cannot be performed by the tongue. Shiva cannot be attained by Manas. Karma cannot be done with the hand. Karma cannot be done with legs. Oh Mind! Perform karma without attachment. Being desireless, see the world.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse states that the subtle cannot be achieved through the gross. He says japa (chanting) cannot be done by the fingertips, meaning by mere rotation of the rosary beads (mala) in the hand. He says japa cannot be even performed by the tongue, meaning by mere recitation of the mantra. He says Shiva cannot be attain by the mind, meaning just by thinking about the Supreme. He says karma cannot be done with the hands, meaning charity or service and nor can karma be done with legs, meaning by pilgrimage. He then reveals how is it that karma must be done and how the Supreme (Shiva) can be attained. He asks that the mind be reminded to perform karma without any attachment and to see the world through desirelessness. So he reveals DETACHMENT is the key as he says that the world must be looked at without any desire (detachment) and to perform every action without attachment (detachment).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 125

“Mean dispositions of the mind are senselessness. This senselessness is the pariah (outcaste). Joking and mocking at others, hypocrisy, pride and envy, etc. are the pariah characteristics. He whose skin is black, he whose clothes are black, is not a pariah. A man who has a turban on his head, a wristwatch on his wrist, is pariah if he does not recognize the ‘equality’ in all. One who is a pauper is not a pariah, but he who is selfish and is full of differences is a pariah. He is not a man who has not realized the truth of ‘Vedanta’. Liberation in one’s lifetime is that Vedanta which is like a trained horse. But the Vedanta which is like a wild elephant is not Mukti but delusion.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Not more can be emphasized on the repeated teaching of Bhagwan throughout the Chidakasha Gita on how much he is stressing every seeker to imbibe the spirit of Oneness, how much he is pointing one towards leaving all distinctions of dualities and attaining the nondual state and how much he is stressing to make this the goal of human life. In this verse he again reiterates that an outcaste (pariah) is not the downtrodden or inferior person but outcaste is the person who criticises, judges, and makes distinction of any kind between himself and the other. He says that such mean interests or mean inclinations are the mean dispositions of the deluded mind which is senselessness. This deluded mind of senselessness is the real pariah (outcaste). Joking on others or mocking others or holding hypocrisy, pride and envy are all the characteristics of such an outcaste. Not those whose skin is black or those who wear black are outcaste, but outcaste is the man who has a turban on his head (name/tittle/position/power/fame) and a wristwatch on his wrist (pompous) but does not  recognise the equality in all. He is pointing towards the superior complex that one may carry that he/she is greater or superior than others in any form. He says the one who is pauper or a beggar is not the outcaste but outcaste is he who is selfish and full of differences with others. Such is not a man who has realised the truth of the Vedas. The verse beautifully ends with Bhagwan stating that real mukti or liberation in one’s lifetime is this deep realization of the Vedanta, which is like a trained horse, very much on the right track on it’s course, but not like the wild elephant that feels it is strong and right and running amok in the false interpretation or no realisation of this truth of Vedanta.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 126

A selfish mind is not steady (firm). A subtle discrimination is steady. What is creation is peace. What is creation is ‘witnesshood’. What is creation is subtle discrimination. Subtle discrimination gives us health giving contentment. Subtle discrimination is the seed of Mukti. Trickery (Yukti) is not superior to Shakti. Trickery is subject to Shakti. Trickery is the delusion of the mind. Shakti is from Atman. Subtle discrimination is the real buddhi. Shakti truly so called is subtle discrimination.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a selfish mind is not steady or firm but a subtle discrimination is steady. Meaning the ability of the buddhi/intellect to discriminate between the real and unreal and steadily hold on to the real. There is only one reality or truth that the whole Chidakasha Gita speaks of when it comes to discrimination and that is to discern the truth of Oneness without an iota of dual distinction. When the mind that has realised this truth sees everything with the discrimination of a purified intellect/buddhi,  only oneness can be seen in creation and thus creation will only be peace, for any kind of distinction or duality is absent. The buddhi/intellect only becomes a witness to creation which is why Bhagwan says that all that is creation is ‘witnesshood’ and what is creation is subtle discrimination. He says subtle discrimination gives us health and contentment. This subtle discrimination, he says, is the seed of mukti (liberation). Whereas Yukti (intelligence/logic) is what he calls as trickery and thus Yukti is not superior to Shakti (discriminative power). Yukti is subjective to shakti or inferior to shakti. All intelligence and logic (Yukti) is trickery or delusion of the mind whereas Shakti (discriminative power) comes from the Atman (soul). So he says subtle discrimination is the real buddhi or real intelligence and that if shakti has to be truly defined, then subtle discrimination is the word.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 127

“What you see with the physical eye, is the gross intellect, what you see outside is the gross intellect. What you see inside is not Hari. What is visible is not Shiva. What you see inside is not the Universe. In Shiva is Hari; in Hari is not Shiva.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse speaks about duality and nonduality and how duality is within nonduality and not otherwise. the terms that he uses for duality in this verse are – physical eye, gross intellect, Hari, Universe. The only term that he uses for nonduality here is Shiva. As revealed by him in verse 118 that Shiva is the ONE, unborn, unending, nondual eternal Supreme consciousness out of which nature manifests into duality as Hari. There he already mentions that Hari (Prakriti) has come from Shiva (Purusha) and Shiva (nonduality) has not from Hari (duality). In this verse he continues in the same line stating that what you see with the two physical eyes in the external world is because of the gross intellect. Till now Bhagwan had always been saying intellect (buddhi) but in this verse he says ‘gross’ intellect. The intellect is what has the power to discriminate the real from the unreal. A sharpened intellect or buddhi (in awakened ones) can easily see illusion and temporariness of the illusory samsara and the reality of the true nature of the soul, whereas an unsharpened intellect (in unawakened ones) cannot differentiate between illusion and reality. This unsharpened intellect is what he calls as ‘gross’ intellect. So, he says what you see with the physical eyes is a product of the gross intellect. This gross intellect also cannot ascertain between Shiva and Hari and thus he says what you see inside is not Hari, because Hari is manifestation of the Universe that is seen and experienced by the physical eyes as nature. (prakriti). This nature is dualistic and hence can be seen by physical eyes through gross intellect but cannot be seen by the inner eyes, which is what means by ‘what you see inside is not Hari’. The inner eyes with the ‘subtle’ intellect can see/experience within only the consciousness (Shiva) and this Shiva cannot be seen in the dual world outside, which is why he says ‘what is visible is not Shiva.’ He also says thus that ‘what you see inside is not the Universe’ because the Universe (Hari) is outside that can be seen with the physical eyes. Since Hari (duality) manifests out of Shiva (nonduality), he says ‘in Shiva is Hari, in Hari is not Shiva’.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 128

The subtle intellect is Buddhi or Jnana. The internal concentration is one-pointed. The gross intellect is like a horse which is not controlled by reins. The intelligence which is acquired from others is not permanent. It is not Hari; it is not Shiva. That which is imparted by the guru is the subtle intelligence. It is never gross. The gross intelligence is bestial. He is not a man who does not return what he has received.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the subtle intellect is Buddhi or Jnana. and this comes from the internal concentration that is one-pointed. But the gross intellect (logic/reasoning/intelligence) is like a horse which is not controlled by reins. This is because gross intellect is the influenced by vasanas (tendencies) that are deeply embedded in the deep realms of the mind. Whereas the subtle intellect is spontaneous (like that in intuition or knowing) and this is not influenced by vasanas but works in sync with the divine forces because it is in divine union (yog) with the supreme consciousness. Thus Bhagwan says that the gross intellect is like a horse that is unable to be controlled by the reins. The intelligence that is from the subtle intellect is pure but the intelligence acquired from the gross is what which is acquired from outside, from others, and this gross intelligence is not permanent. It is neither Hari nor it is Shiva. The wisdom that is imparted by the Guru is subtle intelligence because a Guru is the one who is one with the Supreme and what flows through him comes from his subtle intellect and never the gross knowledge acquired from the world. Bhagwan says such gross intelligence is bestial. He calls it bestial because any such gross knowledge received from the world is motivated by selfish needs and hardly used for the benefit of the world. Anything that is sought, achieved and kept for oneself is animal tendency (pashu bhaav). Gross knowledge is collected only for selfish needs, but subtle wisdom from subtle intelligence is always distributed back to the world, like a Guru gives it back to the world selflessly. So Bhagwan says, such intelligence is bestial and the one who does not return what he has received (gross wisdom) is not a man but a beast. It also refers to what Bhagwan says in verse 143 about one purifying oneself and returning that purified state back to the Supreme, as it was given. It is beastly to remain with the acquired gross worldly intelligence without evolving to knowing the Self and attaining self-realisation through the inner subtle wisdom.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 129

He who is ignorant of the true goal of life is a beast. This goal is desirelessness. He who is ignorant of this fact is not a man. Man who is the crown and culmination of God’s creation, must not be like a frog which sinks below water and rises above water repeatedly. This human life is not a comparison to that of the frog. This life cannot always be attained. When we have acquired it, we should make efforts to reach the goal of life. Meals cannot be had before cooking. Discrimination is the fire; intelligence is the vessel; Mukti is the goal of life.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who is ignorant of the true goal of life is a beast. He reminds the true goal is desirelessness and that he who is ignorant of this fact is not a man. He says that man is supposed to be the crown and culmination of God’s creation and thus he must attain liberation from everything that keeps him away from becoming one with God. He says man must not be like a frog that keeps sinking below the water and rising above water repeatedly. Meaning, man should not be inconsistent with his efforts towards rising higher to his true goal and become like a frog that sometimes keeps rising above the water (desires) and sometimes sinking into water. Thus, he says that this human life is not a comparison to that of the frog. He reminds that human life cannot always be attained always and it is a great blessing to have human life. (Read verse 51 & 89) So, he says, when one has acquired it, then all efforts should be made to reach the true goal of life. He says, meals cannot be had before cooking. Discrimination is the fire; intelligence is the vessel. Meaning, the intelligence or contents of the mind must be cooked with the fire of discrimination of the subtle intelligence (buddhi). The result is cooked food (Mukti/liberation) and he says Mukti must be the goal of life.”

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 130

One is the dwelling; one is the eternal dwelling (state of liberation); that dwelling is OMKAR. That dwelling is formless; changeless; indivisible. Future is not happy; today is the happy day. Tomorrow is not; day after is not. Nine o’clock, ten o’clock is not the time. Now is the time. The indivisible time you realize by discrimination is ‘the time’. The time that you spend forgetting the goal of life is beggarly.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In this verse, Bhagwan talks of what is Mukti or liberation. He says there are two types of dwelling places. One is the dwelling place we live in, that is, our home or planet, which is the limited place of dwelling. The other dwelling place is eternal, which is Omkar, the state of which is achieved through mukti/liberation. This eternal dwelling is formless; changeless; indivisible. (Read deeper insights on Omkar in verses 6, 80, 109, 110, 121 & 122). Bhagwan then reveals that this state of liberation is in the NOW moment, as it is only the present moment that is real and the past and future are illusions that do no exist. He says future is not happy but today is the happy day. Neither tomorrow is the happy day nor the day after is. Neither is 9 o’clock or 10 o’clock the real time, but the real time is in the “NOW”. He says that this indivisible, eternal, NOW moment is by discrimination (buddhi/intellect) and this NOW is “the time” that connects you with your true goal of human life (liberation). He concludes that the rest of all the time that you spend forgetting the goal of life is beggarly.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 131

The seat of Mukti is ‘Gokul Nandan’. ‘Govardhana’, ‘Gokul’. The third eye is the ‘Gokul’. The internal eye is ‘Gokul’. It is Mathura; it is Vrindavana.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan reveals that the seat of liberation (Mukti) is what is referred to as Gokul Nandan. The word Gokul Nandan means “The beloved of Gokul” and is referred to Krishna. Bhagwan reveals nondualistically that Krishna is the liberated state of consciousness and his seat is in the third eye. So he points the terms Gokul Nandan, Govardhan, Gokul to be the seat of liberation, which is the third eye. So, he concludes that the internal eye (third eye) is Gokul, is Mathura, is Vrindavana. He is clearly referring to achieving the liberated state of Krishna Consciousness by raising one’s consciousness to the third eye and being established there in the liberated state (Mukti). Read more on the third eye in verses 12, 22, 91, 95, 121 & 123). 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 132

Look for the all-pervading God in the head! Truly look at Him in the head! Hence enjoy the eternal bliss! See this creation in the heart.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In the previous verse, Bhagwan had revealed that Krishna must be sought internally (nondualistically) than externally, by visiting the true seat of liberation – the third eye, which is the true Gokul, Vrindavan and Mathura.asks. In this verse, he continues to say that one must look for the all-pervading God in the head! Truly that one must look in the head! Here one will enjoy the eternal bliss. He asks to see this creation in the heart space or Chidakasha. (Read deeper insights about the heart space or Chidakasha in verses 3, 72, 94, 95, 113 & 121)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 133

Realization of OMKAR is the annihilation of the world. Realization of OMKAR is the destruction of the Manas. When honor and dishonor have become one to a man, he attains Ananda, eternal joy, exhaustless joy, real joy. Then all that appears, becomes nothing but joy.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan reveals that the realisation of Omkar is the annihilation of the world and the destruction of the mind. It has been at various times spoken by Bhagwan in the Chidakasha Gita how one’s goal of life must be to annihilate the mind because all duality, all maya, all creations appear only when the mind is present. All dualities like praise/criticism, honor/dishonor are active only when the mind is active. When the mind ceases to exist (like in the great Avadhootas) all duality collapses and all maya and illusions vanish and all that remains is the state of Nithyananda (eternal bliss). This state is the realisation of the Omkar. So Bhagwan says that when honor and dishonor (dualities) become one (nonduality) he attains the exhaustless real eternal bliss and then all that appears is nothing but only that blissful joy. This is Mukti/liberation.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 134

‘Shiva is from Kasi’; the heart space is Kasi; manas is Kasi. Everything is Kasi. The eternal Atman is Kasi. What is Kasi is in the head. The 10 Nadas (sound) are eternal. The subtle Kasi is the Nirvikalpa Kasi. What is Haridwar is the 9 gates in the body. It is the heart space. It is the place of peace. Yajna (sacrifice) is the immortal Jnana (wisdom).

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

When Bhagwan says that ‘Shiva is from Kasi’ he is certainly not meaning a god or an individual or a being who hails from Kasi. He is referring to the Siva, the supreme consciousness. He is referring to the hub of the creator as the heart space which represents Kasi. He then says that the mind is Kasi and everything is Kasi. The eternal Atman (Supreme) is Kasi and that this Kasi is actually situated in the head. Read additional notes for more clarity. Bhagwan speaks again of the 10 Nadas (divine sounds) that are heard within and are eternal. (read verse 3, 59, 62 & 100) He refers to it as ‘subtle’ Kasi and as the Nirvikalpa Kasi. (For more on the state of ‘nirvikalpa’ read verse 3, 10 & 49). He then states that similarly the ‘subtle’ Haridwar in the heart space represents the 9 gates in the body, which is the place of peace. (For deeper insights into the 9 gates, refer to verse 9). Realising this ultimate truth by attaining the immortal wisdom of Shiva consciousness in the sacred heart space is the true Yajna (holy ritual sacrifice of offering to sacred fire).

Additional Notes

If Kasi is inside the head, what is Kasi situated in North India?

It is important to note that everything in the Universe exists both externally and internally. What is external is the macrocosm, which is the representation of the internal microcosm. (See verse 11). Macrocosm is the form (duality) which takes its form from the formless micocosm (nonduality).  What is external is the place is Kasi (Varanasi) situated geographically in North India, which is the gross manifestation of duality. But Bhagwan throughout the Chidakasha Gita has been speaking only of everything in the nondual. Here also he is stressing one to give more importance to the subtle nondual realities. Bhagwan reveals that the subtle reality is that this sacred Kasi is actually situated within our heart space. Dualistically, the most popular practice is the pilgrimage of Kasi, Haridwar and many such holy places, which have deep subtle relevance within our sacred spaces of consciousness too. Bhagwan stresses more on dwelling in these than out.

It is a well-known belief that those who die in Kashi, Hardiwar, etc attain salvation, hence most of the people, especially in their last days in old age, strive to spend their last days in these holy places. However, the actual truth is that one must dwell in one own inner hearts space (inner Kasi) and strive to leave the body here, which is when one attains salvation. However, due to the strong grip man has in duality, the outer manifestation of this truth remained more popular with lakhs of people visiting these places every years in hope of salvation.

Similarly, the “Triveni Sangam” in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India is popular for the confluence of the 3 holy rivers meeting at one point, which is why it is called “triveni sangam”.

Every years millions of people come here to take a holy dip in the confluence of the 3 sacred rivers because of the belief that taking a holy dip in this divine spot will wash away one sins and grant liberation. However, great mystics have always pointed out that the real Triveni Sangam is the “heart space” that is the seat of the third eye, where the three nadis (rivers) meet. My Master would say that if by taking a dip in the confluence if one could get liberation then how is it that the fishes in that area have not been liberated. So, it is not actually in the gross that we endlessly keep striving, but the subtle which is the real. One is supposed to raise one’s consciousness by travelling up the lower chakras and reach the Agna chakra where is this holy confluence of the three nadis and take a dip in this spot. This is the same heart space that Bhagwan has been pointing to in the entire Chidakasha Gita. It is the same spot where he is stating that the real Kasi is this spot at the heart space, where one must dwell in and also “die” at. That is why he says that “the subtle Kasi is the Nirvikapla Kasi”. Nirvikalpa is the state of no mind, no desire, the eternal state of Shiva consciousness, which is why Bhagwan says in the beginning of the vese that “Shiva is from Kasi”.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 135

“‘Yukti’ (skill) is like walking on foot. Shakti is that which enters the heart. Sanyasa is like going on a train. He who goes on foot is a wanderer. The body is the train. The passenger in the train is Manas. If there are no passengers (Manas), the train will not move; tickets will not be issued; people will not gather. Then there is neither the first class nor the second nor the third, manas is the class of peace; the master of the chariot is Buddhi; the engine is the head; the nadis and the blood vessels are the screws; that which moves in the nadis and blood vessels is Vayu (air).

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan previously had used the words Yukti, Shakti & Mukti in verse 126. The word Yukti he refers to the logic/intelligence. The word Shakti  he refers to buddhi/intellect. The word Mukti he refers to liberation. In this verse he says walking on foot is Yukti (skill derived from intelligence) and Shatki is that which enters the heart (the discrimination of buddhi in the heart space). He then says that Sanyasa is like travelling by train and not travelling by walk because he says that the one who goes on foot wanders that than the one who takes a train and goes steadily and faster towards the destination. So he is referring to Sanyas as the superfast mode in the journey towards enlightenment.

For the train journey, he compares the body to the train and the passenger seated in the train as the mind. He says without passengers the train does not move, meaning the body needs the mind to move. Further he says that if there were no passengers (mind) the tickets would not be issued and there would be no people. Thus there would be no first class, second class or third class. The mind is the cause of all distinction and mind classifies as superior and inferior. It is mind that makes distinctions and classifications of first class, second class and third class. No mind, no distinctions, no classifications. He says thus that the Buddhi is the master of the vehicle, meaning Buddhi/intellect is the master of the mind and it discriminates rightly. He refers to the head as the engine and the screws and other parts as the nadis and blood vessels of the human body. He then reveals that what moves in the nadis and blood vessels is the Vayu, meaning prana. It is prana that nourishes and moves the body.  (For deeper insights about ‘prana’ please refer to verses 11, 32, 33, 45, 56, 59, 68, 69, 85, 92, 101, 105, 120 & 121).

So, in this verse Bhagwan says about the practice of pranayama (breathwork) and raise one’s consciousness to work more on the buddhi/intellect than the mind (which can wander). Sharpening the buddhi/intellect makes it the master of the mind, which will be able to then discriminate and end all distinctions of the mind, thus dissolving duality and resting in oneness, which is the final destination of the journey. But then he clearly mentions that there are two ways to move on the journey. One is by foot which means depending on the mind, and has risks of wandering. The other option he says is the fastest and steadiest and that is the journey of train (Sanyas) because Sanyas (desirelessness) takes one straight to the destination (liberation) and quickly too.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 136

He that saves you at the time of death is Shiva. It is not Hari. Shakti is in Shiva. Maya (delusion) is in Hari. Bodies are earthly. The bodily senses are all looking outwards. Shiva is internal; he is the Brahma-Randhra. That which is taught by others is no real knowledge; that which has come to your experience is real knowledge.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one that saves you at the time of death is Shiva and not Hari. Again, Shiva not as a being, but the Shiva consciousness, and not Hari, which is the maya. Shakti prevails in Shiva. (He has already spoken of how Shakti resides in Atman (Shiva) in verse 126. Shiva is internal and is the Brahmarandhra (see in-depth insights about Brahmarandhra in verse 59, 69, 85 & 121). Finally, he reveals that what you learn from outside (books and lectures) is not the real knowledge but the wisdom that comes to you from your own experience is the real knowledge. He is referring this inner secret of knowing the difference between Shiva and Hari, is what will really help you at the time of death and/or liberation and not the external wisdom gathered from outside.

Additional Notes

Much in-depth insights are already given on Shiva & Hari in verses 118, 127 & 128 and it is highly important that this concept of Shiva and Hari be clearly understood before anything further can be related to.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 137

When you have attained perfect peace, there is no necessity of going anywhere. There is no necessity of seeing anything. There is no necessity of going to Kasi, Rameshwara, Gokarna and other holy places. All is seen in the mind. Going and coming are delusions of the mind. When peace is attained, ALL appears to be the ONE. Liberation from bondage is seeing the ONE in ALL and the ALL in ONE. This is desirelessness. The thing in the hand must be seen in the hand itself . You cannot find it anywhere else. So also, everything must be tested in one’s own thought.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when the perfect peace is attained within, then there arises no need of going anywhere or seeing anything outside. Even the desire of going to holy pilgrimages like Kasi, Rameshwara, Gokarna and other such holy places ceases. All these places are now seen in the mind. One realises that all going and coming are only delusions of the mind. Bhagwan has previously spoken many times that ending all distinction and seeing oneness is the perfects state of desirelessness, which is liberation. In this verse, he clearly states that when perfect peace is attained, everything now appears to be ONE. The true liberation from bondage is seeing ONE in ALL and seeing ALL in ONE. This is desirelessness. He says just like how a thing held in the hand cannot be found elsewhere but has to be seen in the hand itself, everything must be tested in one’s own thought.

Additional Notes

How can one visit holy places in the mind?

Bhagwan talks of this seeing as a natural state that happens when all desires ceases and man achieves a state of desirelessness. It is because of desires that all outwardly things happen. It is desire to see or visit an outside place that manifests into a physical experience in that place. As in the deeper insights in previous verse 134 where Bhagwan elaborates on how true Kasi is situated in the heart space, this verse also speaks deeper on the same aspect. In that verse it was mentioned how everything in the cosmos is existent as microcosm and macrocosm, the internal and external, the nondual and the dual. All external holy pilgrimage spots are the external manifestations in the dual world, which is helpful for man to reach to the inner subtle manifestation. Just like through a dual manifestation of an idol of God, one is able to generate bhakti (devotion) and love that enables one to eventually realize the nondual (subtle) existence of the divine in that idol, all external pilgrimages must eventually lead one to realise the inner subtle divinity.  Desires make one outwardly and one enjoys the outward manifestations of creation. When eventually one reaches that state of desirelessness  all outwardly interests ceases and one begins experiences the true nondual subtle property of that external manifestation within himself, in the heart space. One realises then that all one needs to do is to travel within. This is why Bhagwan once said, “The heart is the hub of all sacred places. Go there, and roam.” But this cannot happen by force, but naturally, when one is naturally able to free oneself of desires eventually. This inner state then activates itself and one is able to achieve the same bliss inwardly that he once experienced outwardly.

There are more deeper aspects to this in the Siddha tradition where the Sages had developed such mastery of the mind that they could travel in their shookshma shareera (subtle body) to any given physical or astral location at the will of their mind. The modern concept of “teleportation”, “astral projection”, “astral travel”, “remote viewing” is much derived out of the same concept. These are possibilities but very rare feats achieved by rare masters, as it involves achieving great perfection and mastery over one’s mind and subtle bodies. This is very much demonstrated in the role that Sanjaya played in Mahabharata. Sanjaya was a charioteer and advisor to the blind king Dhritarashtra. He was devoted to the king and was also a disciple of sage Krishna Dwaipayana Veda Vyasa. As the Kurukshetra war was set to begin, Dhritarashtra was keen to follow the action on the battlefield without being physically present. He expressed this desire to Vyasa, who then summoned Sanjaya, and gifted him a divine power of “remote viewing”. This inner eye (that Bhagwan often speaks of in the Chidakasha Gita) allowed Sanjaya to witness everything that was to occur in the war from the comfort of his home, which he could report vividly to his king. In today’s scientific world, remote viewing is the visual perception technique that allows someone to gather information of a distant event using extrasensory perception (ESP).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 138

The real sunrise is to be seen in the sky of consciousness. This is the most excellent sunrise. The whole universe is to be seen in the heart space in one’s Self just as the sun is reflected in the water placed in a small mud vessel. When we travel by a cart, the whole world seems to be moving. Likewise, the whole universe can be known in yourself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Relating much with the previous verses that speak of the heightened states of a realised being experiencing the whole existence within one’s inner consciousness, Bhagwan says in this verse that the real magnificence of the most magnificent sunrise is seen in the sky of one’s inner consciousness (Chidakash). In this nondual state, the whole Universe is reflected in one’s heart space (third eye) of one’s Self just like how the Sun is reflected in water of a vessel. He cites that it is just like while you are moving in a cart (or a car) it appears that the whole world is also moving along with you, the whole Universe also can be experienced actually experienced similarly within you. 

Additional Notes

The Microcosm & Macrocosm

Bhagwan in this verse is saying that you don’t just exist in this Universe but the Universe also exists within you. What Bhagwan reveals in this verse is just the tip on an infinite iceberg, that has been interestingly studied by Science on the subject of microcosm and macrocosm. It is all on the phenomenon that the whole existence is a holographic creation of a microcosm (small universe) existing within a macrocosm (large universe) and within that micro is a macro and so on looped infinitely, just like a hologram. Its like saying you exist in the Universe and the Universe exists within you and with that Universe you exists and within that you exists the Universe and so on, a hologram. This phenomenon is wholly explained in the Chandogya Upanishad, which are the revelations by the great Rishis, who again through their Chidakasha itself explored the Cosmos and the mysteries of creation and then revealed it in the scriptures. Bhagwan touches the tip of that iceberg in this verse.

My Gurudev Avdhoot Shivanand ji, often taught on this subject where he would explain about the individual mind as  a microcosmic reflection of the macrocosmic cosmic mind. Just like each of us have a mind, there is a larger cosmic mind that is again within some larger cosmic mind. So, it is just like we have a physical or gross body, the whole Universe is a large gross body. Just like we have subtle sheaths like the etheric body, mental body, emotional body, bliss body, the whole gross Universe also has its subtle sheaths. So, its like in a larger Universe, I exist and within me all that is there in the Universe again exists. My whole body structure, the organs for example, are the planets. That is how each organ is related with each planet in the scriptures. It doesn’t end there. Each organ and its own Universe. Each cell has its own universe. It goes on, both at microscopic level and the telescopic or macroscopic level. Similarly, everything in the Universe has its own Universe within. Each tree, each fruit, each organism has within it another miniature holographic Universe. My Gurudev’s work in healing had much to do with this science and thus he often spoke about these subjects.

Charaka, says “Purushyo’yam loka sannidah” meaning “Man is a miniature universe”. The Yajurveda says “Yatha pinde tatha brahmande, yatha brahmande tatha pinde” meaning “As is the individual, so is the universe, as is the universe, so is the individual” or “As is the atom, so is the Universe” or “As is the human body, so is the Cosmic Body). Sankhya Darshana describes the human body as a mini universe and whatever elements or entities exist in the universe they exist in the human body also i.e, five fundamental elements (ether, air, fire, water and earth) of the universe. 

Swami Vivekananda says, “The whole of the universe is built upon the same plan as a part of it. So, just as I have a mind, there is a cosmic mind. As in the individual, so in the universal. There is the universal gross body; behind that there is a universal fine body; behind that a universal mind; behind that universal intelligence. And all this is in nature, the manifestation of nature, not outside of it”.

In another talk, he says, “Truth may be one and yet many at the same time, that we may have different visions of the same truth from different stand points. Just as nature is unity in variety an infinite variation in the phenomenal – as in and through all these variations of the phenomenal runs the infinite, the Unchangeable, the Absolute Unity, so it is with every man; the microcosm is but a miniature repetition of the macrocosm; in spite of all these variations, in and through them all runs this eternal harmony, and we have to recognise this”.

The scholar Sri Radha Vallabh Tripathi said, “The scientists who attempted to see the atom found a world within it that could not be described in ordinary language. They saw everything within the atom – the speed, energy, waves and matter all mixed. They found that if they could know the atom, they could know the whole truth of the cosmos. Yat pinde tad Brahmande – that which is in microcosm is in the macrocosm – that is what the ancient seers of the Upanishads had said — One is in all, All is in one.”

Chandogya Upanishads says, 

1. Om. There is in this city of Brahman an abode, the small lotus of the heart; within it is a small akasa. Now what exists within that small akasa, that is to be sought after, that is what one should desire to understand.

“As far as, verily, this great akasa extends, so far extends the akasa within the heart. Both heaven and earth are contained within it, both fire and air, both sun and moon, both lightning and stars; and whatever belongs to him (i.e. the embodied creature) in this world and whatever does not, all that is contained within it (i.e. the akasa in the heart).” ~ Chandogya Upanishad, 8-1-1/3

In ‘The Message of the Upanishads’ Swami Ranganadananda writes, “Indian thought conceived an intimate unity between the macrocosm of nature and microcosm of the human body, between the ‘Adibhautika’ and the ‘Adhyaatmika’ aspects of nature; the latter is an epitome of the former. The gods thus represent not only the forces of external nature mythically conceived, but also the sensory and thought forces within the man.”

Similarly, the 7 energy centers (chakras) in the human (pindanda) is the 7 cosmic centers (lokas) in the cosmos (Brahmanda)

Muladhara ~ Bhuloka
Svadhisthana ~ Bhuvarloka
Manipura ~ Svarloka
Anahata ~ Maharloka
Visuddhi ~ Janaloka
Ajna ~ Tapaloka
Sahasrara ~ Brahmaloka

Deep studies of astrology studies the influence of planets on humans and other living beings. All the aspects and elements in the macrouniverse (Brahmanda) does exist in the microuniverse (Pindanda) too. This is how man gets affected by the various weather changes in the nature.

MACRO COSMOS                 MICRO COSMOS
Fire                                                 Fire of Digestion
Land                                              Smell
Wind                                             Respiration
Water                                          All liquids in the body
Swarga                                        Head
Mountains                                Bulging bones
Stars                                             Hairs of the body
Rivers                                           Blood veins
Nine Planets                             Nine openings in the body

Out of 9 openings, the Sun and Moon rules over the 2 eyes.  Mercury and Venus represents the nostrils. Saturn and Mars represents ears. Raahu and Ketu indicates openings of the excretory organs.

Here are some interesting images that would give you deeper insight into this phenomenon.

 

 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 139

He who is hungry knows what hunger is. Similarly, everything is known to the Atman. When a train leaves a station, a wire is sent to the next station. When you throw a stone into a well, a sound is heard. So also, when Vayu is moving in the nadis, ‘ten kinds of sounds’ become audible.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when your body is hungry, you (the soul) will be immediately aware of this. The body organs will recognise when the body is dropping in energy and needs energy for sustenance by sending signals to the brain. The brain then sends signals to the digestive organs that begins the process of digestion, like the stomach begins secreting acids, the salivary glands secrete saliva and all such reactions in the body makes you aware of hunger and you decide to eat. Bhagwan says cites this beautiful example to make one understand that just like how you become aware of hunger when your body gets hungry, the Atman also becomes aware of everything within its consciousness. This is much in continuation to the previous verse where Bhagwan had mentioned how the whole Universe can be seen and experienced within one’s Chidakasha. This verse he is mentioning the same as to how you (the Atman) is aware of everything in the consciousness. More deeper insights into this can be in the verses like 7, 8 and 57 where Bhagwan had cited how Atman (soul) is a spark of Parmatman (Supreme) or how the individual consciousness is a manifestation of the supreme consciousness itself. But only due to the ego consciousness of the separateness from the supreme, the individual consciousness remains unconscious of this. When the ego dissolves and the individual consciousness realises its Self, it becomes aware of this reality of that god is within him and he is within god. Read the insights of the previous verse 138 on microcosm and macrocosm. This is what Bhagwan says in this verse how everything is known to the Atman. He also cites further the example that when the train leaves the station, a signal is sent to the next station informing about the movement of the train. He is pointing to the fact that the stations are aware of everything because all trains are moving within their interconnected network. He further cites another example of how when a stone is thrown into the well a sound is heard (when the stone hits the water) and the well becomes aware of this sound within itself. Similarly, he reveals that when vayu (prana) is moving freely in the nadis without any blockage, it is an indication of the purified state of the individual, which then validates itself with the experiencing of the 10 subtle sounds that cannot be heard by any ordinary man. In verse 3, it has already been explained in great details about what the 10 subtle sounds are and how are they heard after a certain level of purification.

An exact similar verse like this is also verse 100, that you may wish to read.

Overall, this verse speaks about a realised one being aware of everything happening inside and everything that is happening outside of him since he is being aware of that as an active conscious part of Creation.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 140

Suppose water is boiled in a vessel whose mouth is closed, then all the heat energy is concentrated in the vessel itself. When water comes out of a pump, we hear the sound of Omkar. We should abandon the forest path and tread the royal road. The energy moving downwards must be made to move upwards. The mind should know mind’s place.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse speaks about one devoting one’s energies in the stead and persistent raising of consciously only without wasting it for meaningless pursuits. Bhagwan has been reminding throughout Chidakasha Gita that the true goal of man is to realise the Omkar, the state of Oneness, the state of no distinction, the state of complete desirelessness, the state of godliness. He cites the example of how when water is boiled in a vessel whose lid has be shut closed, no heat in the vessel is lost and all the energy is concentrated powerfully in the vessel itself. Similarly a practitioner should raise one’s Kundalini upward through the path of the Sushumna. While doing so, the individual needs to be also careful and aware to not allow leakage or spillage of the energy by letting it flow downward but only upwards. Only then can the reach its destination in the heart space and achieve the state of Omkar. He also cites how when water is pumped in one direction without leakage, in its gushing out is heard the Omkar. So, Bhagwan says that we must abandon the forest path and tread the royal road. Forest path is the path of desires downwards that will lead one towards maya and keep away from one’s journey upwards. He says rather the seeker must abandon this forest path and steadily tread only on the royal path, that is the path upwards in the Sushumna nadi to reach the Chidakasha (center of eyebrows). He says that the mind should know its real place.

Additional Notes

Meaning of energy be made to move upward…

After the Kundalini being activated, the energy constantly keeps moving up and down through the nadis that are connected through the 7 main chakras. It is the very nature of energy to rise upward which is towards evolution. What disrupts the free upward flow of the energy are the blockages in the subtle nadis and the chakras. The higher intention of the seeker to evolve and to reach one’s highest potential is what fuels the energies to rise up. This progression upwards towards ascension is known as urdhvagati. Good deeds, devotion, purity of mind, servitude, chastity, prayers, meditation, breathwork, yoga, holy activities, positive thinking,  uplifting others, charity, positive emotions like happiness, joy, cheerfulness, love, compassion, kindness, and such activities help raise one’s energies upward.

At the same time, lower desires or those of lower tendencies fuels the energies in the opposite downward direction. This regression downwards towards declination is known adhogati.  Bad deeds, unhealthy lifestyle, unholy activities, negative thinking, causing harm and injury to others, addictions, sexual activities, cravings and desires towards materialism, negative emotions like hatred, jealously, anger, fear, sadness, etc encourage downward flow of the energies. It is both ways – the direction of the flow determines the qualities and tendencies of a person OR the tendencies of a person determines the direction of flow of the energies – both are interdependent and influence each other both ways. 

What is this energy that moves upward or downwards

The energy is the prana shakti. In the Chidakasha Gita Bhagwan refers many times to it as Vayu (air). In one of the previous verse (139) he said that “when vayu (prana) moves through the nadis (which happens only when the nadis are purified), one hears the 10 subtle sounds.” It was explained in depth in the previous insights here (see verse 3) how the ability to hearing the subtle sounds (anhad naad) is a very heightened state of consciousness that Bhagwan refers to as the state of becoming the Omkar, which is mukti (liberation).

Now, this is the same vayu (prana) that is the energy that we are talking about in this verse that moves upwards and its path of movement is through the subtle network of nadis, in which we have elaborately discussed about the 3 main nadis – Sushumna Nadi, Ida Nadi and Pingala nadi of the network of 72,000 nadis (see verse 2 for details). All the breathwork (pranayama) that Bhagwan refers to in the Chidakasha Gita is towards the purification of these nadis, for it is only when these nadis are purified that the prana flows easily through them upwards. A Yogi is well aware of this and hence for this own good, he keeps watchful discipline over his thoughts, behavior and lifestyle and lives a conscious life while practicing yoga and pranayam (breathwork) that help him channel his energies upward. There are many practices in the Kundalini yoga taught by the able Guru to facilitate the Kundalini shakti upwards. The seeker practices these modalities to help keep the energies raises.

Ojas – Conversion of sexual energy to spiritual energy

Now, more deeper, this prana energy has two forms. When it is activated it is in the gross form, which is the sexual energy. Procreation is sexual energy, which means creation is sexual energy. Everything that is created in creation is this prana, the gross form of which is the sexual energy. This sexual energy is activated in the mooladhara chakra where the Kundalini is activated. This is the force that moves upwards. When this gross energy moves upwards it begins to become subtler and subtler and gets converted into spiritual energy. So in simple terms, when the energy raises up and flows upwards and higher it is the spiritual energy that is utilised for higher forms of abstract forms of creation like creativity, music, poetry, and has expressions of compassion, empathy, oneness, and unconditonal love. When if flows downwards it is the sexual energy that gets utilised into grosser creations sexual pleasures, materialistic pleasures, procreation, etc. The lower pull is all towards maya towards bondage. The upward pull is all away from maya towards liberation. This is a constant movement that keeps happening in the lives of humans and the purpose of a Yogi becomes to eventually steady this only upwards. Technically, that is the one goal all the spiritual practices on this earth.

When this prana moves downwards it gets depleted as it flows out as sperm or menstrual fluids.  When the same sperm or menstrual fluids move up, it  gets converted into spiritual energy called OJAS. Hence, for a Yogi sexual abstinence is of highest importance. It should be noted that one drop of semen is manufactured from 40 drops of blood, thus one can note how valuable this fluid is! There are many schools of practice where one lives as a householder and engages in sexual union with his legitimate spouse but then practices the process of seed retention where there is no ejaculation. The entire school of Taoism practices this strongly as they value the importance of right balance of worldly and spiritual living. This is one major reason why Sanyas is one of the very prominent path on the journey to liberation, in which Yogis practice Bramhacharya (celebacy) for this main reason. However, it is important to note that this may not be possible for all who are not yet developed to this state of renunciation due to underlying vasanas and tendencies, for whom the path of Grihasta is advised, which also Bhagwan endorsed to the larger crowd, to whom he specifically advised “moderation”. He has many times advised the path of Raja Yoga (Ashtanga Yoga) that practices moderation in everything. (See verse 33 & 81).

This sexual fluid transmutes itself to ojas and reaches the brain, where the brain is fully nourished by this powerful Ojas that replenishes and rejuvenates the brain. All the Yogis who have mastered longevity and immortality have achieved this state verily through this process itself. All the Masters who have converted themselves to light have done it through this process itself. This is very purified state of consciousness where everything gross is converted to subtle and since there is no grossness left, the body turns to light.

The practice of many Yogasanas (part of Ashtanga Yoga) like Shirshasana, Sarvangasana and Oordhva Padmasana, and Viparitakarani Mudra all help in raising the Ojas. The four main Bandhas (locks) in yoga are Moola Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha, Jalandhara Bandha and Maha Bandha are also of key importance in this process. These are combined with many breathwork that Bhagwan has been referring to in Chidakasha Gita (10, 11, 12, 20, 32, 33, 45, 85, 92, 101, 105, 120 & 121) which work on raising up the energy (prana) to higher chakras until purification happens and finally the Kundalini shakti is able to rest in the seat of the third eye (Agna chakra) – the heart space, the Chidakasha.

Tips to help in conservation and raising of prana

A life of awareness is highly advised. When one lives a conscious life, one is able to observe strict continence in thought, word and deed. One is able to give up thinking useless and vain thoughts that waste the vital prana. One is able to maintain balance of mind in all conditions and circumstances. Contemplation on the higher purposes and contemplating on the Divine becomes easier. Energy can be preserved by constant repetition of the divine mantras like “Aum Namo Bhagawathey Nithyanandaya” or any Guru mantra or divine mantra that resonates with you. Meditation is a great tool in the activation of prana and generation of prana. Mindful study of sacred scriptures help greatly. Practicing a conscious life of vairagya, meaning the practice of mindfully living detached to worldly objects helps in making moderate use of the things needed for the purpose of sustenance in the world, without being addicted to it. It is best to be aware and mindful of thoughts, things, activities or environments that stimulate or excite the senses, leading to downward pull of energies. Sharpening the buddhi (intellect) with all the methods suggested in the Chidakasha Gita helps a great deal in developing Viveka.

As dispassion increases, the leaks in the vital energy also decreases.  The greater the Vairagya (non-attachment to worldly objects) the more secure will be the sexual fluids. The more the preservation of the sexual fluids, the greater will be its transmutation into Ojas which means more abundant physical, mental, moral and spiritual strength for quicker evolution. Pranayam (breathwork) helps a lot in gaining control over the mind, which means gaining control over the Prana Shakti and preventing its leakage. Further it depends on the resolution and intense desire of the practitioner with deeper sadhnas to intensify the process of sublimation of the sexual energy into spiritual energy. 

What diminishes and depletes Ojas:

  • Anxiety, fear, worry, sorrow, grief and stress
  • Lack of proper sleep
  • Strong, bright, overpowering sensations or experiences
  • Excessive use of computer, mobile, television
  • Loss of vital fluids (blood and semen)
  • Excessive sexual activities
  • Grumbling, complaining, judging, criticism
  • Use of medical or recreational drugs and stimulants
  • Suppressed emotions and feelings
  • Improper fasting
  • Stale/junk/processed food or food devoid of prana
  • Unnatural environments
  • Overworking
  • Over-exercising
  • Wrong lifestyle habits
  • Incorrect breathing practices

What enhances and increases Ojas:

  • Living in accordance to nature’s solar-lunar rhythms
  • Yoga, Pranayam and other breathwork
  • Meditation
  • Practicing acceptance, forgiveness and unconditional love
  • Practicing detachment and contentment
  • Creative pursuits like music, singing, dancing, poetry
  • Practice of Tai Chi/Chigong
  • Living in natural habitats
  • Gardening, cultivation 
  • Following proper regular dinacharya (daily routine) and rtucharya (seasonal routine)
  • Nutrition with properly cooked, vegetarian food, without overuse of spices
  • Pure cow milk, pure cow ghee, fresh butter
  • Fresh nuts, honey, dates
  • Organic whole grains, rice, fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Being more aware of sexual health and your body chemistry
  • Ayurvedic herbs
  • Living a conscious life of awareness

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 141

A boat does not sail where there is no water. So also, if Vayu does not move, there is no blood circulation. When circulation is stopped, heat ceases to be generated. When the generation of heat ceases, there is no digestion of food. So also, a train cannot move without fire.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan in this verse mentions the importance of prana for the sustenance of the human being. The importance of conservation of the vital prana and also utilising it for the highest spiritual upliftment has been emphasised in great detail in the previous verses (140). In continuation to that, Bhagwan gives an example of how important is the movement of prana in the human being.  He explains this with two examples. He refers to how the boat cannot sail without water. Similarly, he says, that if Vayu (prana) does not move properly in the nadis, it effects the blood circulation, indicating that it is the vital force prana that helps the movement of blood (blood circulation) through the blood vessels. Further he states that when blood circulation stops, there is no heat generated. When no heat is generated, it effects the digestive fires (jatar-agni) and digestion is hampered. Similarly, he also gives the example of a train, stating that the train cannot move without heat. He is referring to the steam engine that needs heat (fire) to be converted to steam (prana) that gives movement to the train. (Read verse 135).

So, in this verse Bhagwan is explaining how important it is for prana to move and so how important it is to keep the channels clear for the prana to move freely. Prana moves through the nadis and moves freely only when the nadis are clean. Blockages in the nadis restrict the flow of prana which causes detrimental effects to the human body and spiritual evolution. Many verses in the Chidakasha Gita is consistently referring to the purification of nadis through breath-work (pranayam). You can read in depth about it in verses 11, 32, 33, 45, 56, 59, 68, 69, 85, 92, 101, 105, 120, 121, 135, 139, 140).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 142

Without a rope, water from a well cannot be drawn up. In the body, breath is the rope. Drawing the inward breath harmoniously is like drawing up the water from a well.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan, again, mentions about the internal breath which he had spoken first in Chidakasha Gita in verse 6. You may read the insights there to understand what is the internal breath about. In this verse, he gives the example of the water being drawn up from the well with the help of a bucket and rope. The rope is being referred to the breath. He says that drawing the breath needs to be as harmoniously the water is pulled up the well. But the most important point that Bhagwan is indicating towards in this verse is that “without the rope (breath) water cannot be drawn up.” What is water? It is the Kundalini Shakti that is being referred to. Without breath it ideaths not possible to drawn the Kundalini shakti up. The goal of the seeker is to raise the Kundalini to the Brahmarandhra (see verse 59, 69, 85, 121 & 136) and for that breath plays a vital role in this practice.

Additional Notes

Why breath is so important?

The Kundalini shakti is the very powerful force which is safe when it rises naturally depending upon the constitution of the seeker for the cosmic intelligence of the shakti works for the highest good when everything is natural (sehaj). However, there are practices under Kundalini Yoga or the Shaktipath Yoga, where an able Master is able to help raise the Kundalini shakti of the disciples, after the process of initiation (Shaktipath). Shaktipath is the process of activating the dormant Kundalini shakti of the practitioner through the intent and will of the Kundalini Master. After the initiations, certain methods are taught to the practitioner on the art of skilfully mastering the breath and working with the Kundalini Shakti. The breath is not the physical breath, but the subtle prana that moves up and down with every breath. The up and down movement of prana happens in the subtle Sushumna Nadi in resonance with the physical inhalation and exhalation of breath in the lungs. The whole idea of making the prana move up and down the Sushumna nadi is because this is the path that needs to be purified for free movement of the energy upwards and this breathwork cleanses the passage with every practice. When the whole Sushumna Naid is purified, it can be considered to be a fully conducive vessel as the consciousness has risen and established itself in the Bramharandhra and reached it’s destination. (See verse 59, 69, 85, 121 & 136).

But on this path it is never advisable that one try and attempt these processes on their own due to the risks involved in ‘playing’ with the Shakti. The path that Bhagwan refers to is the Raj Yoga (Ashtanga Yoga) which is all a step by step process of the 8 limbs in which gradually the practitioner gains momentum and keeps evolving. The Chidakasha Gita is a good guide to such practitioners. However, Bhagwan also speaks of the importance of having a Guru on this path, who can guide and lead the seeker to the final destination. (To see references on ‘Guru’ please read verses 27, 28, 29, 35, 63, 84, 89, 103, 103, 128, 185, 188, 228 & 285)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 143

In order to make planks of a wooden beam, it should be sawed up and down. Similarly, breath should move upwards and downwards in the body. It should be led into Buddhi and made always to move in an upward direction. To take a stone up hill, requires great effort but to bring it down by the same route is not difficult. So also, going up is difficult but coming down is easy. It is difficult for the Prana to leave the body. To receive a thing is easy but to return it is difficult. Those men who do not return what they have received are not worthy of the name of ‘men’. The are merely animals; they have no virtue.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In this verse, in continuation to the previous verses on internal breath, Bhagwan stresses further into the how one should be engaged consistently in moving the subtle breath up and down (the spinal column) in the body. He cites with an exsubtample of the sawing of wood in oder to make wooden planks with the up and down breathing pattern in the body. Pranayama teaches the systemic breathing work, but Kundalini Yoga teaches the deeper breathwork of Sushumna breathing, which is what Bhagwan is referring to when he says moving the breath up and down. As discussed in previous verses this is not the physical breath that Bhagwan is talking about but is the subtle breath (prana),  the movement of which he says, should be always directed in the upward direction so that it be led into the heart space (Chidakasha) where in enlightens the Buddhi (intellect). Because when the Buddhi is purified, Viveka is sharpened in the seeker. When Viveka sharpens one is able to easily discriminate between the real and unreal. All distinctions will thus end and oneness experienced. This is the prime objective of Chidakasha Gita, as explained by Bhagwan in multiple verses in the book. He also cautions how it difficult it is to push a stone uphill but how easy it is to bring it down the same route. With this example he is referring to how difficult it is for one to keep the energy raised by channeling it upwards but how easy it is for the energy to flow downwards and drain out if one is not conscious and aware. It is easy for energy to flow downwards because of the pull of lower desires, temptations, compulsions and all such tendencies resulting from one’s stored vasanas. To raise the energy upwards means going opposite to this pull and instead channelling the energies upwards and reaching it to the higher centers. It needs all the five senses to be active in order to satiate one’s desires, and that is when the prana moves downwards with the sense organs. Thus it is always easier for one’s energies to move  downwards than upward. Thus Bhagwan says that at the time of death it becomes difficult for prana to leave the body because by habit it will tend to flow downwards. A seeker well aware at this point that he must leave through the highest possible energy center, simply because his state of evolution and his further spiritual journey is determined by which door/gate he exits at the time of death (for deeper insights on the 10 doors please read verse 59).

He then says that to receive something is very easy but to return it is so difficult. This statement has so much relevance to the verse that stresses on raising one’s consciousness. Taking birth is easy but embracing death is difficult. It means receiving a body from the 5 elements of nature is very easy but returning back to the five elements is difficult. Returning back to the 5 elements means purifying the body. It is easy to grow up into an adult but difficult to become a child again. (For deeper insights into purifying the 5 elements and on becoming a child again read verses 91, 92 & 93). The essence of this statement is simply that we have received this life from the Supreme which has manifested itself in this body for a purpose and after fulfilment of the purpose it must be returned back to the Source. Bhagwan says it is easy to receive it but difficult to give it back. Giving back means giving it back in purified form that one received it. Like the verses 91, 92 & 93 elaborates how as a child one is very pure but eventually loses its purity as it catches on with the world and gets influenced by Maya. The sole purpose of man on earth is to purify it sos that he can return to Source. This must be done and if not done, then one is not worthy to be called a human. This is why Bhagwan says, “Those men who do not return what they have received are not worthy to be called men, they are merely animals as they have no virtue.” Living a human life driven by the senses are termed as “animalistic” by all scriptures as the tendency is only on survival, enjoyment, reproduction, territory,  security, and selfish existence which are animalistic features known as pashu bhaav. So a human living in ignorance such a life for only oneself is virtueless and thus not referred to as a human life but an animal. Human life is that of virtue that extends much beyond one’s own self and a life lived for others. All this can happen only when the consciousness is risen in the human, which motivates him to purify himself so that his animalistic tendencies turn to humanly tendencies and further purifies to godly tendencies. When that happens, the purpose of the human birth is fulfilled and one is ready to exit the samasara easily and readily, which is a state where the prana flows upwards very easily and easily reaches to the highest center in the Brahmarandhra where prana exits the human body to be merged with the Supreme Source. This is returning back what one has received from the Supreme back to the Supreme.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 144

(It is impossible to describe the pangs of death). Jnana is attained by subtle thinking. So breath should be controlled. The mind should be merged in the sound.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

The verse starts with a line that it is impossible to explain the pangs of death. In this verse Bhagwan is again explaining how the real process of death (liberation) should be. He says that Jnana (wisdom) is attained by subtle thinking. Here he is referring to the subtle wisdom. Gross wisdom is what one attains from the gross mind, gross outer worldly wisdom and subtle wisdom is what is attained from the subtle mind, subtle intellect (see verse 128), and subtle inner wisdom. It is only through subtle intellect that one will acquire the subtle wisdom of the self and realise the self. For that the breath needs to be controlled and when through control of breath of is able to direct the prana up into the Bramharandhra, one is able to hear the 10 subtle sounds (dasa naada) More in depth about the 10 subtle sounds are explained in verses 3, 62, 139 & 140. It all leads to the primordial sound of Omkar, the source of everything. When one hears this sound in the depths of the mind in the space of the heart (Chidakasha), the mind must be merged into that sound. Bhagwan has said in verses 109, 110, 111, & 130 about the the Omkar and how the mind dissolves into Omkar 109 & 133 and how in Omkar the mind is completely destroyed, thus one attaining liberation. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 145

He who has a burden on his head, has his attention on the burden. Similarly, he who acts the part of a king in a field drama, has his attention fixed on the crown. Likewise, Jnanis have their attention fixed on Buddhi.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In this verse Bhagwan is stating how every individual’s attention and focus will always remain on only that what is of utmost priority and importance to that individual. He says that the one who has a burden on his head will have his whole attention on the burden. Similarly, the actor who is playing the role of a King in a drama, has his whole attention fixed on the crown on his head so that it doesn’t fall off. Likewise, Bhagwan says tht Jnanis (the awakened) have their whole attention fixed on Buddhi, meaning they have their attention of being conscious (state of awareness).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 146

Manas (mind) is inferior to Buddhi (intelligence). Buddhi is the king. Manas is the prime minister. The prime minister must go to the palace often to see the king. So also, Manas is the king of the body.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that one must not allow the mind to become the king because if the mind becomes the king, then it will  one allows that, then one will simply carry out decisions and actions based on whatever the mind says. Mind always says everything based on the imprints or memories of the past incidents and experiences (which might not necessarily be the truth or righteous) or from the knowledge it has gathered from outside (which also may not necessarily be truthful or right). The intellect (buddhi) is what discriminates between right and wrong, good or bad. Without an active intellect, a person becomes the slave of his mind, unable to control his thoughts, emotions and actions and goes indiscriminately with what his mind says. But if the intellect is sharp (see verse 16), its becomes the king and the mind remains a minister, important and useful, but under the control of the king (intellect).  The same has been exactly told by Bhagwan previously in verse 23.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 147

Gas light has no luster before the midday sun-light. Light is of use only when it is dark. When a man is hungry, he does not consider the difference of castes. Similarly, in sound sleep, there is no hunger. Then, Manas is absent. Just so, a man must sleep the sleep of yoga. Only such men are Jnanis.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the light of a gaslamp light is no significance before the mid-day sunlight. The gaslight is only significant in darkness. Similarly, the mind of an average human is like the gaslight. There are different gaslamps of different religion, caste, creed, color, race, etc. But when the sun shines all the light of all the different gaslamps are nullified and of no significance or distinction. He is referring the light of the sun to a perfected man (self-realised) whose light is eternal and enlightening than an imperfect man’s (gaslight) limited light of wisdom, that is filled with distinctions and diversities. Bhagwan says that it is the mind of the ignorant that sees all such distinctions. When a many is really hunger, he doesn’t bother about castes or other such distinctions. A starving rich man will not think of race or caste when he receives food from a poor man; all his distinctions vanish before hunger. The mind is the cause of all distinctions. This very same hunger vanishes when in sound sleep. This is because the mind is absent in sleep. So, a man must sleep, Bhagwan says, the sleep of Yoga and that only the man who sleeps the sleep of Yoga is a Jnani (liberated being). The sleep of Yoga is known as Yog Nidra. (For more deeper insights into what is Yog Nidra read verses 10 & 11) 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 148

Take ten men; their Bhakti is not of an identical nature. When ten people are going on a journey, if one of them sits to take rest, the remaining nine will also do the same. Likewise, one man is inspired with Bhakti; other people, by seeing or hearing him become also Bhaktas.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that each individual is different and not even any two are alike. He says that even though a group of 10 people are together, it is not necessary that their bhakti (devotion) would be similar or identical to each other. but still they influence each other greatly. Everyone resonates with a certain frequency depending on their level of consciousness. The higher frequencies or vibrations does have greater influence on the lower vibrations. In the previous verse (147) Bhagwan had referred to this still by stating how the gaslight from a gaslamp has no significance in the magnificent splendour of the sun’s light. The sun’s light floods all the other little lights and all that remains is the sunlight. In this verse he thus says that if 10 people are going on a journey and if one of them sits to rest, the other 9 also follow suit and does the same. Likewise, he says, if one man is instilled with devotion, the others around him, by seeing and listening to him are positively influenced and also become Bhaktas (devotees) filled with devotion. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 149

You do not feel the scent of a flower which is in your own hand. Flowers which are distant smell sweet. Babies whose brains are not developed, see no difference in the things of the world. When their brains are developed, they see the difference in things. Until a baby is six months old, it feels no differences. A first class yogi is like a baby of this type. If you give a diamond to a baby, it throws it way. To such babies, pebbles and diamonds are the same. Similarly, to true Jnanis, a lump of earth and money are the same. They have no desires of any sort. They see the one Atman everywhere. All is seen in the Atman and the Atman in all. This vision is internal. What is called internal vision is “subtle discrimination”. Subtle discrimination is Shiva Shakti. Shiva Shakti is the indivisible Shakti of the Para-Brahma. What is Para-Brahma-Shakti is the Atman. This is the ONE reality.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that you do not sense the fragrance of a flower which is in your own hand but easily smell the flowers that are distant from you. It may be easy to spot or realise an enlightened being from a distance but difficult to recognise a Jnani (enlightened being) right amidst us. The Jnani is the one who sees no difference or distinction of any kind in the world around him. Bhagwan compares a Jnani to a baby child. (For more insights on this comparison read verses 92 & 93). He says that babies whose brains are not yet developed (5-6 months), see no difference in the world. For them everything and everyone are alike. No caste, creed, religion, gender, title, nationality, status, position, name can create even the least distinction between one from another in the eyes of a child. Until a baby is 6 months old, it feels no difference as it is still in its pure form, unadulterated by the dual world yet. Bhagwan says that a first-class Yogi is like this baby. If you give a diamond to the baby (or such a Yogi) it throws it away because to such a baby (or Yogi) pebbles and diamonds are the same. To true Jnanis, a lump of earth and money are the same. This is because desires are absolutely absent in them. The state they are in is a state of desirelessness, a perfected, liberated state. They only see the ONE atman (supreme) everywhere. All is seen in the Atman and Atman is seen in all. This is the state of Advaita (nonduality).

Bhagwan again refers back to how this is an internal state of ‘subtle discrimination’ which reaches one to this state. He says that Shiva and Shakti are the two indivisible forms of the ONE supreme PARABRAHMAN. The Atman (Soul) is birthed from Parmatman (Supreme) and thus the Parabrahma-Shakti is nothing but the Atman itself. (For deeper insights into how Atman and Paramatman are one, read verses 7, 8, 9 & 57. For deeper insights ‘on subtle discrimination’ read verse 126. For more insights on the principle of ‘Shiva-Shakti’ read verse 61).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 150

Reality is the Prana in man. He is a man who thinks (ruminates) rightly. This correct thinking (right discrimination) is the real goal of man. Everything is attainable by practice. By practice, everything becomes known.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the reality in man is the prana. Prana is the vital force of the Supreme, which is what is real in man as it is indivisible and imperishable. (For deeper insights about prana read verse 68, 92 & 121). Only when the prana reaches the higher centers after purification of the nadis, does subtle thinking happen. Subtle thinking comes from a sharpened buddhi (intellect) that can discriminate between the right and the wrong, between the real and the unreal. Bhagwan says that correct thinking is the real goal of every man. Meaning raising the prana to the Brahmarandhra, which is when a purified and rightful thinking happens. (For more in sights on this read verse 69). So Bhagwan says he is a “man” who thinks rightly, meaning the one who has succeeded in raising the prana to the Brahmarandhra or in other words achieved self-realisation. He then assures that everything is attainable by practice and that practice everything becomes known, all the secrets of life open up. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 151

If you keep a seed safe in a box, it will not yield plenty. If you sow it in the earth and cultivate it, one seed yields thousands. From one lamp, you can light a thousand lamps. One tree produces thousands of flowers. Flower is the downward state. The tree is the upward state.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

 

Bhagwan says that if you keep a seed safe in a box, it will not yield anything but if you sow it in the earth and cultivate it, one seed will yield thousands of trees. Meaning, divine wisdom must not remain only with oneself for it will not yield anything, but if it is shared with the world, it is like sowing seeds of divine wisdom in the hearts of the people that will sprout towards becoming the tree of wisdom which will then, when ripe, yield flowers and fruits. 

Similarly, he says that from one lamp you can  light a thousand lamps and the beauty is that no lamp loses its light when it lights up another lamp. This is what truly is the meaning of “Jyotse Jyot Jagao, Sadguru, Jyotse Jyot Jagao. Mera antar timir mitao, Sadguru, Jyotse Jyot Jagao…” (Light my lamp with your lamp of Master, light my lamp with your lamp. Light up and end my inner darkness, O Master, light my lamp with your lamp.)

Then he says, each tree then produces thousands of flowers. He says that flower is the downward state and the tree is the upward state. The same reference Bhagwan had already made in verse 15 where he had said, “On a tree grow numberless flowers; the flowers all perish; but the tree does not perish for a long time. The visible is like flowers, the invisible is like the tree.” There he is talking of the invisible soul that does not perish for long. He compares the soul to a tree that remains for a very long time than the flowers that everyday blossom, fall, die and perish. He refers the flowers to the visible things on the earth, and that everything that is seen is short-lived and perishes with time, but what does not perish and remains for a long time is the soul. Why does he say tree remains for long time or the soul remains for a long time. Like how the tree also perishes after a long time and returns back to nature by dissolving into the five elements, similarly the soul also after a long time of multiple births and evolution, finally returns back to its Source – god consciousness. So he calls the flower a downward state and the tree an upward state.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 152

If we sow a gold coin in the earth, it will never sprout.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if a gold coin is sowed in the earth, it will never sprout. The worldly desires and the glitters of the materialistic world is the gold coin that he is referring to. In the previous verse (151) he mentioned that if a seed is sowed in the earth it will sprout, because it has life. A gold coin may have more grosser value bit is lifeless. A seed is infused with the cosmic life, the life force energy of the creator that can infuse life and replicate life like the creator (Aham Brahmasmi) but a gold coin how much ever its value may be determined, cannot replicate another gold coin out of it. Whereas a one single seed can produce a tree full of thousands of fruits and thus thousands of seeds that have the potential to become a thousand trees. Same is the divine wisdom that is sown in the hearts of others that will only grow and multiply manifold and will remain steady like the tree for long. But anything of materialistic value will only perish with time like the flowers that fall and wither away in a limited time.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 153

“A lifeless thing is soundless. It is gross. A living thing has ‘Shabda-Brahma’ (can produce sound). The universe is nothing but ‘consciousness’. When you build a house, you must first lay a foundation and afterwards, raise the walls. So also, there is no effect without a cause.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In the previous two verses (151 & 152) Bhagwan had mentioned about seed that is infused with life because it has the capability to reproduce when sown in the earth whereas a lifeless gold coin is of no value when it comes to reproducing when sown in the earth. With sound he is referring to the Shabda Brahma (cosmic sound) which is present in every living being. The whole Universe is nothing but the manifestation from sound, Shabda Brahma (see additional notes). He says that everything in this Universe functions under the cause and effect principle. Like, to build a house, you must first lay a foundation only after which you can raise the walls. Cause is the foundation and effect is the raised walls to become a house. (For deeper insights into cause and effect read verse 31). Similarly, to build up a spiritual life, it is necessary to lay the foundation. Guru lays the strong foundation upon which a strong spiritual life is built. Guru becomes the cause who sows the seed of Shabd (cosmic sound of cosmic mantra) into the seeker and the effect is the gradual raising of the walls and the building of a house, a ripened spiritual being that grows into a tree ready to produce more fruits.

Additional Notes

What is Shabda Brahman?

Shabda or sound means sound and Shabda Brahman means the Sound of Brahman or Sound of God. From the Shabd Brahman, the entire creation manifested. The secrets of how the vibrations from the primordial sound created the whole cosmos is unravelled in the sacred wisdom of Advait Sri Vidya. In Sri Vidya, it is explained how when there was nothing an intent in the consciousness created a ripple of vibration, the vibration of Om, which then rippled further creating all the Universes, lokas, etc. A concept similar to Shabda Brahman i.e. God in the form of sound (Word); is also seen in the Bible, where it is said “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.—John 1.1”.  The Sri Chakra is the geometrical representation, the center of which is a dot, which is called the Bindu from where the primordial sound emanated. Hence the term “Naad Bindu”. The ripples from this point are the geometry of Sri Chakra which has all the multiple planes and dimensions explained in it, one loka of which is the Bhu Loka (our planet earth) which also is made of sound frequency and so is everything in it made of sound. 

This sound of God or the sound of the Supreme Creator (Shabd Brahman) is pure unlimited awareness. Living beings also have awareness but it is limited awareness. Difference is that human awareness can be referred to as a limited human will, which is aware and has free will but is limited. But the God’s awareness (Shabd Brahman) can be referred to as the unlimited Divine will, which is powerful enough create, sustain and destroy life. It is powerful and operates on the cosmic intelligence, which we call as Divine Will. It created the cosmos and prevails in everything as cosmic intelligence. However, even inert (nonliving) things are made up of sound, but this is inert and without awareness and thus does not have any potential to do anything on its own.

However, man has awareness but with limitations. Every aspect of human being also is sound (vibration).  Every subtle koshas of human is made of vibration. Every chakras have a certain frequency of sound which is why it is referred to as “seed sound”  or Beej Mantras. Now since humans have awareness (limited) he is able to alter his realities through his freewill, like he may use the his awareness to use the power of mantras to alter his life and life circumstancs. Mantra is nothing but sound. When chanted, each mantra produces a certain vibration that impacts the surroundings in which it is used. So whenever the chakras tune out of the natural vibrational frequency, disease sets in. This is when the practice of reciting the respective beej mantra of the affected chakra produces the natural sound of perfect state, the vibration of which begins to align and restore the health of the chakra and thus the organs related to the chakra also begin tuning back to health. Thus every physical part of the human body is also made up of sound. Since human is a spark of the Creator, the Shabd Brahman is in his core but due to the ego consciousness this unlimited awareness of the Divine plays more as limited awareness. That is how humans cannot function like God even though he is a part of God. It is only when the human consciousness expands, ego consciousness dissolves, and he realises his true Self, the Shabd Brahman in him becomes fully active and such a being then begins functioning with unlimited awareness, much God-like.  This is how the great Rishis who meditated on the Shabd Brahman (word of God or sound of God) ultimately became That. Their dissolving of ego consciousness dissolved their freewill which surrendered more to the Divine Will (Shabd Brahman) that now began functioning through them. So the Rishis were able to do miracles like the Divine. They could manifested things out of thin air. It was not magic but they simply knew the science of sound. What they speak or even think through their unlimited awareness become a blessing or curse. The words or intent of a person who is not awakened yet will not have similar impact. Similarly, an inert object has no awareness and hence is as good as lifeless. This is why Bhagwan in this verse says, “A lifeless thing is soundless. It is gross. A living thing has ‘Shabda-Brahma’ (can produce sound).” and in the previous verse (152) speaks on how inert thing are lifeless – he says, “If we sow a gold coin in the earth, it will never sprout.”

A self-realised Guru who has become one with the Creator has the potent Shabd Brahman within him, which is how he impacts the consciousness of other human beings who are attuned to him by activating their awareness, which Bhagwan in verse 151 says, “If you sow it in the earth and cultivate it, one seed yields thousands. From one lamp, you can light a thousand lamps. One tree produces thousands of flowers.”

Shabd Brahman is thus the AWARE sound of the Divine or God.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 154

Those who are physically blind have no knowledge of forms. To such, light is of no use. Those who have destroyed mental modifications, have destroyed all desires. Such people are not subject to dreams.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who are physically blind do not have any understanding of forms and shapes because they cannot see. The light is of no use to a physically blind person. Similarly, the ones who have destroyed all their desires have destroyed all their modifications (subtle impressions) in the mind and now are not subject to any dreams.

Additional Notes

What are ‘modifications of the mind’ and their relation with dreams

Modifications of the mind means the fluctuations or thought waves in the mind. These fluctuations are known as vrittis. (Read insights of verse 49). These fluctuations arises from the psychic impressions stored in the deep recesses of the subconscious mind. All these vrittis are constantly fluctuating in the Chitta (the canvas of the mind). Vrittis are what Bhagwan refers to as the Chanchal Mann (restless mind or fickle mind).  A vritti plays on the mind screen and then subsides,  leaving an impression in the subconscious mind, which is known as samskara or samksaras impression. The sum total of all samksaras is known as Karmasays or Sanchita Karma. All samksaras, of this life plus of all previous innumerable lives are stored in the Chitta and these can be the samksaras of animal incarnation (dogs, cats, etc.), samksaras of a godly life (the gods of higher dimensions), samksaras of raj yog of a kingly life, samksaras of the life of a blacksmith  or a goldsmith, etc In the current human life, only the samksaras of the current birth type will become active and the rest of the other samskaras will remain inactive and dormant. However, these vrittis can surface anytime to relive itself.

So, the vrittis are constantly rising from the ocean of Chitta and playing itself on the canvas of the mind. Shifting into awareness helps one watch the vrittis, and when they are watched as a detached observer, the vrittis collapse into the Chitta like the waves collapsing back into the ocean. This is when the mind becomes serene and calm. This state of mind is what Bhagwan refers to as the Nischal Mann (still mind). The meditator then enjoys peace and bliss.

These vrittis exist during all the three states of consciousness of man – the waking state (jagrit avastha), sleep state (nidra avastha) and dream state (svapna avastha). It cannot appear in the fourth state of consciousness – the turiya avastha, which is the state of Samadhi or union with the divine consciousness (For more deeper insights about the 4 states of consciousness read verse 10). When these vrittis arise during the dream state (svapna avastha), they cause dreams. Dreams are thus deep suppressed vrittis or the suppressed emotions and feelings and desires that could not manifest for whatever reason in the waking state of the person. Dreams are a great outlet to release such pent up energies. Also, dreams are a good indication to an aware seeker of what kind of vrittis are still stored in one’s deep mind. So, the absence of dreams are a good indication of dissolving or dissolved vrittis and desires of the seeker. That is how Bhagwan relates to, “Similarly, the ones who have destroyed all their desires have destroyed all their modifications (subtle impressions) in the mind and now are not subject to any dreams.”

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 155

Those who do not breathe through the nose, have no desires of any sort. Their breath is purely internal. They concentrate their breath in the ‘Brahmarandhra’ where the Ida and the Pingala meet. They have realized the Great Self; they look upon all things as Self. This is Swarajya (Self-government). What is Swarajya is Jeeva’s true place. The light of life is ‘Prana Vayu’. ‘Prana Vayu’ is the capitol of Swarajya government. Atman is the lord of the Swarajya government. Swarajya is one’s own energy. This energy must be kept under perfect control. What is Swarajya is not a hill; it is not gold. Keeping under control both desire and anger is Swarajya. A man must say what he does and do what he says.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who do not breathe through the nose have no desires. He is referring to the one who has learnt and mastered the art of internal subtle breathing (through the nadis) and thus depending not on the gross breath through the nostrils to the lungs (read more in additional notes). They are the ones who focus their breath through the Ida and Pingala nadis till they reach the Brahmarandhra (For more insights on Brahmarandhra read verse 59 & 69), whereafter all desires get burnt. At this stage, they realise the Great Self (self-realisation) and now look upon all things as the Self (see verse 17, 31 & 44). He refers to this state as Swarajya meaning now being governed by the Self after attaining freedom from the clutches of Maya.  He calls this Swarajya as the true place of the Jeeva (living being). He says that the light of life is the Prana Vayu, referring to the subtle breath and calls Prana Vayu as the capital of the Swarajya Government where Atman (soul) is the Lord of the Swarajya Government. (For deeper insights on Prana Vayu read verse 121). He says Swarajya is one’s own energy (prana shakti) and so it must be kept under perfect control. He then adds that Swarajya is not a hill and neither gold, referring to keeping both anger and desire in control, which is the true state of Swarajya. He says a man must say what he does and do what he says. This statement is repeated for the 4th time in Chidakasha Gita, which stresses on speaking only from one’s experiences and not hearsay and also not being hypocritical (read in previous verses 37, 104 and 118).

Additional Notes

How can one live without breathing from the nose?

This is a great achievement in the Yogi who has perfected the Sushumna breathing, where the Yogi has mastered the art of living on prana. He no longer needs any external nourishment for he is now nourished by the vital force – prana. He no longer depends on external food, water or breath, but his nourishment is received from the prana (read more on this in verse 11). Human beings live more on the gross air breathed through the nostrils in which the respiratory system is involved in utilising the oxygen from the gross air taken in for the sustenance of the physical body. Prana is taken in by the body through many ways – prana is absorbed from the breathed-in air, prana is absorbed from the sunlight falling on body, prana is absorbed from the cooked food, raw food eaten, prana is absorbed from the water drunk, prana is absorbed from the air around. The physical body, even without the awareness of the individual, does its work of absorbing prana largely through the intake of food, water and breath. However, Yogis who are conscious of prana, know to consciously draw it subtly through all the five elements of nature in which prana is richly present. They even master the art of drawing prana through their subtle bodies like the chakra, nadis and koshas. They master the art of Sushumna breathing (For deeper insights read verses 56, 58 & 59). Such Yogis no more need prana from the tedious process involving the physical organs, like the respiratory system’s tedious work of extracting oxygen and prana from the air taken in through respiration, the digestive system’s work of extracting prana from the tedious process of digestion and the other tedious process of the body in managing the whole process, like the excretory system’s tedious process of filtration and excretion of wastes and other such processes that requires so much of energy, effort and time, not to mention the wear and tear of the organs, the result of which is disease. Thus the Yogis who master living directly on prana are free from all dependency of food, water and air and thus with the purified nadis and a well nourished pranic body become free from all desires and tendencies. If they wish, they can even purify the physical body to the extent that the physical body attains immortality, which is very rare but there are enough Rishis and Siddhas known in history to have attained these states, living for thousands of years in one well-preserved physical body. (Read about the Siddha Sri Siva Prabhakar of the last century who lived for 723 years) and many great ones even to the extent of having attained the light body. Light body is when the physical body is kept nourished fully with light (prana) and eventually the whole physical body turns to light. This is known as the ‘light body’ which is not affected by the physical earthly laws like gravitation because it is no more gross and completely subtle. Such masters like Ramalinga Swami, Ma Lalleshwari Saint Tukaram, etc who are known to have turned into light and disappeared with their physical bodies while the others prefer to leave their body behind at will through a process called Jeeva Samadhi.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 156

If you are afraid of water, you cannot cross a river in a boat. If you are afraid of fire, you cannot heat water. Fear must be banished. To accomplish anything worth doing, one must be thoroughly fearless. Mind is the cause of anything we do.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that fear is the biggest obstacle to accomplishment. Just like if one is afraid of water, he has a hard time crossing the river even in a boat or if one is afraid of fire, he has a hard time boiling water over fire, one also has a hard time trying to accomplish anything worth doing in life, if one is full of fear. Hence, Bhagwan says that fear must be banished from the mind because to do anything the mind is needed to accomplish that. A mind clear of fear can achieve things more easily and also much faster.

Additional Notes

What are normal fears and abnormal fears?

The normal fears are known as the rational fears and abnormal fears are known as irrational fears. Humans are fitted with this system of rational fear where fear protects one from harm. The natural rational fears are helpful for human to navigate through life. For example, if you are walking on the road in your own thoughts and a speeding vehicle from behind suddenly honks the horn loudly and you are startled and fear makes you jump aside. The alarming horn sound was heard by the sense organs (ears) that within a micro second sent a signal to the brain and the brain intercepted the sound and perceived an immediate danger and sent signals to the heart, which immediately pumped blood to the feet. That is why your heart raced and without even thinking your legs moved you to safety. This is the work of the sympathetic nervous system which is responsible for the ‘fight’ and flight’ response. The example given here was the ‘flight’ response where your system automatically decides a ‘flight’ from the dangerous situation. Similarly, the automatic ‘fight’ response is when you are confronted suddenly by a barking dog, without thinking your body might pick a stone or pick a stick or fight it with the umbrella that you have in hand. In both cases of flight and fight, fear is a natural response, which is okay.

The fear mentioned in this verse is the irrational fear. Irrational fears are unreal fears or phobia. A phobia is an irrational fear of something that’s unlikely to cause harm. For example, hydrophobia is the fear of water. Acrophobia is an excessive fear of heights and manifests as severe anxiety, in which one is scared of going up to a place of height or even climbing a ladder. Likewise, astraphobia is the fear of thunder and lightning, pyrophobia is the fear of fire, anthropophobia is the fear of people or society, etc. These fears are all irrational which are not threat to one’s wellbeing but is a perceived threat. Such fears and phobias largely affect a large part of the population.

Where do these irrational or abnormal fears come from?

They come from the deep realms of the subconscious mind where they remained stored and concealed. They may not be known to the conscious waking mind and thus logic cannot find the root cause of phobias. Hence, more than knowing where they come from, it is important to know how they got in there in the first place. Whenever an event occurs in life, generally there is a reaction. That reactions creates an subtle impression. The stronger the emotion, the stronger the emotion. This is true for both positive and negative emotions. For example, you are watching a movie in which it is shown that a man is moving on a lonely dark street and someone suddenly comes out of the dark, snatches his belongings, and stabs him to death, and runs off. This scene may have caused certain trauma in your mind and the depth of trauma differs from person to person. So with the intense emotion, a reaction happens in the mind that creates a subtle impression of fear and that gets rooted into the subconscious. The conscious mind might forget it in some time but the impression has sunk into the subconscious. This is the seed of that fear. Maybe after months or even years you may be walking down a lonely dark street and suddenly you would feel anxious without any reason. Your conscious mind would even wonder why are you feeling jittery but for no reason you might go into a panic. This is how anxiety and phobias are created and also well maintained by humans. By living unconsciously with it, you maintain it with you. Hence, the sooner they are released the better.

How can irrational fears be eradicated?

The root causes must be known in order to eradicate such phobias, which happens through deep meditations and keeping an observant attitude towards life events and times when such fears surface. In the current world, there many modalities of uprooting these psychic impression through deep meditations, past life regressions, pratiprasav or jati smaran methods where through meditations the deep recesses of the subconscious are accessed, relived, re-experienced, healed and dissolved. However, there are simpler methods also that can be practiced in daily living and that is mindful living. One practices living in awareness and witnessing these reactions in the mind than giving heed to it. The Chidakasha Gita advices that the Buddhi (intellect) must be sharpened and must always be the king and the mind it’s subordinate. If the mind is allowed to be the king, then it will react and panic and strengthen these fears, but if the Buddhi is made the king and the mind it’s subordinate, then the intellect will be able to discriminate between the real and unreal. When one shifts into awareness, one is moving from mind to intellect. One is moving from Prakruti to Purusha. One is moving from false ‘I’ to real ‘I’. One is moving from maya to truth. One is moving from karta (doer) to drishta (witnesser). One is moving from ignorance to awareness. From this state of awareness when the fear is observed, without opinions, without judgments, it slowly begins to loosen grip and weaken. Eventually the seed of the fear dries up and the fear is dissolved. The Chidakasha Gita explains how realised beings always have their attention on the Buddhi (read verse 145) and so does it speak many times of the importance of sharpening the intellect (Read verses 16, 22, 23, 26, 49, 61, 69, 85, 98, 126, 128, 135, 143, 145 & 146)  when the Buddhi is fully sharpened, one’s consciousness reaches a stage where all distinctions of duality will cease to exist. Fear happens only in duality, when there is something separate from one’s false ‘I’. In the liberated state of nonduality, one will begin seeing oneself in all in oneself (read 121 & 137) and that state comes only after all the separateness dissolves. Separateness creates fear. The false ‘I’ creates fear.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 157

On a mango tree, all fruits do not grow at the same time and ripen at the same time. First, we have the tender fruit; by and by, the fruit ripens. The ripe fruit is eatable. So also, men must be like mangoes. In every respect, we must cultivate peace.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan gives the example of how on a mango tree all fruits neither grow at the same time nor ripen at the same time. Each fruit first passes through the tender stages of growing and gradually ripens. Similarly, all human beings do not evolve at the same time nor do all liberate at the same time. All are at different stages of their spiritual evolution and ripen gradually. Bhagwan says the ripe fruit is eatable and that men also must be like the mangoes, meaning it is only when the fruit is ripe that they can be considered Jnanis (self-realised) and this is the time their wisdom is ‘eatable’ the the others. So, all must be like the mangoes, respecting every mango (human) for whatever stage they are in, knowing that all are heading towards ripening and one day, in this lifetime or future lifetimes, they shall ripen. Understanding this makes one aware that why people do what they do, and it becomes easy to accept everyone the way they are without judgement, forgive others quickly and love everyone unconditionally. Thus, Bhagwan says in the end of this verse that “in every respect, we must cultivate peace.” 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 158

The head is the mango. In it, is the sweet ambrosia. This ambrosia is the essence of the five senses. This ambrosia is the supreme energy in man.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan compares the head of a human to a mango, within which is the sweet ambrosia (nectar). He is referring to the ambrosial nectar that drops from the pineal gland. The pineal gland is situated in the center of the head right behind the center of the eyebrows (for deeper insights into pineal gland and ambrosial nectar read verses 22 & 94). This ambrosia is the essence of the five senses. 

Additional Notes

The greatest secret of immortality

Throughout the ages, gods to humans have been hunting for the elixir – the divine nectar that bestows immortality and history shows a frantic search and research done to find out the mysteries of the hidden elixir. This elixir is produced by one’s own pineal gland but only after one is able to reach the attention and awareness on the pineal gland. For deeper insights on this read verse 22.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 159

A house in which there is no lamp at night has no beauty. Whatever the nature of a house, the house is perishable. What a lamp is to a house, is Jnana to the body. The light is the light of Kundalini. A thing hidden in mire, fetches no value. When it is recovered from mire, all make use of it. If you discover a diamond in mire, you do not throw it away.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a house in which there is no lamp at night, there is no beauty. He is referring the house to a human being and lamp to the Jnana (divine wisdom). If there is no awakened divine wisdom in a human, there is no beauty.  He then says that whatever the nature of the house, the house is perishable. Meaning whatever the nature of the human body – young-old, rich-poor, clean-shabby, healthy-diseased – it will perish one day. What a lamp is to a house, Jnana (divine wisdom) is to the human being. This light in the awakened human is the light of Kundalini. He says that a thing hidden in dirt brings no value until it is found after which everyone makes use of it. It is just like you would not throw away a diamond found in dirt. Similarly, the one who is buried beneath the desires, cravings, inclinations, tendencies is of no real value to anyone, but when one transcends all this and shines his light of Jnana, he becomes useful to all and everyone can benefit. Once one is enlightened he is not discarded.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 160

A (bad) man falls into a well. We should take him up, not allowing him to die. We must not think that a man will always be bad. We must try to correct him.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if a bad person falls into a well, we must save him and not leave him to die there. We must not assume that the person will remain bad forever and hence there must be attempts made to correct him and guide him rightly. Bhagwan is referring to the judgements and condemnations we often make about others or carry opinions about the wrong doer. Noone can be condemned with a certain judgment with certainty because any moment any person can change. By holding a final opinion about someone, we actually lose the opportunity of saving someone and the person loses the opportunity of being saved. Hence, if someone drifts away from the path, he must be guided and helped to retrace back on the path.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 161

If any powder falls into the eye, our attention is turned on the eye. Similarly, if our outer attention is directed inwards, it is called introversion, (internal sight). Ignorance is like a casket of powder. The possessor of a box only knows what is contained in it. Others do not know it. The real wealth is the energy of life. Intelligence is the box. The box is locked after the wealth is stored in it. Locking the box is giving the Manas its proper place in the head. That thing received is the soul in man. Turn your soul to God within yourself; realize internally your own secret. The universe is in you and you are in the universe. The inner man is the ONE in All. He who is ‘there’ and He who is ‘here’ is the ONE and the SAME.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if any powder falls into the eye, our whole attention would immediately turn towards the eye. He refers this to the process of introversion, of turning our outward attention inward, where the eye remains focussed completely outside until it takes some some powder to enter the eye and make the whole focus from outside to within the eye. He says that ignorance is like a while casket of powder. 

He says only the possessor of the box (creator) knows what is inside the box (within creation) and not any other person. The box is locked after the wealth is stored in it. He compares the box to the intellect and compares the real wealth to the energy of life – the Shakti. Locking the box with intellect is like giving the mind its proper place in the head. He has said many times that the intellect must be given the place of a king and the mind must be given the place of the subordinate (read verses 23 & 146). He then says that ‘the thing received in man is the soul’ meaning the human has been infused with the soul, the self, the awareness, and that with this awareness one must turn to the god within and know their own secret. The secret that the Universe is within you and you are within the Universe. (For deeper insights on the microcosm and the macrocosm read verse 138). This is when the revelation happens that the inner being is the being present in all. The one who is outside (within others) and the one who is within are the one and the same.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 162

The supreme light is the universal light. O Mind! Abolish the idea of ‘otherness’. Have the idea of ‘sameness’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the supreme light is the universal light. (also mentioned in verse 18) He calls out to the mind that is the cause of all distinctions, to abolish the idea of otherness or separateness and instead have the idea of sameness or oneness.

Additional Notes

Usually, the Supreme Light and Universal Light are considered to be different. Universal Light is the one light of the Universe. You could compare this Universal Light to the Sun of our Universe that as one source of light illuminates the whole Universe. Everything in the Universe comes under this light. All religions also sprouted from this Universe. All the religions have their own light but the one light that illuminates them is the Universal Light, just like how the sun illuminates all individuals of all religions alike.

Supreme Light is the light of God, the light of the Creation itself.  In the cosmos or creation, there are countless such Universes like ours with countless such suns, but the one illuminator of all the Universes is the Supreme Light (god’s light). Bhagwan thus says there is no difference in the Supreme light and Universal light because it is one and the same, exactly like how He explained in verse 7 & 8 that there is no difference between Parmatma (god) and Jeevatma (individual) and both are one; man is god.

Many religions honour the Supreme as light and even refer to individual soul as light or flame (jyoti) – the true meaning of the song “Jyot se Jyot Jagao”. You can see the word used is “Jyot Jagao” (awaken) and not “jalao” (light up) because the flame of the lamp is lit and not awakened. But this song is referring the light of the Satguru (Master) as the Universal Light. It seeks that the Satguru (Univeral Light) awaken the seeker’s flame with the Master’s flame, meaning light the individual lamp with the Universal lamp. But at the very ground level there is ignorance in humans of not knowing that humans are light, there is non-acceptance that all religions are one universal light, and thus ignorance of not knowing that the universal light is nothing but the supreme light. This ignorance is known as darkness, the opposite of light. This is why the song further goes as – “Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.) Mera antar timir mitao (burn my inner darkness of ignorance), Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.)

…… and so the Vedic prayer:

Asato ma sad gamaya (Lead us from non-being to being)
Tamaso ma jyotir gamaya (Lead us from darkness to light)
Mrityor ma amritam gamaya (Lead us from death to immortality)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 163

“When you were born, you were born with breath. When you leave this world, you leave breath only. This body of earth, you never made it nor can you take it along with you. That which Shiva gave us is the same in all beings, both mobile and immobile. All seeds have the same power in them. The subtle in seeds is one. There is difference in their behaviour only. The delusion of the mind is not permanent but transient. What can be seen and heard is all transient.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In this verse is the continuity of the previous verses that is emphasising on the Oneness of everything and the avoidance of distinctions. Bhagwan says when you were born you arrived into the world with the first gasp of air, with your first breath of prana. When you leave this world also, you leave with the last breath. Nothing after your arrived into this earth did you bring with you and so nothing can you take with you. That which Shiva (Supreme Consciousness) gave to all beings, moving and inert, is the same. All the seeds have the same power in them ,which is hidden in the gross seed. Only the seed can be seen but not the power from the same ONE source. There is difference in their behaviour only. Meaning, characteristics may be different but it is the same prana that is active in them all. Like from different seeds sprout different trees like apple, mango, coconut – their characteristics are different but what grows and sustains them is the same power. Similar is with human beings, each individual is different with different personalities, behaviors, beliefs, temperaments, qualities, etc but the Self in each of them is the same Brahman. It is only the delusions of the mind that keeps each soul separated with different identities. Bhagwan says this delusion of the mind not permanent but transient and that similarly all that be seen and heard is transient and temporary. Brahman is invisible and eternal, that which exists in all beings in the subtle form.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 164

When we call a man ‘pariah’, it is nothing but mental delusion. A piece of cloth goes equally well into the mouth of a ‘pariah’ or ‘brahmin’. A Brahmin does not use even the chunam touched by a pariah. He does not sit on the same mat with a pariah. Someone acts like this; another sees it or hears of it and he blindly imitates it.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan repeats in this verse again that when we call anyone ‘pariah” (untouchable) it is nothing but mental delusion. In the current age, much changes have happened and much of caste system is dissolved but it still continues to exist in the form of various religious discrimination, racial discrimination and other delusions like the superiority and inferiority complex. It could be the complex between a holy and unholy personality too; they are still discriminations. Bhagwan mocks the delusion by saying that a piece of cloth when put into the mouth of an untouchable or a brahmin, it goes into the mouth in the same manner without any special or lowly preferences. He says such is the ignorance that a brahmin refuses to even use the chunam (quicklime used in paan) that was touched by an untouchable nor does he even sit on the same mat with the untouchable. Then, others see this or hear about it and blindly imitates it.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 165

Those who call another a ‘pariah’ are themselves pariahs. Suppose there is a bunch of plantains; from the plantains of the same bunch, we prepare various sorts of eatables. The plantain is a fruit. If it is cut into slices and fried, it is no longer called a plantain. It is called ‘fried slices’, so also, variously named preparations are made from plantains (of the same bunch). In the beginning, there was only one bunch; preparations are manifold. The original form is one only. So also, in all creatures, the sound of Omkar is the one only.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who call others untouchables or inferior are themselves equivalent to untouchable or inferior. He gives an example of bananas. All bananas in the bunch are the same but different dishes or eatables can be made from the same bananas. The name of the eatable changes but the ingredient is the same banana. If the banana is cut into slices and fried it is called with different names (like chips, wafers, french fries, pomsticks, etc) but all these were made from the bananas of the same bunch. In the beginning there was only one bunch but the preparations were manifold. The original form is one only. Similarly, all beings and all creatures are of different forms, characteristics, qualities, names but the sound of Omkar from where all life manifested is ONE only.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 166

There is a station where four railroads meet. One train goes to Calcutta; another to Bombay; a third to Madras; (and a fourth to some other place). They all start from one station and they reach one station only. Similarly is Maya. Maya is born of us and it disappears in us. It is like butter in milk. Butter emanates from milk and it merges in milk. The sayings of a great sage last long. Even if there is none to hear them, they continue to live long.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan gives an example of a railway station where four railroads meet. One train goes towards Kolkata, another goes towards Mumbai, another to Chennai (another probably towards Goa). They all start from one station and spread out in different directions and they all return back to the same station. Similarly, maya (illusion) is also born from us and it disappears in us itself like butter in the milk that manifests out of milk and merges in milk. The sayings or the words from a great sage continue to survive and thrive for long even if there is none to hear them. (see more on this in additional notes).

Additional Notes

“Even if there is none to hear them, they continue to live long.” What does this mean?

The words of great sages are not like the words of a common man. There are infused with divinity since they come from not the ego consciousness but the supreme consciousness of the great sage. This is because their ego has merged in the supreme consciousness and what fills them is nothing but that infinite. What flows through them is the divine nectar of the highest or in other words can be mentioned as god’s words. What they speak is nothing from individual consciousness, nothing from the limited mind, but now they speak from the cosmic mind, cosmic consciousness. Their words are like high voltage electricity packed in small battery of words. Most sages and saints like Tirumoolar, Tiruvalluvar, Agasthyar, Samarth Ramdas, Tulsidas, Mirabai, Ma Lalleshwari, Akkamahadevi, Kalidas, Adi Shankaracharya, Vyasa, Namdev, Surdas, Jnyaneshwar, Basavanna, Rumi, Kabirdas, Aurobindo and countless others leave these high-powered batteries in their short poems or songs. These songs, sonnets, poems or verses mostly contained lines of poetic or expressions that would not unwind to a reader reading it without consciousness for they needed more than just a curiosity in readers. These were not to be read but meditated upon and unless that was done, it was impossible to relate even closely with what the great ones had intended to be transferred via their previous words. Most of the time this was deliberate for they wished not their divine secrets reach ‘wrong’ hands. So poetic expressions remained their most favourite coded language to preserve the divine wisdom for the ‘ready’ ones or who would make the only use that the intent of the divine one was. They spoke less but their words contained measureless wisdom. Like the sacred text of Tirumandiram, for example, was written by the great Sage Tirumoolar, who is said to have lived for 3000 years. He always was in silence, meditating on a hill in Tamilnadu all throughout the year, and only once in a year, he would come down and write one verse that contained all what he had received throughout the year! So the wisdom coded into that one verse would be like measureless terabytes of data being stored in a small pendrive. He wrote 3000 verses which all contain the mysteries of human life and secrets of working the way out to liberation and the mystical byproducts of the path. Comprehending the actual details of the verses is impossible with casual reading. Quite similar and many the work of many other Sages. Not just written texts, but the words of the great Mystics also was difficult to comprehend by the people who lived in their era. Most of the time the words of the Mystics were misinterpreted, misunderstood or never understood in its entirety, which is what made many even rebel against them to the extent of even harming them. For many others the words of the Mystics were quite challenging to their comfort beliefs and conditioning and hence their words were chosen to be ignored. Even if their words were ignored, the power and truth in the words managed to be preserved for generations and blossom widely in the masses even generations after they had left their bodies. Such was the potent power of their words. This is what Bhagwan is referring to in this verse when he says, “Even if there is none to hear them, they continue to live long.”

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 167

There was a bare plain; there a traveller’s bungalow was erected. Scarcely two days had passed, a meeting was held there. Chunam was used to cement the stones. The walls were all white washed. On the very day of white washing, a meeting was held. A certain coolie was appointed to warn the people, attending the meeting, lest their feet and bodies be besmeared with the chunam. The meeting was over and all the people dispersed. But the coolie stayed behind. Afterwards, many a meeting was held in the bungalow. There was nobody in the bungalow to tell the coolie, “You were engaged with a certain salary a month; now take your salary up today and go away. From tomorrow, your services are not required.” Yet the coolie continues to do his duty. So is a Jnyani in the midst of worldly people. There are many people in this world who behave like the people in this bungalow. They are ignorant of the subtle. They are ignorant of what karma is. Hence the comparison of the world to this bungalow.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan narrates an example to demonstrate the work of the liberated ones in this world of maya (illusion). He says that there was an empty bare land upon which a traveller’s bungalow (inn) was built. Hardly two days had passed, a meeting was held by the people who built it. Chunam (wall plaster paint made of quicklime and sand) was used to cement the stones and also all the walls were whitewashed. The meeting was held on the very same day that the whitewashing happened.  Since the chunam was still fresh a certain coolie (unskilled laborer) was appointed to stay guard at the place and warn the people coming there so that they don’t get smeared with the paint. But it so happened that even after meeting was over and all the people had dispersed, the coolie remained there itself doing his duty. After that many meetings were held there, the chunam had all dried up, but the coolie continued doing the same work of warning people about the chunam. There was noone in the bungalow to tell the coolie that his work was over and that he could take his salary and leave as his services were no longer needed now. The coolie continued doing his work. Now, Bhagwan beautifully compares this coolie to a liberated being (Jyani) and the bungalow to the materialistic world. He compares the chunam to the karma that can stick on people as they engage themselves in maya. He compares the people coming to attend the meeting as the people of this world. He says that like these people who are ignorant of the chunam, the people of the world also are ignorant of karma and ignorant of the subtle. Meeting after meetings they come back to the bungalow and don’t even relieve the coolie as they are so engrossed in their meetings. Meaning, lifetime after lifetime people keep coming back to earth and continue living ignorantly, never becoming aware of the chunam themselves and neither becoming aware of the liberated being’s work. They do not even think of relieving the coolie, means one does not take responsibility of becoming aware of karma and maya and ignorantly continue relying on the liberated being to protect them and serve them. Noone is bothered to tell the coolie to take his salary and leave. Similarly liberated beings work without any benefit for the world and yet their presence is never acknowledged nor are they valued. But like how the coolie continues to work saving people from chunam, the liberated beings also continues to work selflessly in this world in saving the ignorant from the karma/maya. They forgot that the coolie was hired only for the start. Similarly, people forget even after taking initial help and guidance from the liberated ones and continue being lodged in the worldly activities, thus compelling the liberated ones to keep doing their work.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 168

In a similar way, you must understand all matters. One is standing still. Another is working. All are imitating one another. They are ignorant of both justice and injustice. After knowing justice, they will not stoop to injustice. For a just man, it is very difficult to do injustice. Such a man will never tell a lie, even though his tongue were to be torn asunder. An unjust man wants everything. A just man wants nothing. He is not afraid of anyone. The whole world is in him. The minds of the unjust people are in the world. It is the duty of every human being to know what is justice and what is injustice.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content

This is in continuation to Bhagwan’s words in the previous verse where he compared the ignorant being born again and again, every time failing to recognise the subtle, due to the worldly entanglements. In this verse he continues saying that this is the way you must understand matters. He says all are blindly imitating each other, being ignorant about justice (what is just, righteous) and what is injustice (what is unjust, immoral). This happens when the Buddhi is not discriminating with what is real and what is unreal, what is right and what is wrong, what is just and what is unjust. So, without following one’s own Buddhi or conscience, all are blindly imitating each other. He says that once one realises the truth he knows what is justice and the one who knows what is justice will not stoop to any injustice. For such a just man, it is impossible to do anything that is unjust. Such a man will never tell a lie even if his tongue was  to be torn apart. A just man wants nothing and is content but an unjust man will want everything. A just man is never afraid of anyone as all distinctions of duality no more exist in him and everything is one. He is not afraid of anyone because he has realised now that the whole world is in him, whereas the mind of the unjust is fully in the world. Bhagwan concludes stating that it is the duty of every human being to purify the Buddhi completely by which it shows what is right and what is wrong, what is justice and what is injustice.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 169

Rivers and streamlets enter into the sea and there become one. Similarly, finite things become one in the infinite. Dualism loses itself in monism. Monism is oneness. This realization of the oneness is the most supreme.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that rivers and streamlets enter into the sea and there become one. Similarly, all finite things become one in the finite. Duality loses itself in monism (nonduality). Monism is Oneness. This realisation of Oneness is the most Supreme.

Additional Notes

All religions and paths are rivers and streamlets that all end into the sea of Oneness. Everything was born from Oneness and everything merges back into Oneness. All the countless separate things seen in this world have all come from that Oneness and will eventually merge back into Oneness. This is a vicious cycle that keeps looping. This whole process is known as the play of consciousness. Each soul experiences a different reality in this play of consciousness depending on the cause and effect (see more on this in verse 31) and remains affected by the duality until it chooses to evolve out of the play. It happens with the realisation that we are all from the same Source. This realisation in experience is called self-realisation. The Chidakasha Gita keeps pointing again and again to this realisation.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 170

After a man has realized the ‘oneness’, he will no longer be born. Those who are immovably fixed in the idea of ‘oneness’ die only when they desire to die. Such men are perfectly desireless. Realization of ‘oneness’ is the most ‘subtle one’. What is the ‘samesightedness’ (the indivisible sight) is realizing the Atman in all. This equality consists in realizing the ‘one’ in the ‘many’. This is known as introspection. When the next world and this world are realized as one and the same, a man has attained ‘same-sightedness’. This is also called the union of Jeevatma and the Paramatma.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that after a man has realized this Oneness, that the Chidakasha Gita has been talking for sometime now, he will no longer be born again for he is now off the cycle of birth and death. He says those who are immovably fixed in the idea of Oneness (self-realised), die only when they desire to die. Such men are perfectly desireless, and having attained mastery over life, they choose when to leave. (For deeper insights into how a realised being is able to choose to leave their body at  will, see verse 59 & 155). Bhagwan says that the realisation of Oneness is the most subtle one and the highest experience. The ‘same-sightedness’ that he is referring to is the state of equality, of seeing one in the many, of seeing the Atman in all. He says that man has attained same-sightedness or Oneness, when he realises that the next world and this world are one and the same, meaning that for him the after-life lokas or dimensions are not different from the earth plane that he is physically embodied in. For this self-realised man everything is One;  there is nowhere to come from and there is nowhere to go; he is Omnipresent. This state has been many times referred to by Bhagwan in the Chidakasha Gita as the union of Jeevatman and Parmatman (For deeper insights on this read verses 7, 8, 10, 57 & 149).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 172

All is He, pervading everything. He is the ‘One’, pervading all creatures; quality-less; the one Omkar; one, whose form is everlasting peace; blesser of those who have faith in Him. The same being punishes those who ridicule His devotees. He makes the death of His devotees easy. O Shiva! Do not lead me towards hell but lead me towards you. The giver is Shiva.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that everything is the all-pervading Lord, the Supreme Consciousness called as Shiva. He is in everything and everything is in Him. He is the ONE pervading all creatures and is quality-less (nirguna), the one Omkar, the one whose form is everlasting peace. He blesses those who have faith in Him and punishes those who ridicule His devotees. Meaning, all those who are aligned with the Supreme consciousness are blessed with the grace of the Supreme and all those who ridicule or trouble the ones aligned with him are punished by the Supreme. He makes the death of His devotees easy, meaning the transition of leaving the physical body is easier for those who are aligned with the Supreme. Bhagwan calls out to the Supreme “O Shiva! Do not lead me towards hell but lead me towards you.” The one who gives is Shiva, the Supreme consciousness.

Additional Notes

The 3 Gunas and beyond

Guna means tattva or a quality or an element or an attribute or a virtue. The gunas are present in every human which are primarily responsible for one’s traits, actions and modes of behaviors and they greatly influence the life of every human. The 3 gunas are: 1. Sattva 2. Rajas 3. Tamas

The gunas are born from Prakriti (nature). The Self (individual soul) does not reside in the gunas but the gunas reside in the Self. Before creation,  the gunas remain inactive and in a state of perfect balance in the Moola Prakriti (Primordial Nature). When their balance is disturbed, creation gets set into motion, and the beings comes into existence, each possessing the 3 gunas in different proportions. The gunas are responsible for the duality or diversity of nature, and this gives birth to reality and unreality (maya). When the gunas are manifested in creation, the individual souls come under their influence and begin their outward journey into the world of matter and death.

The beings having more of sattva belong to the higher worlds. Beings having more of tamas belong to the lower worlds, and those with predominance of rajas belong to the middle worlds. In humans, all the three gunas are present in different degrees according to their spiritual purity and progress. Those with qualities of hate, crime, and other lowly animalistic or evil tendencies possess the predominance of tamas. Those pious people abiding by dharma (righteousness)  possess the predominance of sattva and the worldly people who are driven by selfish desires possess the predominance of rajas.

Actually, no gunas are good or bad and they are just the 3 qualities needed for a dual world and they are all fine when each guna is in balanced quantity. Every human is every moment affected by the 3 gunas and they can keep fluctuating in their quality of life depending on what they do become aware and act to bring changes in the qualities of the gunas. For example when you feel lazy, dull, inert, or grounded it is tamas; when you feel energetic, rushed, all-over-the-place, or full of attachment it is rajas; when you feel serene, calm, and balanced it is sattva.

The qualities of the 3 gunas:

Tamas: Increases with tamasic foods like meat, chemically-treated, processed, refined, junk food, fast food, bakery food,  overnight food, meat, alcohol, tobacco, fermented foods such as vinegar and stale overripe substances, etc. Other tamasic qualities are laziness, disgust, attachment, depression, helplessness, doubt, guilt, shame, boredom, addiction, hurt, sadness, apathy, confusion, grief, dependency, ignorance.

Rajas: Increases with rajasic foods like fried, spicy, very hot, bitter, sour, dry, salty, sharp spices or strong herbs, onions and garlic, stimulants such as coffee and teas, fish, poultry, eggs, salt, chocolate, etc. Other rajasic qualities are , over-exercising, overwork, loud music, excessive thinking, use of excessive material goods.

Sattva: Increases with reduction of rajas and tamas qualities and with consumption of sattvic foods like grains, legumes, cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables, pure fruit juices, milk, butter and cheese, nuts, seeds, honey, herb teas, etc. Other satvic qualities are yoga, meditation, being in activities and environments that produce joy, positive and divine thoughts.

Guna-athitha: The path of spirituality is all about transcending these gunas. Normally, one begins by moving or making choices towards more of the sattva qualities and reducing the qualities of rajas and tamas. Thus, a Yogi moves towards the pure qualities of sattva. But, it is important to understand that even thought sattva is pure, it is still a quality and can still keep a soul bound in the cycle of birth and death. To get liberated from the cycle of birth and death (moksha) one has to transcend all the 3 gunas, which is a state called as guna-atitah).

An Avadhoota is the best example of a human embodiment who has transcended all gunas. When one overcomes the 3 gunas, he has no affinity towards likes nor dislikes, purity or impurity, passion or sainthood. It makes no difference to him even if they present or absent. He neither looks forward to anything nor detests anything. He thus remains indifferent to pleasure and pain, pleasant and unpleasant, criticism or praise, honor or dishonor, friend or enemy, gold or clay. He does not show any favour on any particular quality or person or thing nor is against anything in existence. He just is a pure witness, the observer, infinite, for he has now become one with the Supreme Creator, even while embodying a human body. This state beyond the 3 gunas is referred as Nirguna (attributeless). Shiva consciousness is referred to as Nirguna (quality-less) Nirakar (formless). The Avadhoot is nirguna but still has a form (aakar). The moment he drops his body, he becomes the Nirguna, Nirakar. So it is like God residing in a human form. That is why Bhagwan Nithyananda is referred to as Bhagwan (god) pr Parabrahma (Supreme).

The Saguna & Nirguna Shiva

The Supreme Creator is referred to as Shiva, who is with and without a form. Advaita (nonduality) is formless and Dvaita (duality) is form. The formless supreme consciousness is referred to as Nirguna Nirakar Shiva (Nirguna means quality-less and Nirakar means formless). In Advaita Vedanta the same is referred to as Parabrahman.

The one with form is referred to as Saguna and one without form (formless) is referred to as Nirguna. The best example for Saguna is the sun and sunlight is the nirguna form of the sun. The subtle, invisible, formless supreme consciousness is the NIrguna form of Shiva. The physical form (Saguna) of Shiva Consciousness is the Shiva with the Jata (matted hair).

Form (saguna roop) is necessary for one to reach the nirguna (formless). All our practices begin with Saguna bhakti and gradually transcends to Nirguna bhakti. Bhakti is love/devotion. It is difficult for one to directly meditate on the formless in the start. So a form is needed. It can be any form – an idol, an image, a physical form (Guru/Mystics).   

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 173

“A dead thing is without motion; it is soundless. A living thing has the delusion of sound; it has ‘consciousness’. Conscious creatures have impressions and movements. Creatures, conscious of sound, have the delusion of sound. They have the light of Brahma in them. Consciousness of creatures is light. Men know the distinction between justice and injustice. Lower animals have no distinction of such a sort. Man stands at the head of all creation. There is nothing impossible for man in this world. Man is in the universe and the universe is in man. Man is the greatest of animals. Mind in man is fickle. In man, both this world and the next, merge. Shiva Loka is the third (divine) eye. The Shiva nerve is the Sushumna nerve, also called the Brahma nerve. The lord of Shiva-Loka is nothing but Shiva Shakti. What is Maya is in Shiva. Shiva is not in Maya. Creation and destruction are both Maya caused by Him. In the Great Self, everything becomes latent-effect, soul, Manas, Brahma, waking consciousness, Taraka, sleep, extreme ignorance, and the whole of the external world.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In this verse Bhagwan is speaking of the special ability of man to think, decide and make choices, which is absent in all other living beings. Only man has been blessed with this special gift to think and gifted with intellect so as to discriminate between right and wrong. Bhagwan says that a dead thing is motionless and soundless because it is inert (stone/chair, etc) but a conscious living creatures have impressions and movements and can perceive sound because it has consciousness. They have the light of Brahma (Supreme) and this consciousness is the light. But then, he is referring to man as the highest among all living creatures, because men know the distinction between justice (right) and injustice (wrong), which is absent in the lower creature like animals, reptiles, insects, etc. He says that man stands as the head of creation, because man has the ability to think and create and thus nothing is impossible for man in this world. Man is in the Universe and Universe is in man (for deeper insights into this read verse 138).   He calls man as the greatest of all animals, whose mind is fickle, but still it is only in man that this world and the next world can merge (to know what is ‘this world and next world’ read verse 57).

He says Shivaloka is the third eye (agna chakra). Here he reveals that the Lord of Shivaloka is nothing but Shiva Shakti, that is, the indivisable Shakti of Parabrahma (see verse 149). The Shiva nerve is also called the Brahma nerve or Brahma Nadi (for more insights into Brahma Nadi read verse 53 & 112). It is throiugh this nerve that the consciousness enters the next world, Shivaloka.

What is maya is in Shiva but Shiva is not in maya (for more insights see verse 118). Creation and destruction are both maya created by Shiva. Everything external lies latent (concealed) in  the Great Self (Shiva or God consciousness)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 174

“To probe into truth, requires subtle discrimination. This subtle discrimination is Upadhi. The subtle is hidden in the gross. The seat of Upadhi is the heart space. When the Kundalini is raised to the heart space in the head, then, the breath is single. In this highest state, one sees the universe in one’s Self. Then one sees everything in Him. All the multitudinous changes are seen in oneself. Feeling of duality is hell; feeling of absolute oneness is Mukti. Absolute Bhakti (love) is Mukti. Perfect peace, never perturbed peace, is the goal of man. This is Yogananda; Paramananda. The ocean is bigger than all the rivers. The sea is almost boundless. You cannot measure the water of the ocean. It is not possible to practice Bhakti, leaving off Samsara. Being in Samsara, we must attain Mukti by being ‘this thing’ and by doing ‘that thing’. What is desire is Samsara. Desirelessness is Mukti. Then, one will enjoy eternal bliss, eternal wisdom bliss. Eternal peace which is the highest bliss, is the goal of man. When the mind is swimming in eternal bliss, it is known as Mukti. Bhakti is the state of eternal bliss.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that to probe subtle discrimination (by the buddhi) is required to probe into the truth. This state of being able to discriminate the real from the unreal is upadhi (read verse 77 on upadhi). The subtle is hidden in the gross (head). The place of this upadhi is in the heart space (Chidakasha). When the Kundalini shakti is raised through the sushumna from the lower chakras to the heart space in the head (agya chakra), the breath (prana) becomes single. This is explained in Kundalini Yoga – ordinarily the prana alternates between the Ida and Pingala Nadis, but when the prana is raised to the agya chakra, Kevala Kumbhaka happens and the Yogi enters into samadhi. During Kevala Kumbhaka the physical breath stops and even the prana in the Ida and Pingala nadis is restrained, only the prana in the Sushumna is active. This is what Bhagwan refers to as “breath becomes single” (for details on “Kevala Kumbhaka” read the insights in verse 121). In this highest state of Samadhi, one sees the Universe in one’s Self and everything is seen within. All the multitude changes are seen within.

Bhagwn says feeling of duality is hell and feeling of absolute oneness is mukti (liberation). Absolute bhakti is mukti. Absolute bhakti means Universal love (explained in verse 44). This is what is the goal of man, the state of perfect absolute peace. This state is Yogananda and Paramananda, which is like the ocean that is bigger than all rivers, that is boundless, which cannot be measured.

Bhagwan says it is not possible to practice bhakti (universal love) by leaving off Samsara. Being in Samsara we must attain mukti by ‘being this thing’ and ‘doing that thing’. ‘Being this thing’ means playing our roles as being a father, daughter, spouse, child, teacher, leader, servant, etc. ‘Doing that thing’ means playing our respective roles in life and by fulfilling our responsibilities. This is called Samsara. He says samsara means desires and achieving the state of desirelessness is mukti. Meaning, by being in Samsara and fulfilling the desires and responsibilities and transcending them is moving towards becoming desireless and achieving liberation. Then one will enjoy the eternal bliss and the bliss of the eternal wisdom in this mukti. In this state the mind dissolves (no desires is no mind) and when the mind swims in this eternal bliss, it is known as mukti. Bhakti (universal love through oneness) is the result and bhakti thus brings in the state of eternal bliss.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 175

God is in bliss. In God, is bliss. That is the nectar of wisdom. In that nectar, is joy. When we approach that nectar, we experience joy.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

In continuity to the previous verse, Bhagwan is referring to the eternal state of bliss achieved through liberation when one reaches the state of desirelessness and experiences unconditional universal love (bhakti). This is the state of God-realisation. This state eternal bliss is being referred by Bhagwan as God. He thus says that God is in bliss and in God is bliss. That bliss is the nectar of wisdom (gyan) and the one who achieves this nectar of wisdom is known as a Gyani, who is what the Chidakasha Gita begins talking about (see verse 1). In that divine nectar is real joy, which is experienced when we approach that divine nectar. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 176

The goal of man is Upanayanam, i.e., ‘to be lead’ to immortality. Dwelling in the cave of the heart is man’s goal. Living in the cave means ‘living inside the body’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the goal of human birth is Upanayanam. Upanayanam is a Sanskrit word that literally means ‘the act of leading to or enlightenment or near the eye’. ‘Upa’ means upwards and “nayan” means eye. He has also referred to Upanayan in verse 116. So Bhagwan mentions that Upanayanam is the goal of man, meaning to be lead to immortality. He says that dwelling in the cave of the heart is man’s goal. Then he says that living in the cave means living inside the body. He is referring to the body as the cave and this has been mentioned in verse 62 also. Basically this verse points towards the ultimate human goal of life – to shift from the body consciousness to soul consciousness, raising the consciousness to the third eye (upanayan) and attaining immortality (self-realisation).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 177

Meditate incessantly on the Paramatma who is in the Jeevatma. Space is in you; it is in the head. Meditate on the heart space which is in the head.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan asks to meditate without interruption on the Paramatma (God) who is within the Jeevatma (human being). He points out to the sacred space (Chidakasha)  that is in the head. He asks that one must meditate on this hearts space which is in the head (space of the third eye).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 178

Those who are born deaf have not the least idea of sound. They have no desires. They have subtle discrimination. Those who are always in yoga sleep, have no difference between day and night, between sun and moon. To the subtle discrimination, all is one. Those who have annihilated the mind, are men. Lower animals are so called, because they are in a lower stage of development. Sensual life is beastly life. The upward breath is the goal of man. The same is Gayatri, accomplished; the same is yoga-bliss.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who are born deaf have the least idea of sound. He is referring this with the Jyanis (self-realised) who are deaf to sound (external stimulus). None of the stimulus form the 5 senses (eyes, ears, touch, smell, taste) are able to affect them in any way, because they are “dead” to it. Such have no desires because all vasanas (tendencies) in them are burnt out. But they have subtle discrimination. Subtle discrimination is witnesshood or awareness. (Read more on subtle discrimination in verses 126, 149 & 174). Such  have high states of awareness. He says that such ones are those who are always in yoga sleep (yog nidra) or the state of samadhi, and such ones cannot discriminate between day and night or sun and moon, because all dualities in them have perished. To the subtle discrimination (awareness), all is One. He says that those who have annihilated (destroyed) the mind are real men (conscious humans). Rest he compares with the state of animals because the animal kingdom is in a lower state of development and the basic animalistic tendencies are food, sex and survival. Thus he says sensual life is beastly life. He reminds that the real goal of human life is upward breath. Upward breath is the upward raising of prana. When prana flows downwards it wastes in the creation and enjoyment of materialistic and sensual pleasures. Hence, the Yogis raise the prana up towards the higher chakras up until the Agya chakra. This process has been mentioned by Bhagwan many times in this Chidakasha Gita (see verses 11, 120, 121, 140, & 143).  He then says that the bliss of this upward breath, is the same bliss of accomplished Gayatri (self-realisation) and same bliss of Yoga (Yoga means merging of Individual Consciousness to Universal Consciousness).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 179

One who has annihilated the manas is the universal teacher. One who has destroyed desire, root and branch, is the teacher of all.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who has annihilated the mind is the universal teacher (Sadguru) because it is he who has completely destroyed desire, the root and branches of desire. The Chidakasha begins with “Jyanis are mindless…” and it continuously speaks about destroying the mind. (To know more about what is destroying the mind read verse 1). More emphasis on this is in the next verse (180).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 180

He is a real Sanyasi who has burnt desire to ashes. He is the universal teacher. The universe is in those who have renounced desire. What is Akash (space) is Sanyasa. The same is light; the same is consciousness. The same is divine light. The same is fire, internal, and external. The same is the fire of discrimination. This power of discrimination is in the universe.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the Universal Teacher (Sadguru) is the Sanyasi who has burnt desire to ashes. In such a one, there are no desires left for the universe is in those who have renounced desire. Meaning, what can a Sanyasi need from outside that he himself does not possess. The Akasha (Chidakasha or heart space) is Sanyasa. The same Sanyasa is the light, the same Sanyasa is the consciousness, the same Sanyas is divine light. The same Sanyasa is both the internal and external fire. External fire is the fire element of nature and the gross fire that burns. Internal fire is being referred to the ‘fire of wisdom’ – the spiritual fire within. For more on fire read verses 4, 16, 32, 70, 98, 121, 122, 129, 122, 129 & 141).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse:

181

Fire is essentially an internal thing. Fire is the supreme of all. The origin of all creation is fire. First, we must realize ourselves and then, impart it to others. This is the highest duty of man. When you feel pain, you must realize that others have pain just like you. When you feel hungry, you must realize that others have hunger just like you. We must think that what is our goal is also the goal of others. When a physician develops a new medicine and he does not reveal it to others till his death, the medicine is lost to the world with him. One who does not know the ways and means to realize God, is not a man. The most supreme knowledge is the knowledge of God. This knowledge must be imparted to others so that they may understand it. Those who are hungry must be fed. Nobody asks you about God unless he has discriminative power.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

When Bhagwan says that fire is an internal thing, he is referring to the fire of the Kundalini shakti, which then ignites the fire of subtle wisdom. In the Chidakasha Gita, he has referred fire to both Kundalini shakti (verse 98) and wisdom churned by the fire of discrimination of the intellect (verse 32, 70, 121, 122, 129, 141 & 180). He says that the fire is the supreme of all and that it is the origin of all creation. Here he is referring to the Source as fire, which has been deeply explained in verse 122, where he mentions of fire of Omkar, the Source.

Bhagwan says first one must realise the ultimate truth themselves and then impart the divine wisdom to others. He calls this as the highest duty of man. When one feels pain, one must realise that others also feel pain just like him. When one feels hungry, one must know that others also feel hungry just like him. That is when one will realise that what is his goal is the goal of others too. Bhagwan mentions how important it is for the one who has realised the truth to impart it to help others. If not, he says, it would be just like a physician who developed a new medicine and died without sharing it with anyone, thus helping noone, because the secret of the medicine is gone with him. He says one who does not know the means and ways to realise God is not a man. So, the highest wisdom which is the wisdom of God, must be imparted to those who do not know the means to realise God so that they can understand it and utilise the wisdom to attain liberation. So he says that those who are hungry for this wisdom must be fed, because nobody can ask or seek this wisdom unless they have discriminative powers. Discriminative powers means the ability to discern what is right and wrong, the ability to differentiate between what is real and unreal. In verse 70, Bhagwan mentions how the one who has discriminative powers must be initiated and granted the wisdom.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 182

“The first requirement is faith. The second is devotion (Bhakti). Those who have no faith cannot have devotion. The judge listens to what the defendants say. Faith is just like that. When Buddhi (understanding) has attained acute discriminating power, we will experience Vivekananda. Vivekananda is Paramananda; Satchidananda. When existence (Sat) and knowledge (Chit) become one, Ananda will result. This is Brahmananda; Shivananda.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Continuing from the previous verse where Bhagwan said that all those who yearn for spiritual wisdom must be given it, in this verse he says that for this the first requirement is faith. The second requirement is bhakti (devotion). It is not possible to have faith without devotion. In similar faith, the judge listens to what the defendants have to say, while the judge is discriminating between the right and wrong. In previous verse Bhagwan says that the one who has such discriminative powers with faith is the one ready to receive the divine wisdom. He then says that when Buddhi has attained acute discriminative powers, he experiences Vivekananda (bliss of a ripened Buddhi, which is but a discriminating faculty. This Vivekananda is nothing different from Paramananda and Satchidananda (to know more about Parmananda and Satchidananda read verses 53, 69, 102, 112, 12, & 174). When existence and knowledge merge and become one, Ananda (bliss) is the result, which is Bramhananda… Shivananda… (also see verses 53, 56, 72 ,102, 112 & 122)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 187

What the nest is to the bird, is the body to the soul. The body is the house of the soul. What is “that house” and what is “this house” is subtle discrimination. The gross body is the beggarly house. What to say of Brahmananda! No one can describe it. Truly, truly, realize that the eternal Atman is ONE in ALL. Hari is not the knower; Shiva is the knower. What is Hari is wandering. “Hari! Hari! I want this”; “I want that” “Give me, give me” you say. This is of no use. Such a man is never happy. Let Hari merge in Hara. Burn Hari in Hara. Saying “Hari, Hari” is nothing but mental delusion. You praise Hara, hiding this delusion in your mind! He who has given you eternal joy is Shiva. Shiva is the giver of eternal Mukti (liberation) and eternal Bhakti. What is Hari is keeping the mind in the world. Shiva is keeping the whole universe in one’s Self. Saying “Hari, Hari” is going down. But Shiva is the guide to the path of bliss. Mukti is obtained by the upward course of Prana. Hari is like a horse without reins.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan compares the bird in a nest to the soul in the body. The body becomes the house in which the soul resides. He says that it is only subtle discrimination (viveka) of the intellect (buddhi) that will reveal what is real and what is unreal.  Subtle discrimination is the knowing of what is ‘that house’ (the real abode of the soul –  the heart space or Chidakasha) and what is ‘this house’ (the temporary abode within the human body). He calls the gross body as the beggarly house and exclaims that noone can describe the blissful state of  Brahmananda in the real house (abode of Parmatman)! He exclaims that truly one must realise that the eternal Atman (soul) is ONE in all.

He then says that Hari is not the knower but Shiva is the knower. Before proceeding further, it must be known that he is not comparing two forms of god that normally two sects of religion follow as Shivites and Vaishnavites. He is talking more of the subtle aspects of the two forms – Shiva (Hara) and Vishnu (Hari). He says thus that Shiva (Hara) is the knower, the experiencer, the witness, the Supreme, the Purusha. Whereas, Vishnu (Hari) is the prakriti, the maya, the creation that has emerged out of Shiva. Creation (Vishnu) cannot be alive without consciousness (Shiva).  To known in depth about what Hara (Shiva) and Hari (Vishnu) signifies, please read verses 118, 127 & 128).

He thus says that what is Hari is wandering, because it is then all about hankering behind the desires in this creation (world). He says that “Hari, Hari…” is then all about “I want this” “I want that” “Give me, give me”. It is all about the unending wants and desires and thus he calls it as wandering in this world and that this is of no use. It is all about being constantly stuck in desires like house, wealth, vehicle, materials, spouse, children, etc. He thus says that such a man is never happy. He says thus to burn Hari in Hara and merging Hari in Hara. He says saying “Hari Hari” is nothing but mental delusion, because it comes from the hidden desires of seeking happiness from things of this unreal impermanent world (Hari). He says to rather hide this mental delusion by praising or calling out to Hara (Shiva) which is the real and everlasting Source. The one who can give you the eternal joy is thus Shiva. Shiva grants eternal liberation (mukti) and eternal bhakti (unconditional love to all without any distinction). He says Hari means keeping one’s mind constantly in the world (samsara), but Shiva means keeping the whole Universe within one’s Self.  Constantly striving “Hari Hari” is going downwards but Shiva is the guide to the upward path to bliss. Liberation (mukti) is obtained by the upward course of the Prana (Kundalini Shakti). Hari is like a horse without reins, meaning a mind that is let loose without any control into the worldly lures. (For more deeper insights into the “upward course of breath/prana read verses 59, 120, 121, 140, 143, & 178)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 188

“To ride a horse safely in the midst of a crowd of two thousand people, the rider must be efficient. Buddhi (intellect) is above; Manas (mind) is below. Buddhi is the king; Manas is the prime minister, mind must be subordinate to Buddhi. The first is sound; the second is the impression which the sound carries. The primary guru is the Manas; the secondary preceptor is he who initiates you. The secondary guru is the teacher. The primary guru is that which practices. Realization is the primary guru. You cannot have a secondary preceptor unless you have a desire to have him. When you have the desire to possess a thing you require a secondary guru. The secondary guru is he who shows you the well. The primary guru is he who drinks water from the well. The primary preceptor banishes the darkness in you, giving you light. Darkness is ignorance; light is knowledge. He who shows you the path to the subtle, leaving aside the gross, is the guru. The one guru who is in all is the Lord of the Universe. One is not the guru to the other. One is only a secondary guru. Guru is the Lord of the Universe. He is the Omkar, Brahma, Vishnu, Maheshwara, the origin of Para-Brahma. Vishnu is the mental modifications (Vrittis). What is Shiva is the decoration of the body. Brahmeshwara is leaving aside of the body idea, like the kernel of a dry coconut which is separated from the outer covering.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

This verse is seemingly is repetition of many important verses said before by Bhagwan in the Chidakasha Gita. Below is the breakup of the entire verse.

Bhagwan says that only an efficient horse-rider can ride a horse amidst 2000 people.
Horse refers to the individual and people refers to the crowded thoughts and desires in the mind. Only the one with a purified intellect is efficient enough to navigate through the catches of thoughts and the lures of desires. Such a person can navigate in this world of maya without being affected by it (read verse 24). How is what is explained in the continued verse. 

The intellect is above and the mind is below. Intellect is the prime minister and mind must be its subordinate. The first is sound and the second is the impression which carries the sound.
Normally, in a person who has not awakened, the mind always dominates the intellect (buddhi). A dull intellect cannot discriminate between what is right and wrong, what is real and unreal, hence the mind will randomly make its choices based on its most dominant tendencies (vasanas). Bhagwan reminds the true position of the intellect and mind. Intellect, he says, must be above, like the prime minister. Mind must be below, like the subordinate. Like the sound and its wave of vibrations that follow, the intellect must be like the sound and mind the carrier of that waves of that sound. Whatever the quality of the intellect, the waves of that same impressions will ripple in the mind. For example, if a negative thought arises in the mind, a poor intellect will be unable to discriminate how valid that thought is, and thus the negativity will take over the mind. The intellect is not the king here, but the mind is. But if a negative thought  arises in the mind of that one with a purified intellect, his intellect will be able to easily see the unreality of that thought and thus not give any heed to it and thus the negative thought fails to get a grip on the mind and dies out. Here intellect is the king. Whatever sound it creates, the mind will carry the same vibration (read verses 23, 26, 143).

The primary guru is the Manas; the secondary preceptor is he who initiates you. The secondary guru is the teacher. 
The primary guru is the mind (internal) and the secondary guru (external) is the one who initiates you (physical guru) who is the teacher. (see verse 27).

The primary guru is that which practices. Realisation is the primary guru.
The internal guru (mind) is that which practices and realises. That is why he says internal realisation is the primary guru. 

You cannot have a secondary preceptor unless you have a desire to have him. When you have the desire to possess a thing you require a secondary guru. The secondary guru is he who shows you the well. The primary guru is he who drinks water from the well.
You cannot have an external guru unless you desire for one. It is only when one has a desire to possess something (like wisdom/health/etc) you require the external guru. The external guru is he who can take you to the well, but it is the primary guru within that drinks the water from the well. Meaning, the external guru can guide you, teach you, support you, help you towards realisation, but it is the internal guru that drinks the wisdom, experiences and perceives everything internally, all within your awareness that consciously experiences it.

The primary preceptor banishes the darkness in you, giving you light. Darkness is ignorance; light is knowledge. He who shows you the path to the subtle, leaving aside the gross, is the guru.
The internal guru (intellect) banishes the darkness in you (by direct experience of the dark aspects within and the illumination of that darkness with a purified intellect) thus giving you light. Darkness is that ignorance that flees with the light of knowledge (gyan/intellect). Guru is the one who shows you the path to the subtle (advaita/nonduality) by leaving aside the gross (dvaita/duality), by constantly pointing you towards that higher truths by which you transcend the lower pull of the gross world and enable you to move higher to the subtler higher truths.

 The one guru who is in all is the Lord of the Universe. One is not the guru to the other. One is only a secondary guru. Guru is the Lord of the Universe. He is the Omkar, Brahma, Vishnu, Maheshwara, the origin of ParaBrahma. Vishnu is the mental modifications (Vrittis). What is Shiva is the decoration of the body. Brahmeshwara is leaving aside of the body idea, like the kernel of a dry coconut which is separated from the outer covering.
The internal guru that prevails in everyone is the Lord of the Universe. The external Guru is not the Guru of the primary (inner) Guru, but is only the secondary Guru (see verse 27). This internal guru, the Lord of the Universe is the Omkar, Brahma, Vishnu, Maheshwara, the origin of Parabrahma.  at Guru or the universal Guru. Vishnu is the vrittis or mental modification which gives rise to maya. That is how Vishnu (Hari) has been referred to Maya in the Chidakasha Gita (read verse 118). Shiva is the decoration of the body (garb/mala/ash-smeared body/tilak/etc). Brahmeshwara is what is leaving aside aspects of Shiva and Vishnu (maya/identification with the body) much like how the kernel of a dry coconut gets fully sepearated from the outer shell. When this happens it is the experience of ‘Aham Brahmasmi’.

(To see references on ‘Guru’ read verses 27, 28, 29, 35, 63, 84, 89, 103, 103, 128, 185, 188, 228 & 285)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 189

All things with form is OMKAR. OMKAR is the divine in them. What is OMKAR is the subtle “Bindu”. Omkar pervades both in and out, in the form of air. It is impossible to describe Shiva-Shakti (energy of Shiva). Only those who have experienced it can describe what it is. Without experience, it is impossible to describe what Shiva-Shakti is. Men of book knowledge cannot describe it. But those who have the knowledge of the Atman can describe it.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that all the things with form is Omkar, because all everything in the gross world that has a form has taken that form from the formless, which is nothing but the Omkar (read verses 109, 110 & 122). Omkar is the divine subtle seed in all forms, which is the subtle Bindu. Bindu is the point of creation from where everything manifested and Bindu is the vibration of Omkar. He says Omkar pervades in and out, in the form of air (prana). Everything is made out of the subtle conscious energy called prana (life-giving force), which is created from the subtle sound of the Omkar. The whole creation comes into existence only with the merging of Shiva and Shakti that are inseparable. Shiva is the consciousness and Shakti is the vibration (spandan) of that consciousness, which manifests grossly in energy and creation. He says that Shiva-Shakti is impossible to be described and only those who have experienced it can describe it. Without experiencing it first-hand it is impossible to describe it. It is impossible to describe it by mere bookish knowledge but only those who have the knowledge of the Atman (Self) can describe it.

(Read all verses on Omkar in verses 6, 80, 109, 110, 121, 122, 130, 133, 140, 144, 165, 172 & 188)

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 190

“If you see the dawn in the heart sky, it is possible to describe it. One must experience these things in one’s Self. What is called Jnana is in Buddhi (intellect). Those in whom Buddhi and Jnana have become one, can describe what this is. Those in whom intelligence and Jnana are separate, cannot describe what it is. What is called “subtle discrimination” is the union of Buddhi and Jnana. The reflection of the sun, ripples in the water. So also, is mind. If mind is fickle, it is enamoured of Maya. This madness (delusion) is caused by the “gross”. There is a madness caused by “subtle discrimination”; this is divine madness. The gross madness is the gross discrimination. Whatever we may eat, the path of food to the stomach is the same. Whatever may be the contents of letters and post cards and various newspapers, the box in which they are posted is the same. The tongue distinguishes between things pungent and things sour. To the mind, there is no such difference. Just as we cage a bird binding its legs and then teach it to speak, so also intelligence becomes one with the soul when it is caged in the cage of Manas.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that if the dawn can be experienced in the inner space of one’s Chidakasha (heart space), then it is possible to describe it. This must be experienced in one’s Self, he says. What is Jnana (wisdom) is Buddhi (intelligence). Those in whom these two have merged (wisdom+intelligence) and become one, can describe this, but cannot be described by those in whom wisdom and intelligence as still separate. The union of the buddhi + intellect is what is called as ‘subtle discrimination’.  (see below additional notes for details).

The  reflection of the sun creates enchanting ripples in the water; the illusory golden shiny ripples are nothing but water. Similarly, if the mind is fickle, it is attracted and filled with love for maya (illusory attractions of the world). He says this madness (craze for worldly pleasures) is caused by the gross. He says there is another madness created by the subtle discrimination and this is divine madness. Meaning, one goes mad behind the real bliss of enlightenment and there is divine madness in the pursuit of this higher desire. The enchantment is no more towards the glittery reflection of the Sun in the waters but towards the Sun itself. Whereas the gross discrimination can only create gross madness (behind worldly pleasures). To know more about gross discrimination and subtle discrimination see below additional notes.

He says whatever we eat, the path (from the mouth to the stomach) remains the same. So also, whatever the contents of the letter, post cards, and various newspapers may be, they all come into the same postbox. Meaning, any language, path, religion, faith it may be, it all leads to the same destination, it all has to reach the same destination. Knowing this in true inner experience is the gift of ‘subtle discrimination’. He says that it is the tongue that distinguishes between the pungent and the sour taste, but to the mind it does not make a difference. Mind may accept all food but the tongue may not. He is referring to mind as the ‘subtle discrimination’ and tongue as the ‘gross discrimination’.

He says that just as we keep a bird in a cage and binding its legs teach it to speak, so also if the intelligence is caged in the mind (wisdom+intelligence) then this higher intelligence becomes one with the soul which is the state of liberation (mukti).

Additional Notes

What is wisdom + intelligence (Jnana + Buddhi)?

If you have been regularly reading the posts here, you would have known that Buddhi is the intellect, which has the function of Viveka (power to discriminate between right/wrong and real/unreal). The Buddhi (intellect )means intelligence, but it is not intelligence alone. Intelligence is the ability to learn, adapt, reason, solve, decide, etc. But only intelligence is not enough, as a person may solve or take a decision using intelligence, but it is not guaranteed that the solution or the decision taken is a right one of that for the highest  good of oneself and others. It takes wisdom to have the right insight and understanding along with the right judgement or discernment. Thus, only when wisdom (jnana) and intelligence (buddhi) come together does Viveka (right discrimination) develop, which enables one to take the right decision. Only intelligence at work will take decisions or make choices depending on purely what the contents of the mind are (influenced by vasanas/samskaras) and that need not be the purest. This is what Bhagwan is referring to as ‘gross discrimination’. But the intelligence that works with wisdom ensures that decisions or choices are made based on what is right and are thus pure choices. The whole of Chidakasha when talking about buddhi (intellect) is actually talking about this combined faculty (wisdom+intelligence).  This is what Bhagwan is referring to as ‘subtle discrimination’. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 191

The Lord of Mukti is Shiva. Shiva is the Linga in the head. This Linga is nothing but Omkar. Enlightenment is the most important thing. Without nadis, there is no sound. Bhakti may be compared to the oil in a lamp. Nadis may be red to the wick. Subtle discrimination is the flame or the light. The nadis are the glass of the lantern. The various air holes of the lantern are the Brahma-Randhras. The form of discrimination is intelligence.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the Lord of liberation is Shiva (supreme consciousness). Shiva is the linga in the head and the linga is nothing but the Omkar (for indepth understanding read the additional notes below). He says that enlightenment is the most important thing, meaning the highest priority of human life. He says without nadis there is no sound. Because Nadis are the channels through which movement of prana takes place. Movement is vibration (sound). Also, in verse 139, it was explained how when vayu (prana) is moving freely in the nadis without any blockage, it is an indication of the purified state of the individual, which then validates itself with the experiencing of the 10 subtle sounds that cannot be heard by any ordinary man (more details in verse 139). 

He compares bhakti (devotion) to the oil in the lamp. He compares nadis to the wick of the lamp. He compares subtle discrimination (the light of the intellect) to the flame or the light of the lamp. Meaning, it takes devotion (oil) which travels up the wick (nadis) like prana travelling up the nadis.  Where the three nadis meet (heart space/agya chakra/chidakasha) is where the prana reaches from lower chakras through the nadis and illuminates this heart space. Here the Buddhi (intellect) is illuminated, which (Buddhi) is what Bhagwan refers to as ‘subtle discrimination.’

He also refers the nadis to the glass of the lantern and the holes in the top of the lantern as the Brahmarandhras (see in-depth insights about Brahmarandhra in verses 59, 69, 85, 121 & 136)

Additional Notes

What is actually the Shiva Linga?

Linga means symbol or form.  Shiva Linga means the form of Shiva.

Bindu (meaning dot or point) is the origin of the cosmos from where all universes and all creations manifest. That is why this hub is known as the cosmic egg, within which the union of Shiva (consciousness) and Shakti (creative energy of consciousness) fertilises the egg to create life. You must have heard of the term Brahmanda which means Universe. So the creation of the Universe is Brahmanda. If you split the word, it is Brahma (creator) and anda (egg), or it simply means the Egg of the Creator.  The first form ever of this point of fusion of Shiva and Shakti is light. The vibration caused by this divine fusion is Omkar. Thus, Bhagwna is referring to the Shiva Linga as Omkar. The radiance of light from this Bindu is an oval-shaped light, just like how a flame is. The flame has to take the oval shape (egg shape). This is the shape of any naturally radiating light. So the light at the source of creation is the shape of egg, which is referred to as linga (meaning oval-shaped). So the light of Shiva (supreme consciousness) is Shiva Linga. This is one step down the absolute nothing, that is the first form – light. The term ‘jyotirlinga” means the linga in the form of jyoti (light). From nothing came light, the first form.
It is interesting to note that even the Bible begins with the statement that initially there was only void and God said, “Let there be light and there was light”. Here, God is not an entity but it is referring to the Supreme Consciousness itself, which Christians refer to as God and Hindus refer to as Shiva. Similarly, the Omkar is referred in the Bible as “word”. It says, “In the beginning was the word and the word was with god and the word was god.” So, this form of light (linga) and sound (om) are the very basis of creation, which Bhagwan often mentions in the Chidakasha Gita. All this expounds so clearly all paths and religions speak about one ultimate truth, though terminologies is only what makes them take more dualisitic forms and divisions. 

When he says “Shiva is the linga in the head” he is referring to the light of the self that illuminates itself as light. Since the self is a spark of the creator, its form is light too that takes the form of linga.  The whole idea behind the “Shiva Manas Puja” advocated by Adi Shankaracharya is very much this, where he is worshiping Shiva not in the external gross form of a stone Shiva Linga, but worhshipping this subtle form of Shiva Linga in the head. This is pure advaita (nonduality). This is why Bhagwan is saying in this verse “Shiva is Linga in the head.”

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 192

If you hold nose and mouth tight, you are not able to talk. Similarly, a thing that does not breathe, does not emit sound. Just as water goes on diminishing in a well in summer, so also, the power of breath goes on diminishing in the body. When the water is moving, the air moves along with it. You can live without food or without drinking coffee for five days. But you cannot live for five minutes without breathing.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that you cannot talk if you hold you nose and mouth tight. Meaning, you cannot function without breath.  If breath is stopped, life stops. Similarly, a thing that does not breath does not emit sound. Sound means vibration. Everything that moves does create vibrations and thus sound. Sound is nothing but vibrations. Different sounds are simply different frequencies of vibrations. He says just as the water in the well goes on diminishing during summer, so also does the power of breath keep diminishing in the body with time. Life decreases with the decrease in the breath or with decrease in the power of breath. The longer or deeper the breaths, the longer the life expectancy. He says when water is moving air moves along with it. It is air that moves water. Without air, water cannot move. Similarly, breath (prana) circulates blood throughout the body.. In verse 141 he says that if vayu (air/breath) doesn’t move, there is no blood circulation. He says you can live without eating or drinking for 5 days but you cannot live without 5 minutes of breathing. This verse stresses on the importance of breath (prana).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 193

“The highest of all powers is the power of Maya. A dead body and so also a stone, are unable to talk. Likewise, if air does not act, fire cannot burn; i.e., if breathing is not regular, the fire of digestion will be impaired. When the digestive fire does not act properly, the phlegm in the lungs, becomes hard. Fat increases in the body. The food that is eaten, remains in the stomach undigested. If there is any obstruction in the pump, water will not flow out properly. Similarly, if the breathing becomes difficult, fever, thickening of the mucus, are caused. By this, all diseases are caused.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that of all the powers, the most powerful is the power of Maya. A stone and a dead body are similar because both do not have prana in them. Similarly, without air (breath) the fire cannot burn. (Read verse 32). Meaning, if the breathing is not proper (regular and deep), it impairs the digestive fire. When digestive fire does not function properly, the phlegm (kapha) harden in the lungs and fFat begins increasing in the body. The food lies in the stomach itself undigested. Just like how water does not flow in a clogged pipeline, breathing also gets obstructed due to the thickening of the mucus, and this is how all diseases are caused

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 194

“Everything comes out from within; not from without. One becomes bad by oneself; one becomes good by oneself. Similarly, there should be Omkar breathing within. Then, there is purity. ‘When evil merges in the good, that evil is transformed into good; the thing in your own hand has no smell; it has no price. A thing that is got from others, has smell; it has price. A Raja yogi Mahatma is Nithyananda, all pervasive Omkar, all pervasive Pranava. He who is the Sri Guru is Nithyananda. In the beginning, before perfect peace is attained, the power of Maya (delusion) in us will be greatly manifested. Wherever you turn your eyes, you see serpents. In the beginning, when you sit for practice, the heaviness of a mountain is experienced. At times, you feel as if you leave off the ground; you feel as if you are sitting in the sea; you feel as if hot water is poured on you. At another time, you feel as if you are sitting in a grand upper story. Sometime you feel like a needle. At another time, you feel like a leaf. Sometime you do not feel whether you are walking or sitting or talking. At another time all feeling comes to a standstill. Sometime, the body becomes quite motionless, like a coconut tree. At another time, human beings appear like actors in a dramatic performance. At one time you see black faces. In perfect peace, one indivisible whiteness is visible. Light is in darkness; darkness is in light. The whole universe is in darkness. In the universe, is light. At one time, all this appears like a bioscopic performance; at another time, like Sat Chit Ananda. At one time, questions arise: “Why have men come into this world? Whither are they going?” They do not know what their main duty is. Coming down is not permanent. Going up and up, is permanent. To those who have gone step by step to the upper story and look around, what is heard, what appears, what is done, all is like a net, that cannot be cut through. All penetrating Omkar is the all penetrating Pranava. Birds are like airplanes. Men are like beasts. Beasts are like men. Dogs are like Jnyanis. If you feed a dog, it will never forget you till its death. It will have constant love for the master, who has fed it but once. Men have no subtle discrimination. They think not whence they have come and whither they are bound. A man of perfectly ripe understanding should be like a dog.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that everything manifests from within (inside) and not exactly from without (outside). One becomes good or bad by oneself. Meaning, as one thinks, feels and emotes, so one becomes just that. Whatever the intention one becomes that. If one thinks always of impure thoughts one becomes impure and if one thinks consistently pure thoughts one becomes pure. To bring purity, one should practice the Omkar breathing within. (See details of this in verse 6).

When the good qualities increases, the evil qualities dissolve into the good. The increase in the SATVA quality automatically reduces the RAJAS & TAMAS qualities (see in-depth about the 3 qualities in verse 55).  That is the importance of being in the aura of the good, the enlightened beings – the aura of the Master. Even the evil who comes in the vicinity of the good, gets transformed into good. (Read a beautiful insight to this in verse 80). The Guru is one perfect example for this in whose vicinity one gradually transforms. One neither knows the fragrance nor the price or value of that which is in one’s hand, but what is received from others is always valuable and fragrant. We see what is in others as fragrant and valuable but we do not feel the fragrance or value of our own inner powers, abilities and potentials. We may fail to see the power and the fragrance of our own love, but when we receive it from others, it is always fragrant and valuable.  The Omkar is present in each but none values it but one finds the grace of Omkar received from the Guru as fragrant and valuable. The Raj Yogi Mahatma (enlightened one) is Nithyananda, all pervasive Omkar, the all-pervasive Pranava mantra (Om). He who is the Sri Guru is Nithyananda (eternal bliss).

During the soul journey, after coming in touch with the Guru or an enlightened being, the churning begins and before the perfect peace can be attained by the seeker, all illusions within the seeker begins surfacing before they can be released. One may have vivid experiences, like seeing serpents wherever one looks. When one sits for practice one may experience the heaviness of a mountain. At times one may feel as if one is floating off the ground or oen is sitting in the sea or one may feel as if hot water is poured on them. At other times one may feel as though one is sitting in a grand high rise building. Sometimes one might feel like a needle. At another time, one may feel like a leaf. Sometime one does not feel that one is walking or sitting or talking. At another time all experiences come to a standstill. Sometimes, the body may become quite motionless like a coconut tree and yet at another time to him, other human beings may appear like actors in a dramatic performance, playing various roles in the play.  At one time one may see black faces. All such experiences take place before one attains perfect peace (self-realization). In this state of perfect peace, one indivisible whiteness becomes visible. This is the state of perfect nonduality, where light exists in darkness and darkness in the light. It is revealed how the whole Universe is in darkness and the whole Universe is light. At one time, all this appears like a movie and at another time, everything is like Sat-Chit-Ananda. (see verse 112)

At one time, questions may arise: “Why have humans come into this world and where are they going?” One begins pondering on why do one takes birth and what is their soul purpose. Questions begin arising on where one has come from and where one is going.  One begins to realise that man has actually forgotten what his main duty is (to realise the Self and liberate oneself from the birth and death cycle).

Bhagwan says coming down is not permanent but going up and up is. Downward means lower desires of materialistic pursuits and going upward means higher desires of liberation. Downward means seeking permanent happiness in worldly pursuits, which is an impossible illusory pursuit because nothing of the world is permanent. It is an illusion that one can get permanent happiness in worldly pursuits, which is why it is called maya (delusion). That is why he says, going up and up is permanent because one is  moving upwards towards realising one’s true state which is that which is truly infinite and eternal. 

He says that to those who have gone to the upper storey of the building (evolved higher) and they look around, they realise that everything in the world – what is heard, what is seen and what is being done are all nothing more than a strong net that is so difficult to cut through. This is why the illusions of the world is known as “maya jaal” meaning “web of illusions” in which one gets caught up in and is hard to get out.

He says the all the penetrating Omkar is the all penetrating Pranava. Pranava means primordial or that which began first. Omkar is the first sound from which all creation happened (deeper details in verse 62 & 10). In just two verses earlier (191) it was explained as to how the Omkar sound is what pervades through everything and how everything is made out of the Omkar. 

He says birds are like airplanes, meaning they live a robotic life under the karmic cause and effect. They cannot choose or have a freewill like man but are destined to keep only flying from here to there their whole lives without a purpose. He says men are like beasts. Meaning, man lives with animalistic tendencies. Animal, like the birds, also have no purpose other than eating, procreating, surviving, protecting itself, guarding it’s space and territories, grabbing what belongs to others, fight for its ownership, if not fight then run away at threat, prioritising its own survival and existence before all other beasts,  and finally die without any awareness of the whole process of life. Animals live under the cause and effect of karma, and unlike humans, do not not have freewill and hence they cannot choose or decide like man. But unfortunately even though man is the only creature on earth who has been gifted this gift of awareness, choice, freewill, man yet fails to remember his true purpose and utilise these gifts to navigate out of the web of illusions, and unfortunately, like the beasts and bird, just survive and die (read the importance of human birth in verse 87). 

He then says that dogs are like Jnyanis (enlightened). If you feed a dog, it will never forget you till its death. It will have constant love for the master, who has fed it but once. He refers to the loyalty, dedication and consistency that only the awakened have towards their Master, for they realise the value of having been touched by the grace of an awakened Master, who reminded them of their true purpose of human life. Thus the disciple will never forsake the love and gratitude for their Master till the end. But then he says that men have no subtle discrimination. Meaning, they cannot discriminate between the real and unreal, between the right and wrong. An awakened Buddhi (intellect) only can show one this. When one does not have subtle discrimination then one’s life becomes ignorant like that of the birds and beasts, not knowing where they have come from and where are they going. So, he says that perfectly ripe understanding in man means being like the dog, that remains grateful to the Master who fed it (man being reminded of their true purpose) and thus not forgetting their goal ever.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 195

If you go to see a king, you have not the boldness to tell him to his face what his defects are. But behind his back, you criticize him. So also, people (worldly) are not bold enough to criticize a Jnani to his face. If you gaze at the brilliance of the sun and come into the house, you see nothing for a while. Similarly, if you emerge from a dark place into a light place, you cannot know whence you emerged.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that noone has the boldness to tell a king on his face what his defects are, but behind his back all criticism can happen. One cannot dare talk about the short-comings of a powerful person on his face but very easily one can criticize about him behind his back. Similarly, people are not bold enough to criticise a Jnani (enlightened) on his face. He says if you gaze at the bright sunlight for a while and then walk into the house, for a while you cannot see anything. Same is what happens if you have been in the presence or the aura of an enlightened being, you are dazzled. When you turn back into the world, you cannot see or be effected by the worldly things for sometime until the dazzle withers off in time. It takes a while for you to adjust back with the world. He says, that similarly, if you have been in any dark space and then go into sunlight, you cannot know where you came from. Same way, if one has been for sometime in the gross world or in the darkness and then turns towards a self-realized being, the brilliance of spiritual aura would dazzle you and it could take a for a while for you to ascertain where you came from. Read one such interesting verse 80.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 196

Suppose a man awakes from a sleep out of fear, and sits up, then he is so confused that he has no clear knowledge of anything, so also, Jnanis who are always in “Yoga-Nidra” (yoga sleep) do not know anything about the external world. If you have an umbrella, your head does not become wet by rain water. Those who take meals daily, have hunger. Those who are entirely merged in cold water do not feel cold. A perfect man is never excited to anger. A fried seed cannot sprout. Like gold, well burnished, your mind should be always pure.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that at night if you wake up all of a sudden from sleep out of fear and sit up, you would be confused and it maybe hard for you to grasp where are you or what really happened. He says this is the state of Jnanis (enlightened ones) who are always internally absorbed in the state of Yog Nidra (deep conscious sleep) and they are not conscious of their external world. (To know more of ‘Yog Nidra’ read verses 10 & 115).

He says if you have an umbrella over your head then your head does not get wet.Similarly, the one who is in the shelter of higher states of consciousness does not get wet in the rain of desires and attractions.

He says those who take their meals daily, have hunger. Meaning, the one who is consistently and regularly feeding their desires, remain hungry for more.

He says those who are entirely merged in cold water do not feel cold. Meaning, those who are entirely merged with the Supreme consciousness, are not affected by the dualities of pain and pleasure, cravings and aversions, etc.

He says a perfect man is never excited to anger in the same way that the one fully immersed in cold water will not feel the cold. He says that a fried seed cannot sprout. Meaning, in one in who is liberated, no desires can sprout because all the seeds of desire itself have been burnt. So, Bhagwan says, like gold in which all other impurities are removed and is well polished, the mind should also remain pure.  

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 197

A high class cobra has internal Pranayama. A cobra is very attentive to the sweet music, arising from a musical instrument called ‘Nagaswara’. A Jnyani loves ALL as a cow loves its own calf. This is what is called ‘same-sightedness’. There is no house which is without doors; there is no cooking without vessels. A dog feeds on food, cooked either in earthen vessels or in gold vessels. Birds think of today’s necessities; never tomorrow’s. A seed, kept in a closed box, never sprouts. Such a seed, never yields fruits. If it is sowed in earth (and watered), it will sprout and yield fruits. Hence, we must practice and get experience. It is you yourself who is responsible either for happiness or misery.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

 Bhagwan reveals that a high class cobra has internal Pranayama. Ancient Yogis discovered this fact and have used it in their practices which later certain schools of tantra taught this powerful breathing technique in certain lineages.  Only “high class” cobras breathed in this certain way that later only “high class” humans (the Yogis) practiced.  He says that a cobra is very attentive to the sweet music arising from the musical instrument called ‘Nagaswara’ or also known as the ‘been’ in Hindi. Similarly, one must be attuned to the ‘nada’ (music) within. (for more on the ‘music within’ read verse 3).

He says that a Jnani loves everyone just like how a cow loves its own calf. This, he calls as ‘samadrishti’ or ‘same-sightedness’. He says just as a building without doors cannot be called a house and just as without vessels cooking is not possible, similarly one who is not aware of this internal breath cannot be self-realised (Jnani).

He says that a dog eats from any kind of vessel, be it earthen vessel or golden vessel. Similarly, for a Jnani there is no difference between gold and mud; he treats everyone and everything alike.

He says birds are only focussed on their today’s food and never remain worried for tomorrow unlike man who cannot live in the present moment like the Jnanis. He says that a seed that is kept in a closed box never sprouts nor yields fruits, but if it is sowed in earth, it will sprout and yield fruits. Meaning one must practice and get experience. So, it is important that one practices and gain direct experience because every individual are totally responsible for their happiness or misery.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 198

Anybody can handle a lamp without distinction of caste and creed. So also, the sun gives the same light to all. Sun is visible to all alike. Fire is visible to all alike. Supreme Buddhi (intelligence) and Jnan (knowledge) are one to those who have developed in them the power of the internal eye.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who have realised the ultimate truth of oneness will never distinguish or hold distinction between anything for all are equal to them. They handle everyone just like how the lamp can be handled by anyone without distinction of caste or creed. Just like how the sun gives light to all and visible to all without any partiality. He says that the supreme Buddhi (higher intelligence) and supreme Jnan (higher wisdom) are merged in those who have developed the power of their internal eye (third eye). 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 199

Those who have no subtle discrimination are not worth the name ‘men’. A man is not an animal. The gross is the body idea. The subtle is the thought of Atman. Jeevatma is the gross. Paramatma is the subtle. Without the gross, the subtle cannot be realized. Without a foundation, a house cannot be erected. Thought power (power of discrimination) is what is called Shiva Shakti. The union of Jeevatma and Paramatma is called ‘Shiva Shakti’. When this power is intensified, man becomes ‘superman’. A superman is a happy man; he is a Brahmin, knower of Brahma. Vedantic conduct or behavior is ‘true character formation’.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who have no subtle discrimination are not worth to be called ‘men’. Meaning, those who do not use their viveka in life to discriminate between right and wrong and what is real and unreal, are not worthy to be called humans.

He says a man is not an animal. Because only man is gifted with the faculty of viveka that no other beings on the planet have. Thus, if man does not use it, then , there is no difference between a human and other species. So, he says man is not an animal, because man can reason and use the intelligence and wisdom to discriminate between good and bad, between truth and illusions. 

He says being identified with the body is gross and being identified with the Self (Atman) is subtle. Jeevatma (human) is gross and Parmatma (god) is subtle. He says that without a foundation, a house cannot be erected. Meaning, without the gross (body) the subtle (god) cannot be realised. It is impossible to attain self-realisation without a human body. To realise that which is formless, the form is needed. It is only through duality that one realises nonduality. 

 Thought power (power of discrimination) is what is called Shiva Shakti (see verse 149). The union of Jeevatma and Paramatma is called ‘Shiva Shakti’. (see verses 57 & 170). When this power is intensified, man becomes ‘superman’. Meaning, when the intellect (buddhi) is purified, the power of discrimination intensifies and man transitions into a superman (with extraordinary powers or capabilities). He says that a superman is a happy man (blissful) and he is a Brahmin (not the bodily caste Brahmin but one who is self-realised) – the knower of Brahma is Brahmin. He says that true character is in vedantic conduct or behavior. Meaning the one who lives in line with the Vedanta (the Upanishads that are elaboration of the Vedas) has the true character or conduct.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 200

He who is desireless is an ‘Acharya’ (teacher). Desireless man is the Sanyasi. He is an Avadhoota in this world, who has abandoned desire. Avadhoota is a man of the first class; he is the most supreme of men. There is no state higher than that of Avadhoota. Avadhoota is he who is above all. He to whom this world and the next have become one is an Avadhoota. Consciousness sky; real sky; emancipation from bondage; the bliss of self-government; the bliss of Brahma; real bliss; yoga bliss; fulfilment of human birth; lordship of Mukti; power to teach emperors; these are the ‘possessions’ of an Avadhoota.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who is desireless is an ‘Acharya’. The sanyasi is the one who is desireless. He is an Avadhoota in this world, who has abandoned desire. Avadhoota is a man who lives in the world but with no absolute desire and thus he is the most supreme among the human species. There is no state higher than the state of an Avadhoota as he is above all. Man returns to earth only as a result of their desire (selfish cause), but an Avadhoota is one who is completely purified and returns to the earth plane with only the sole purpose to help others ascend (purely selfless cause). 

The Avadhoota is the one to whom this world and the next world have become one. This world means where one lives as a separate entity (Jeevatma) from god (Parmatma). Next world means the state where one realises the Self and now lives merged with god (Jeevatma+Parmatma). [Read verse 57].

The Avadhoota has no possessions but his only possessions are the sky of consciousness (Chidakasha) which is the real sky, emancipation (freedom) from all bondages; the bliss of self-government (sovereignty); the bliss of Brahma (Brahmananda); real bliss (Paramananda); yoga bliss (Yogananda); fulfilment of human birth (Jeevan-safalya); lordship of Mukti (Jeevan-mukt) and holding the power to teach emperors.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 201

He who meditates on God and who is desireless, is the saviour of the world. He who meditates on God is the “Muni” (sage). He is Shiva and Shiva is he. All that is visible is Shiva.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who meditates on God and is desireless, is the saviour of the world. He who meditates on God is the ‘Muni’ (sage). He becomes one with the supreme consciousness and thus is Shiva and Shiva is he. He becomes one with everything (omnipresent) because all that is visible is nothing but Shiva (supreme consciousness).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 202

One who has not realized the truth is a beggar. One who has not destroyed delusion, one who has not left off the downward (worldly) path, is a beggar.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that one who has not realized the truth (of the unreality of the world) is a beggar. One who has not destroyed delusion, one who has not left off the downward (worldly) path, is a beggar.  Downward means one’s pull towards the grosser worldly desires.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 203

Those who are indifferent to honor and dishonor, enjoy bliss, true bliss which is the same as Brahmananda, i.e., at-one-ment with the God-head. If we concentrate our intellectual powers for five minutes, we feel that bliss. Those who have not realized the primordial cause, have not realized the goal of life. Like flies falling into the flame of a burning lamp, those who have not realized the truth, are caught, in the “net of delusion”. The flies repeatedly see the lamp. They repeatedly hover round the lamp and at last they fall into it and die.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who is indifferent to honor and dishonor, enjoys the true bliss, which is known as Brahmananda. Bliss is the nature of the godhead and so when one merges with the god head, one experiences Brahmananda. He says that if one can concentrate well on the intellectual powers (gyanmaya or ‘intellect body’) one can experience that bliss. (To know more about 5 bodies read verse 1). He adds that those who have not realized the primordial cause, have not realized the goal of life. Primordial cause is the Self (or god consciousness). So the one who has not realised the Self, remain trapped in the delusion of maya. This strong pull or lure of maya generates desires that keeps them hovering around the worldly objects like the flies that get attracted to the glare of the burning lamp. He says that the flies repeatedly see the lamp and repeatedly hover around the lamp and finally they fall into the fire and die. Likewise, man repeatedly desires and lusts for worldly objects and remains immersed in them and dies without realising their real purpose of having taken human birth.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 204

Those who do not practice Pranayama (control of breath) have no yoga. It is impossible to draw water from a well without a rope. Those who are not free from bondage have no peace. No one can live without drinking water. Those who have annihilated the mind, are desire less. Babies are Raja-yogis till the sixth month. After the brain is developed, the same baby is Hatha-yogi. The mind in such babies is very fickle. Because the discriminating power is less in them, babies cannot distinguish between a lump of sugar and a lump of earth. Hence, such babies regard earth and sugar as the same. The fruit is always at the top of the tree. Similarly, the fruit in man is upwards. If you plant a coconut in the earth, coconuts are eventually seen at the top of the coconut tree. For every tree, the fruit is at the top.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who do not practice Pranayama (conscious internal breathing) have no yoga. (Read verse 45 & 56).

It is impossible to draw water from a well without a rope. He is referring to the process of conscious internal breathwork. (Read verse 6).

Those who are not free from bondage have no peace. He is referring to the bondage of karma due to the bondage of earthly attachments.

No one can live without drinking water. He is referring to living (immortality) on the ambrosial nectar in the head. (Read verse 94).

Those who have annihilated the mind, are desireless. Mind is the cause of all desires. (Read verses 90, 92, 178 & 179).

Babies are Raj-yogis till the sixth month. After the brain is developed, the same baby is Hatha-yogi. The mind in such babies is very fickle. Because the discriminating power is less in them, babies cannot distinguish between a lump of sugar and a lump of earth. Hence, such babies regard earth and sugar as the same. Meaning that as the mind gets developed, it becomes more and more fickle as it grows and begins discriminating and differentiating due to the effect of duality. But a baby that is just few months old is pure without the influence of Maya, and this state can be compared to the state of a self-realised being. (More in-depth understanding of this read verse 149).

The fruit is always at the top of the tree. Similarly, the fruit in man is upwards. If you plant a coconut in the earth, coconuts are eventually seen at the top of the coconut tree. For every tree, the fruit is at the top. He is referring to the energy to be pulled up from the lower chakras to higher chakras until it can reach and stay still at the internal eye (third eye or agna chakra), where  receives the fruits of his sadhana. (Read verse 151).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 205

“The umbrella does not hold the man; all is held by the mind. When the mental moods are destroyed, all differences disappear. Such a man has no desire. He is a Sanyasi. He is a yogi. A man who has Manas wants everything. A man who has no Manas, has everything in himself. Just as in a steamer, there is all sorts of commodities, so also, a man who has conquered the mind, has the whole world in himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the umbrella does not hold the man but all is held by the mind. Meaning, the dualities of maya does not grip a man, but it is man who grips on to maya through the mind. So, maya exists only as long as mind exists.

He says that when the mental moods are destroyed, all differences disappear. All mental moods and attitudes are due the fluctuations of the thoughts and desires in the mind. It is the mind that perceives duality in everything that it sees and thus makes distinctions between everything. When these fluctuations of the mind are dissolved then all such distinctions and dualities disappear. Such a man will have no desire. He is a Sanyasi. He is a yogi.

He says that a man who has manas (mind) has desires and he wants everything. A man who has no mind, has everything within himself. In a steamer, there are all sorts of commodities and one does not have to go anywhere for anything, everything is provided within the steamer (or call it a cruise ship). Similarly, the man who has conquered the mind has no need to seek anything outside of him, as he has the whole world within himself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 206

“When a boat is sailing, everything around appears to move. So also, when mind is disappearing, everything appears to whirl round. What is experienced in sleep is not experienced in the waking state. What is experienced in the waking state is not experienced in sleep. If you place a vessel, without water, over fire, no sound is produced. In order to produce sound, water is necessary. So also, those who have no subtle discrimination, will not be benefitted. If you are bitten by a cobra in sleep, you will not die. In sleep, mind is quiescent. When there is Manas, there is everything. What is called ‘creation’ is a mental affection. When there is thorough ‘introspection’, there is no creation.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when one is sailing in a boat, everything around also appears to move. As mentioned in many times verses that the world exists to a person only as long as the mind exists. The whole experience of life to man is only due to mind. All duality is experienced by the mind only. Bhagwan says that when this mind begins dissolving (as one evolves) the whole world appears to whirl round (because the world also is now dissolving).

There are three states of consciousness – the waking (Jagrut), deep sleep (Sushupti) and dream state (Svapna). In ‘waking state’, the mind is fully active and thus the whole maya (illusionary world) appears real to the mind. But as soon as the person falls asleep, the mind remains half awake and it is the same mind in which dreams play, which is known as the ‘dream state’. In the dream state, all the illusory contents of the mind now begin appearing real. In this state, the waking world no more exists but the dream world becomes alive. When the person moves into ‘deep sleep’ state, the mind becomes fully inactive and thus all the experiences of the waking and dream state vanish. In the deep sleep state there is only awareness, the soul consciousness. Thus Bhagwan says that what is experienced in sleep is not experienced in the waking state and what is experienced in the waking state is not experienced in sleep.

The contents of the dream and wakeful state depends on what contents the mind holds. One is constantly experiencing the world or the dream depending on the contents of the mind. Thus Bhagwan says that if you place a vessel without water, over fire, there is no sound with the empty vessel but when water is added into the vessel, there is sound. Meaning, with no contents in the mind, there will be no experience of duality, both in the waking and dream state.  It is only when then mind has contents (vasanas/kaamna/samskaras/vrittis OR tendencies/desires/impressions/thoughts) that the whole play of consciousness becomes alive for the person. All human beings continuously experience these three states of consciousness during each lifetime until they learn to transcending these 3 states and enter into the fourth state of consciousness, which is known as ‘turiya’. Glipmses of this state is rarely experienced during very deep meditations when one is able to go beyond the ‘samadhi’ state. It is rare. In this state, the mind is completely non-existent and there is only pure awareness. But rare are the humans (enlightened) who live in this state most of the time. The Avadhootas are ones who remain in this state ALL THE TIME, where mind is totally absent; their minds are completely dissolved. The Chidakasha Gita begins with (verse 1) saying “Jnanis are mindless”. When mind is no more, all dualities are dissolved and there is the subtle discrimination experiencing oneness without even a single distinction of duality.

Thus, Bhagwan says that those who have no subtle discrimination will not be benefitted. He says that if you are bitten by a cobra in sleep, you will not die. In (deep) sleep, the mind is quiescent (inactive). Only when there is Manas (mind), there is everything. He says that what is called as ‘creation’ is only a mental affection. When there is thorough ‘introspection’, there is no creation. Introspection means ‘observing’ by shifting from the mind to awareness. One enters this state of higher awareness only when one transcends the mind because it is only when the mind becomes non-existent that one can enter into the state of samadhi and further beyond into the state of ‘turiya’. So he says when there is thorough introspection, there is no creation.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 207

“In the beginning of practice, the neophyte should diminish sleep. When practicing moderation in diet, one should not bathe in cold water. If you bathe once in four or five hours in cold water, the blood circulation in the body will not be regular. An actor in a theatre, first acts behind the curtain, then he comes out. In the beginning, there must be secrecy; afterwards, it is not necessary. If you pour water in a vessel which is already full, that water flows out. So also, when perfect peace is attained, it becomes known to all. Such a man has no desire. This peace is the supreme. Perfect peace weans union with the God-head.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that in the beginning of the spiritual practices, the neophyte (one who is new to the practice) should reduce sleep. Also during practice moderation in diet is important. (See verses 81 & 82). During practice, one should not bathe in cold water. Bathing once in four or five hours in cold water affects the blood circulation in the body and the circulation will not be regular.

He says that an actor in a theatre, first acts behind the curtain, then he comes out. In the beginning, there must be secrecy; afterwards, it is not necessary. Meaning one should maintain secrecy of their practices in the start. If you pour water in a vessel which is already full, that water flows out. So also, when perfect peace is attained, (that is when the practice has ripened), it becomes known to all. Such a man has no desire. This peace is the supreme. Perfect peace weans (gets accustomed) union with the God-head (Divinity/Supreme).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 208

The form of God is peace. OM and peace are His forms. He is without form. He is without change. He is above discrimination. He is bliss, absolute. Like the lulling of children to sleep in the cradle, we must sleep internally with the Manas for the pillow. We must be successful in each and every test. We cannot get employment unless we succeed in the tests. Knowing to speak english but not knowing how to write, is not knowing english fully.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that God is formless and without change, but when God takes a form, the forms are peace and OM.  God is above discrimination and is absolute bliss. This is why the Shiva consciousness (Supreme consciousness) is referred to as nirguna (qualityless) and nirakar (formless). Read verse 172.

He says that like the lulling of children to sleep in the cradle, we must sleep internally using the Manas as the pillow. Meaning, one must enter into the state of awareness at which point the mind effortlessly goes to rest. Like how the child is gently put to sleep in a cradle, one must gently shift into awareness, which is when the calm and still mind can be used as a pillow.

He says that we must be successful in every test that prevents one from experiencing this state and beyond. He says one cannot get employment unless one succeeds in the tests. Similarly, one cannot experience and reach the goal of samadhi unless one does not persevere to overcome every obstacle and pass every test. He says knowing to only speak English but not knowing how to write English, is not really knowing full English. Meaning, knowing the knowledge of Self and not realising the Self is not knowing the Self. In other words, just knowing about the divine wisdom by reading, listening, talking is not enough but one must experience the divine wisdom and ‘know’ about it from direct experience.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 209

“The throat place is the “Mooladhara” where the serpent power (Kundalini) is originated. The heart space is the place for the throat place. The heart space is in the middle of the eye brows. “Swadhisthana” is in the brain. Ajna is triangular. What is called “Raja Yoga” is above the neck. Ajna is the locality where man attains Mukti. What is called “this world” is Jeevatma. What is called the “next world” is Paramatma. The union of these two is the space of consciousness. Chitta is the mental mood. Sat is the one, indivisible.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the throat place is the “Mooladhara” where the serpent power (Kundalini) is originated. In regular school of practice Mooladhara is considered to be the first chakra located at the base of the spine and the throat center is considered to be the 5th chakra known as Vishuddhi chakra, but here Bhagwan says Mooladhara is situated in the throat center. He calls as that which is above the neck as Raja Yoga and that which is below the neck to be Hattha Yoga. He has mentioned multiple times in the Chidakasha Gita about Hatha Yoga and Raja Yoga. True spiritual evolution begins after one’s consciousness has risen from the base of the spine to the throat center (Hatha Yoga). So, he mentions the throat center as Mooladhara and as the origin point of Kundalini Shakti. From throat center to the Saharara is the real journey to liberation, because from here the doership of “I” starts diminishing and all the 3 gunas start dissolving into nonduality.  (See verse 55). From the root chakra to the throat chakra is all duality and beyond the throat center begins the journey towards nonduality. (See verse 67).

He calls the throat center as mooladhara, brain as swadhisthana and the triangular Ajna as the place of Mukti or liberation. (See verse 91 & 94). This spot between the eye brows is what he has always referred to the heart space.

Interestingly, the throat center is the journey above the 2nd granthis. Granthis are knots of ignorance. These are the main obstacle knots of ignorance which prevent the upward flow of the Kundalini towards its final destination to the Sahasrar chakra. there are 3 granthis. The first granthi (knot) is Brahma granthi that is at the base of the spine and is linked with the Mooladhar and Swadisthan chakra. The root of ignorance lies here with obstacles like material desires, accumulation, physical comforts, sex, procreation, survival, etc. The second granthi (lock) is Vishnu granthi, situated at the solar plexus and linked with the Manipur and Anahata chakras. This knot is linked with the attachments to people, emotional attachment, self-centeredness, lack of concern for others, anger, hatred, jealousy, etc. After this begins the journey from the throat center towards dissolving the third and final knot of Rudra granthi at the Agna chakra. This knot is linked with intellectual pride, fantasies, opinions, and prejudices and the identification with the fal. The death of the ego takes place here, which dissolves as all the 3 gunas get dissolved and one experiences the real “I”.  This journey from throat center to the Ajna is being referred by Bhagwan as the real journey towards dissolution (Raja Yoga)

He says, what is called “this world” is Jeevatma. What is called the “next world” is Paramatma. The union of these two is the space of consciousness. (See verses 57, 170, 173 & 200).

He says that Chitta is the mental mood. Mental mood means the state of the fickle and ever-changing mind and is temporary. Sat is the one, indivisible that is ininite, indivisible and permanent. (See verse 111). 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 210

Pooraka is drawing the breath up. Kumbhaka is retaining the breath. Rechaka is the exhaling of breath. Slowly from within, many sorts of cakes are prepared from the same rice. So also, by breath, everything is accomplished. The functions are different. What is called Pranayama is all internal working. The same is Shiva Shakti in man. When this Shakti is guided to Brahma-Randhra, it is communion with God-head.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan explains about the 3 kinds of breath (as also given by Maharishi Patanjali in Patanjali Yog Sutras) that in pranayama, pooraka is drawing up the breath and retaining or holding the breath is kumbhaka, while exhaling the breath is rechaka.(See verses 56 & 121).

He gives the example of how from the same rice so many types of cakes are made. Similarly, from the same breath (prana) so many different functions take place in the human body and consciousness. He says so much is accomplished by the breath. The pranayama is all about the internal functioning. This is the same Shiva Shakti within all humans. When this Shakti (prana) is directed up through the Sushumna to the Brahmarandhra, it merges with the Supreme (God). See verses 191.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 211

“Shiva Shakti is one indivisible. Shiva Shakti is salvation. Shiva Shakti is the “upward breath”. Shiva Shakti is Prana-vayu. it is the Omkar; it is the Pranava. From Pranava is creation. Pranava is consciousness of the body, Omkar is soul consciousness. Omkar is like the kernel in a dry coconut. The finite becomes one with the infinite. River becomes one with the sea. The mental moods are the rivers; the indivisible Shiva Shakti is the sea. Just as paper when burnt in fire loses its individuality, the mind loses its individuality in the Atman. Five or six roads may have only one junction. We may travel by these roads either by walking or by train. The “body” is the train by which we come and go.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Shiva Shakti is the same indivisible force of the Para-Brahma (Supreme) and so it is salvation. Shiva Shakti is the Prana-vayu, the “upward breath”. Shiva Shakti is the vibration of the primodial sound, the Pranava mantra of Omkar. From Pranava flows out the entire creation. It is thus the consciousness of the body and the soul consciousness. 

He says that the omkar is like the kernel in a dry coconut. (Read verses 4, 5, 94 & 188) .  The finite becomes one with the infinite. River becomes one with the sea. He says the mental moods are the rivers, meaning the fluctuations in the mind and like the many different rivers (duality). The indivisible Shiva Shakti is the sea (nonduality). All rivers lose their different identities when they merge into the sea because they all now become just the sea with no other identity. Just like how when paper is burnt, it loses its individuality in the fire, the mind also loses its individuality in the Atman. Five or six roads may have only one junction. We may travel by these roads either by walking or by train. The body is the train in which we (souls) come and go (birth and death cycle).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 212

Firm posture of the body is like the station. This posture should be an easy posture. This is Raja yoga, what is Asana is seat.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that firm posture of the body must be maintained during the sadhna (spiritual practices). He says that this posture should be an easy posture and that this is Raja yoga, in which asana means the seat.

In Raja yoga there are 8 important steps out of which the third is ‘asana’.  It defines asana as “Sthiram sukham aasanam” which means, “asana is a steady and comfortable seat.” It is the posture assumed for meditation with one’s ability to sit straight and steady without any back or side support, preferably in sukhasana, padmasana or vajrasana. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 213

“Samadhi means controlling one’s energy. Samadhi is the “upward breath”. The “upward breath” is what is called the “Taraka Brahma”. When the “upward breath” has become perfect, the whole world is within you. This upward breath is the same in all creatures. A Raja yogi is one who has realized the one, indivisible. He is one with God when he is talking or sitting or walking. Raja yoga is like sitting in an upper story and looking around below. “Raja yoga” is so called because it is the king of all yogas. When our intellect becomes one with God, the same is known as Raja yoga. It is all peace; it is formless, qualityless. Bliss has no characteristics whatsoever. This is known as Jeevan Mukti.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Samadhi means controlling one’s energy. Controlling energy means more towards channelling the energy upwards through the sushumna into the higher chakras. Only when energy reaches above the Agna chakra does samadhi happen. So, he says that Samadhi is the “upward breath”. The “upward breath” is what is called the “Taraka Brahma”.

The Parabrahma is also known as Nirguna Brahma, with no quality/attributes, limitless (infinite) in the nondual state. But when it takes form it becomes Saguna Brahma, out of which is born the prakriti, humans and all other species as the outcome of the play of consciousness. But when the play gets out of hand due to the increase of evil and decrease of good, the Nirguna Brahma takes another form to restore dharma (righteousness) and this form is the Taraka Brahma. Shiva, Rama, Krishna, etc were all Taraka Brahma. The Taraka Brahma is powerful and can be considered next to God (Parabrahma). This state has a form but no qualities (like Avadhootas). The Taraka Brahma has the capacity to uplift human consciousness to the state of Nirguna.  Bhagwan hence calls the upward breath as the Taraka Brahma. In the Ananda Sutram, it is mentioned as, ‘Bhava bhavatiitayoh setuh Tarakabrahma’ meaning “The common point bridging together the gross state of saguna and the subtle state of nirguna is called Taraka Brahma.”

He says that when the “upward breath” has become perfect (Taraka Brahma), the whole world is found within you. This upward breath is the same in all creatures, but only a Raja yogi realizes the one, indivisible formless Parabrahman. He becomes one with God when he is talking or sitting or walking. This is the state of Avadhootas. He says Raja yoga is like sitting in an upper story and looking around below. Meaning, detached and in a state of witnesshood. Thus it is called as Raja (king) yoga is so called because it is the king of all yogas. The state of the mind and intellect dissolving and merging in God is known as Raja yoga. He says this state is all peace and that it is formless, qualityless and pure bliss. This bliss has no characteristics whatsoever. This is known as Jeevan Mukti (liberation from the cycle of birth & death).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 214

“Creation disappears in primordial nature. Coming out from this “primordial” is called creation. Entering into it again is called destruction. When you are conscious of the body, and of nothing else, it is “creation”. For Raja-yoga, there is no particular action prescribed. There is no Shiva worship. There is no particular place. All this takes place to a Raja yogi in the brain center. Salutation takes place in the brain center. If one salutes in the brain center, it reaches all.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that creation (maya) disappears in primordial nature (prakruti/nature) . Coming out from this “primordial” is called creation.  Entering into it again is called destruction. Meaning, when out of nothingness (void) when the whole cosmos manifests it is called creation. In the same way when creation dissolves back into that nothingness, it is called destruction.

He says that when you remain conscious only of the body and nothing other than the body, it is creation. Meaning, creation or the prakruti (nature) is only in your reality if you are conscious of it. Body is the manifestation of the prakruti itself, so you are aware of the creation as long as you are conscious of the body. If you awareness is on the subtle instead of the gross, you lose body consciousness and lose consciousness of all the gross nature, thus there is no creation. To the enlightened being who is in turiya (deep samadhi) the creation is destroyed for he is now in the primodial. But to an unawakened man who has no other consciousness other than the body consciousness, creation is the reality.

He says that for those who are on the path of Raj Yoga have no particular formalities or prescribed rules. There is no Shiva worship. There is no particular place to worship. All forms of duality ends and monoism or nonduality begins with Raja Yoga (read more on Raja Yoga in verse 33, 67 & 209). For a Raj Yogi, everything takes place not outside but within –  in the brain center. Even one bows (salutation) in reverence to one’s Istha (diety/god) in the brain center (heart space). He says that if one salutes internally in the brain center, it reaches all. It reaches all because this is the nondual center where the whole creation exists (to know more about the microcosmic and macrocosmic world, see verse 138).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 215

Brahmahood means realization of “oneness” within oneself. Pindanda (microcosm) is that which is visible outside. Brahmanda (macrocosm) is seen inwards. This macrocosm is beyond creation. Creation is a mental condition. Atma is uncreated. Mind has fears of all sorts. All creation appears to exist only to the embodied. When the external is internalized, there is an end of all fear. If you have gold ornaments on your body, you have fear of thieves. Those who have not such ornaments, have no cause for sorrow. They have one sightedness. Desire is in those who see with the physical eye. They see differences. Desire causes a man to work. Desirelessness is Mukti. Desirelessness for fruit is Jeevan Mukti. This is the state of an Avadhoota. This state is a subtle one. Jnyanis have the “internal sight”. They have annihilated the Manas. They experience “one spirit” everywhere. They have no idea of differences. They have realized the one, indivisible. In the gross state, there are differences. The internal breath is not divisible. It is indivisible; it is one.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Brahmahood means realization of “oneness” within oneself. This is the nondual state of realisation of the ultimate truth that all is one. Bhagwan in previous verse has mentioned that the realisation of this oneness is the most supreme. (Read verses 33, 169, 170 & 174).

He says that Pindanda (microcosm) is that which is visible outside. Brahmanda (macrocosm) is seen inwards. Meaning the entire external cosmos (macrocosm) is all reflected within the internal Pindanda (human).  This has been previous explained in great depths in the verse 138.

He says that this macrocosm that is reflected in the microcosm is beyond creation. Creation is only a mental condition, meaning creation is only an influence of the mind. The Atma (soul) cannot be created. The mind projects all sorts of fears. All creation appears to exist only to the embodied (those with body consciousness). He says when the external is internalized, there is an end of all fear. Meaning if one sees and perceives things as external, it is duality. Fear can only exist when there is two. The threat of harm can only be perceived and feared when one sees that something outside but if one perceives everything within, this is nonduality, as everything is in one experiences and thus all fear vanishes. He says that you can have fear of thieves only when you have gold ornaments on your body. Only when things are externalized there is fear. Those who have not such ornaments, have no cause for sorrow. They have one sightedness. For the one-sighted there are no desires, for desires can happen only in those who are in duality. So, he says desire is in those who see with the physical eye. They see differences (duality). Desire causes a man to work. Desirelessness is Mukti (freedom/liberation). Desirelessness for fruit (no expectation for anything) is Jeevan Mukti. This is the state of an Avadhoota. This state is a subtle one. Jnyanis (realised beings) have the “internal sight” because they have annihilated (dissolved) the mind. They experience “one spirit” everywhere . They have no idea of even the minutest of distinction or differences. For them there is no difference between a human and a dog, no difference between mud and gold; but everything appears to them in its reality – the manifestation of the Parabrahman. They are the ones who have realized the one, indivisible. They are in the subtle state. Differences and distinctions are only in the gross state. The internal breath which is the Prana cannot be divided. It is indivisible as this is the same prana that exists in the whole cosmos and the same prana that moves within all living beings.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 216

The idea of grossness is all mental. The “subtle state” is Atmaic. Jnyanis enjoy always “Yoga-nidra”. They are in this state whether they are sitting or walking. Jnyanis may be compared to a tortoise. These animals project their limbs outside only when necessary; at all other times, they keep themselves inside the shell.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the idea of grossness is all mental, that is, in the mind. The “subtle state” is Atmaic (soulful). Jnyanis (self-realised) enjoy always “Yoga-nidra” (subtle sleep). They are in this state whether they are sitting or walking. (For more on ‘yoga nidra’ see verses 10 & 11). Jnyanis may be compared to a tortoise, that project their limbs outside only when necessary; at all other times, they keep themselves inside the shell. Bhagwan refers to the state of Avadhootas and the self-realised who remain constantly absorbed in the ‘subtle sleep’ or samadhi in high states of consciousness, only rarely descending down to earthly consciousness, to serve some earthly purpose.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 217

To the mail train and to the local train, the energy is the same. Time only differs. The Sanyasi is like the mail train. Sanyasi is one who sees the whole external world within himself. One who concentrates his power in the external world, is like the local train. It is difficult to get into the train; after getting into the train, there is no difficulty. One does not then think of the luggage, when we purchase a thing, sitting in the train, our attention is directed towards the train. So also, the first is discrimination; the second is sound. Whatever one may be doing, the attention should be fixed in the head. Seeing, hearing, talking are not actions in themselves; breathing through the nose is an action in reality. What is called “good action” is the downward path.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the power of a mail train and a local train is the same but the time taken to travel the same destination by both the trains are different. In the days of Bhagwan, mail trains were as good as today’s express trains. Mail trains were trains with reservation and known for its speed and punctuality and were given priority over all other trains for uninterrupted travel. The local trains were  short-distance unreserved train that was crowded and slower in movement due to multiple stops in the journey.

Bhagwan compares a Sanyasi’s journey to destination to the speed of the mail (express) train and compares a materialistic person’s journey to destination with the speed of the goods train.  He says that Sanyasi is one who sees the whole external world within himself (nondual) and projects his powers inwardly. On the other hand, he says that the one who concentrates his power in the external world, is like the local train. Because when consciousness is projected outside (duality), it quite obviously gets caught up in the desires and pursuits of the material and these distractions slows the journey. 

He says it is difficult to get into the train; after getting into the train, there is no difficulty. Meaning in the beginning of one’s spiritual journey it may be difficult to get into the path but after getting into the practice of the path, there is no difficulty. He says that after one gets into the train one does not then think of the luggage. While he purchases something, sitting in the train, his attention remains directed towards the train. Meaning once one gets on to the journey then one is not worried of the worldly activities as his attention remains connected with the journey from where he gets the power and detachment to perform his worldly actions.

So he says that the first most important is discrimination and the the second is sound(read verse 122). Meaning, first most important is subtle discrimination which happens when one is centered in the heartspace in the head. Secondary are the sounds (dual activities/worldly activities).  Whatever one may be doing, the attention should be fixed in the head. Meaning, one must on priority be connected to the higher Self and then function in the world. This is what Lord Krishna advised Arjuna “yogastha kuru karmani” meaning to always remain in the state of yoga (merged in the higher Self) while doing all actions in the world.

He then says that seeing, hearing, talking are not actions in themselves but breathing through the nose is an action in reality. Meaning, breathing is most important action as without the breath there is no seeing, hearing or talking. The breath is what connects one to  higher consciousness; hence one must remain focussed on the breath and the other actions will automatically keep happening. Only the breath takes one inward and rest of all the other actions like seeing, hearing, talking are of the 5 senses that keeps one’s attention outside. He says what is called “good action” is the downward path. Meaning, what the world generally considers the actions of the 5 senses as “good action” are actually the ones that pull one more towards the material world – thus he refers to it as the downward path.

This is why in the beginning Bhagwan says that the one who concentrates his power in the external world is like the local train, that delays his journey of ascension. But a Sanyasi, who remains inwardly connected (as the whole external world is within him), is like an express train, moving at much faster pace, with no unnecessary distractions or delays or halts in the journey.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 218

“What is called “silence” refers to the mind, not the tongue. What is done when the Buddhi and Jyana are in communion with the Atman, is not “karma”. Silence is the real locality of the mind; not of the tongue. lt is by silence, yoga is accomplished. He is a yogi who has united into one both Buddhi and Jyana. One who subjects the Manas to Buddhi and makes Buddhi control Manas, is a yogi. What is called “the vow of silence” is another name for the Sushumna which is the junction of the Ida and Pingala. The three important nadis of the body are the Ida and the Pingala and the Sushumna. Sushumna is the seat of the Kundalini.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that what is referred to as “silence” refers actually to the mind and not the tongue. Meaning, what generally is practiced as mouna by observing silence of speech is not the actual silence, but the silencing of the mind is true mouna (silence).

He says that the action performed when the Buddhi and Jyana (intellect and wisdom) are merged in the Self is not ‘karma’. Meaning, when one remains in the state of yoga (see previous verse 217) and performs any action being in that state, the action does not become a karma. This is because when one performs any action while being connected to the divine, there is no intention or expectation for the fruits of that action and hence that action does not become a karma. The action can become a karma only when the action is performed with the outwardly 5 senses, which is bound by the fruits of action, thus creating a consequence for that action (karma).

So, he says that it is by this inner silence that yoga is accomplished. He is a yogi who has united into one both Buddhi and Jyana. (To know more on the merging of Buddhi and Jyana see verse 190). One who subjects the Manas (mind) to Buddhi (intellect) and makes Buddhi control Manas, is a yogi. Multiple times in Chidakasha Gita Bhagwan has been mentioned the importance of the mind to be kept under the vigilance of the intellect. The one, whose intellect is purified develops viveka (ability to discriminate between the real and unreal) and accordingly guides the mind to function, is a yogi. 

He says what is called “the vow of silence” is another name for the Sushumna which is the junction of the Ida and Pingala. The three important nadis of the body are the Ida and the Pingala and the Sushumna. Sushumna is the seat of the Kundalini. Meaning, a true yogi who commits to the vow of silence actually turns inward and contemplates on the junction of Ida, Pingala and Sushumna, which is the heart space in the head (agna chakra). When the Kundalini that is in its seat of sushumna rises to this intersection of the Ida, Pingala and Sushumna, the yogi enters into the true state of silence.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 219

All Tatwas have one root Tatwa called “Parabrahma”. When this is realized, it is called Jeevan Mukti. You must see the river at its source and not after it merges into the sea. You should see the mother root of a tree. All the trees have one mother root. So also, all have one and only one God. When you have realized all as one homogeneous, this realization is Mukti.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that all tattvas have one root tattva called “Parabrahma”. Meaning, it is from the root of the Supreme Consciousness (Parabrahma) that all elements (tattvas) of creation have birthed. He says when this ultimate truth is realised it is the state of self-realisation (jeevan mukti).

He says that you must see the river at its source and not after it merges into the sea. Meaning, one must contemplate not on the branches (creation) but on the root (Source of creation). He says you should see the mother root of a tree. All the trees have one mother root. So also, all have one and only one God. When you have realized all as one homogeneous, this realization is Mukti. Meaning, anything and everything you see in this cosmos is a manifestation of that Supreme consciousness (God). It is only when one realises this truth that all distinctions and separations of duality cease to exist and one realises that every individual and object in this world is from the same source. This state of realisation is liberation (mukti).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 220

The actors in a drama, first of all, perform a trial behind the curtain and then perform it on the stage. So also, is the performance of yoga; first of all, it is secretly practiced and when it is accomplished, it gets publicity of its own accord. When you begin to learn an art, you do not have experience of it all at once. The more you practice, the better will be your experience of it.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the actors in a drama practice first in privacy and once they have mastered their role, they go and perform publicly on the stage.  In the same way, sadhna is first practiced in privacy and when it accomplished, without any publicity, it becomes known to the world on its own. He says that when you begin to learn an art, you do not have experience of it all at once. The more you practice, the better will be your experience of it. Similarly, one who walks the path will not experiences its fruits immediately or all at once. It takes time to ripen and the more you practice the better will your experience be.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 221

One’s hunger is not appeased by simply smelling the food cooked. One must take the food himself, to satisfy his hunger. So also, the experience is the only accomplishment. There is no body to oppose you when you have experienced, “truth”. By simply holding sugar in your hand, you cannot experience its sweetness. Sugar must be placed in the mouth to taste its sweetness. This is experience. Book knowledge gives room for doubts and discussion. But self experience does not. Experience for oneself is like the command of the king to the subjects. Experience is like the king’s command; book knowledge is the subjects. What is called “Jeevan Mukti” is one’s “true home”, the aim and end of yoga. This is the thing to be attained. The dwelling in the cave is “the thing” to be accomplished in life. The cave is the Buddhi; when Jeevatma learns to dwell in the Buddhi, the aim of life is realized. The heart space which is the place of dwelling (cave) of the Atman is the place of the third eye. By discrimination a woman becomes a man; by lack of discrimination a man becomes a woman. The outer body and its functions are only different; the subtle in them is the same. If in a woman Buddhi and Jyana have become one, she becomes a man. Water comes out of a tap whether the screw is turned by male or a female. To bhakti there is no distinction between a male and a female. Male and the female are physical distinctions only. Jyanis have no such difference. Shiva and Shakti are same in the male and the female.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that one’s hunger is not appeased by simply smelling the food cooked but one must himself eat the food to satisfy the hunger. Similarly, one cannot realise the truths on the path by reading or gaining knowledge about them, but one must directly experience the truth. First-hand experience is the real accomplishment. You speak and act genuinely from your own experiences and then nobody can oppose you when you have directly experienced the truth. The conviction comes from the experience. You cannot experience the truth by bookish knowledge just like you cannot experience the sweetness of the sugar just by simply holding sugar in your hand, how much ever you may be explained what sweetness is like. To experience sweetness, the sugar must be placed in the mouth and tasted.

He says book knowledge gives room for doubts and discussion, but not the experience of the Self. He says that personal experience is like the command of the king to the subjects, where experience is like the king’s command and book knowledge is the subjects. The ones who have experienced what sugar is like has certainly command over the ones who have only read what sugar is like.

He says, what is called jeevan mukti (liberation) is one’s “true home” and this is the real aim and end goal of yoga. This is what must be aspired to attain. He says that the dwelling in the cave is the goal to be achieved in life, where the cave is the Buddhi. He says that  when the Jeevatma learns to dwell in the Buddhi, the aim of life is realized. Meaning, when the Yogi now can stabilise and dwell in the cave of the intellect and dissolve all nonduality, the purpose of human life is achieved. He says the heart space is the place of dwelling (cave) of the Atman (soul), which is the place of the third eye.

He says that by subtle discrimination a woman becomes a man. Meaning, to “become a man” is not by external features alone but the “real man” is the one who develops subtle discrimination.  If a man lacks subtle discrimination, he is then, in fact, a woman. This is because it is only the external body and functions that are different, but the subtle in them is the same. (Read more on this in verse 61). The outer body and its functions are only different; the subtle in them is the same.  If in a woman Buddhi and Jyana have become one, she becomes a man. (To know more on the merging of Buddhi and Jyana see verse 190). 

He says that water comes out of a tap whether the screw is turned by male or a female. To bhakti (one who has developed indistinctive unconditional universal love) there is no distinction between a male and a female. Meaning, the tap water will flow once the knob is turned open, irrespective of whether a male or a female turned it. He says that male and female are physical distinctions only. The Jyanis (self-realised) have no such difference because it is the same Shiva and Shakti that is present in both the male and the female.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 222

Gold does not make a man great.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that gold does not make a man great. Meaning, it is not by wealth, power, fame, glory, status that man becomes great, but he becomes great by the realisation of his highest purpose of human life – to develop subtle discrimination (self-realisation).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 223

“Through science the bondage of karma is not cut through.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that having the greatest knowledge of even the most advanced science, no science can help in relieving one’s karmas that keeps one stuck in bondage of the cycle of birth and death. Only by realising the Self can one absolve karma through the science of the Self.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 224

O Beggar! Burn the delusion of the mind in the fire of yoga! Those who have not realized the Brahman do not know the truth. They do not experience real joy. Egotistic tendencies are not destroyed. Be always immersed in Ananda. Bury your desire in the depth of your Manas. Desire is fruitless. Destroy it internally.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan exclaims “O Beggar!”  because until one has not burnt the delusion of the mind in the fire of yoga, desires will continue to  keep one always seeking something or the other here and there. He is comparing the endless pleads, prayers and cajoling of man from life for the fulfilment of some or the other desires at all times to begging.  He says that those who haven’t realised their Self or the Brahman (Supreme) have not yet known the truth, the reality. They haven’t yet known of the falseness of the worldly glitter and entrapments, and so they do not experience the real joy. In ignorance they keep seeking temporary happiness in temporary things of the world. The egotistic tendencies continue to dominate their lives as they remain not destroyed. He advises to stay immersed in the bliss of the Self. In that state the desires burry in the depth of the mind.  In this verse he is stern to remind that desires are fruitless and advises that it must be destroyed internally.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 225

When Jeeva lead the Shiva Shakti in man internally to the center of the brain (Brahma Randhra) and there becomes one with Shiva, the indivisible, Mukti is realized. Brahmananda is for him who has attained this Mukti. Always concentrate on Shiva. In the beginning, was Shiva. In the beginning, there was Shiva Shakti alone. The Great Protector is the eternal Ananda. The great desirelessness is the eternal Ananda. He who is without desire, is without the three qualities (Gunas). That is real virtue. You are the king of yourself. You are the lord of Mukti. Look within yourself. The real form is the human form. Man stands at the head of the animal kingdom. In this world, there is nothing higher than man. It is man that has created all the countries.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when the Jeeva (individual soul) leads Shiva’s Shakti (kundalini) from the lower chakras (lower states of consciousness) to the center of the brain (Brahmarandhra) and there becomes one with Shiva, the indivisable Supreme consciousness in the Sahasrara chakra), one attains Mukti (liberation). Brahmananda (eternal bliss) is for him who has attained this Mukti (liberation). He says to always concentrate on Shiva (keep the Shiva or Supreme consciousness in your awareness). He says that only the Supreme consciousness (Shiva) was there in the beginning, in which is hidden the Shakti. It is from the Shiva that Shakti manifested as prakruti (creation) and just was even the Jeeva (individual soul) formed. The individual souls kept moving downwards into more grosser consciousness as karmic influences increased. This verse reminds of the reverse journey now with the process of the Jeeva awakening and raising this Shakti back to higher states of consciousness and merging it back with Shiva, which is the state of unification with the Supreme, the liberation from suffering and achieving the state of permanent bliss. He says the great protector is this eternal bliss (ananda). This state is the great state of desirelessness. He says that the one without desires is the one who has transcended the 3 gunas and become nirguna, which is the real virtue. He reminds that you (the Self) are the king of yourself and you are the lord of Mukti. So it is important to look within yourself. He adds that the real form is the human form and not the animal form because man stands at the head of the animal kingdom. He says that in this world, there is nothing higher than man, for the whole lot of countries with all its advancement including the boundaries and diversities are all the creation of man.  Bhagwan reminds man of the true purpose of incarnating in the human body – liberation, for liberation is possible through this human incarnation only and not any other form has this privilege. The purpose of Bhagwan’s Chidakasha Gita is a very obvious reminder to the world.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 226

“He is a Brahmin who has experienced Brahmananda. Your Maya (delusion) is transient. O Hari! Burn the ego! One who has destroyed the Manas has destroyed Maya. Hari (Maya) is not the lord; Shiva is the Lord. All know that butter is latent in milk. When we boil milk, butter must be obtained. Those who take butter are very few. Milk is Bhakti. Heating milk on fire is the power of discrimination. The vessel for discrimination is Buddhi. The fire of discrimination is the fire of yoga. By this Viveka fire (discrimination), the six enemies of the body – anger, desire, envy, passion, avarice, delusion are destroyed and the butter obtained.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the one who has experienced Brahmananda (eternal bliss) is a true brahmin. He says all your Maya (happiness in or of the world) is impermanent and transient. He exclaims “O Hari! Burn the ego!” With Hari, he is referring to the temporary illusionary creations of maya that is caused by ego. The world comes into existence only when ego is born. Ego is born from the mind. So he says that the one who has destroyed the Manas (mind) has destroyed Maya. He says Hari (maya) is not the lord but Shiva is the Lord.(for clarity on this read verse 118)

He says that we all know that butter is hidden in milk and cannot be seen in the milk. But by boiling  the milk butter can be obtained, but then those who take the butter are very few, he says.  Meaning, the supreme is pervading in everything in this world. Shiva (butter) is present in the Hari (milk) but only few are able to extract the butter (Shiva) out of milk (Hari). He refers to milk as bhakti (devotion). He calls the heating process of the milk on fire as the power of discrimination (viveka). The vessel for discrimination he refers to as Buddhi (intellect). He says this fire of discrimination is result of the fire of yoga. By this viveka fire (power of discrimination through the intellect), the 6 enemies (anger, desire, envy, passion, avarice, delusion) within the human are destroyed and only then the butter can be obtained.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 227

Without oil, a lamp cannot burn. So also, without “breath”, the body cannot move. Without a helm, a boat cannot be steered to its destination. A steamer is steered by steam energy and by the intelligence of the captain. A boat cannot go like a steamer. Similarly, a Sanyasi is like a steamer. He who has the whole world, in himself, is like a steamer. He who is in the world, is like the boat. The guiding light of a steamer is on the top; similarly is the Brahma Randra to a Sanyasi. Mind in a Sanyasi is merged in the heart space. What is light is Sanyasi. A cow cannot run like a horse. He whose mind is merged in the Self is like the horse. He whose mind is in the world is like the cow. All cannot become kings at the same time. All cannot be traders at the same time. Customers are also required.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just like a lamp cannot burn without oil, so also the body cannot move without ‘breath’ (prana). Without a helm (the wheel to steer the  boat), a boat cannot be steered to its destination. A steamer is steered by steam energy and by the intelligence of the captain. He is referring the steam energy to breath (prana) and the intelligence of the caption is being referred to the buddhi (intellect). Similarly, a Sanyasi is like a steamer, because the one who has the whole world within himself, is like a steamer. He who is in the world is like the boat. Thus he says that a boat cannot move like a steamer. He says that the guiding light on the top of a steamer is similar to the Brahma Randra (in the sahasrara) of a Sanyasi. The mind in a Sanyasi is always merged in the heart space. The light of consciousness of the heart space is the divine light of the Sanyasi. He says that a cow (worldly man) cannot run like a horse (sanyasi). The one whose mind is merged in the Self is like the horse and the one whose mind is in the world is like the cow. He says that all cannot become kings at the same time and that neither can all become traders at the same time. Meaning, all cannot become Sanyasis at the same time and neither can all become only worldly at the same time. He says customers are also required. Meaning, seekers also are needed to whom guidance and support can be given by the self-realised, thus all boats have the opportunity to become a steamer.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 228

When you walk in darkness, you have fear. But in light, there is no fear. Ignorance is darkness. Knowledge is the light. Guru is such a light. Light is guru.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when you walk in darkness, you have fear. But in light, there is no fear. Ignorance is darkness which vanishes with the divine light of the divine wisdom. Guru is such a light and light is the guru. In Sanskrit, ‘guru’ means literally dispeller of darkness. Thus when you are in the divine light of the Guru, there is no fear.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 229

In perfect sleep, men forget everything. Suppose you walk ten miles and then sleep. You are quite unaware of your existence in this world. So also, when you are hungry, you must satisfy your hunger by taking food yourself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that in perfect (deep) sleep, men forget everything. Suppose you walk ten miles and then sleep, the sleep will be so deep that you are become unaware of your existence in this world. The “you”, the “your problems”, the “your name, status and achievements” – all just vanish and this is the state when the awareness (the real you) experiences itself. (more details in depth about the different states of human consciousness can be read in verse 10). Bhagwan says that so also, when you are hungry, you must satisfy your hunger by taking food yourself. Meaning, if you are hungry for liberation, you must yourself walk the path.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 230

“Just as there are the gutters (storm drains) on both sides of the road for the water to flow freely, so also, you must allow the breath to take an upward course freely. It requires great effort to carry a stone upwards. But without the least effort on our part, it suddenly comes down. Similarly is concentration. It is easy to take birth; but it is very difficult to leave this body. We must discover the source of a river. After it joins the sea, there is no use in seeing the river. To a tree, its mother root is the most important; all other roots are subsidiary. When we raise a chair, our breath goes upwards. That is the seat of Prana. When we are cooking flames of fire have an upward course; so also, the smoke takes an upward course. In the lighted chimney, the course of the heated air is upwards. Similarly, in the heart space, the course of breath is upwards. Our joy is caused by the motion of the air (Vayu). Without this air motion, there is no blood circulation. When a water canal is dammed, the motion of water has come to an end. So also, in this body, such a dam is – Vatha, Pitha, and Kapha (three humors of Tridoshas).”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the upward breath in humans must be allowed to move freely and deeply, as freely as water flows in the gutters (storm drains).  He says that it requires lot of efforts to carry a stone upwards but with very little effort it can be brought down. Similar is concentration too. It is difficult to keep the mind raised up to to higher consciousness but very easy for the mind run downwards toward the lower desires.

He says it is easy to take birth; but it is very difficult to leave this body. Meaning, birth happens because of desires and that pulls down the soul into the body easily but due to the unfulfilled desires and deep attachments to life and its clinging, one finds it very difficult to leave the body.

He says that we must discover the source of a river. After it joins the sea, there is no use in seeing the river. Meaning we must not get stuck in the diversities of multiple rivers but rather stay focussed on the source of the river. After the rivers join the sea, it is of no use tracking rivers. Similarly, our focus must not be in the diversities of relgions, paths, culture, countries, etc but we must focus on the source from where it all came from – the Parabrahman. When all these merge back into the same source of the nondual infinite it is then useless to track the dualities of it. So to a tree, its mother root is the most important; all other roots are of least importance. Similarly, the source is what must be important for the seeker to be focussed upon and not the manifestations of the Source.

He says that just before we are about to lift any object, our breath goes upwards, and that is because the seat of Prana is above in the heart space in the head. He refers the same to the cooking flames that rise upward and so does the smoke. In the lighted chimney also, the course of the heated air is upwards. Similarly, in the heart space, the course of breath is upwards.

He says that our joy is caused by the motion of the air in the body. Without this air motion, there is no blood circulation. When a water canal is dammed, the motion of water has come to an end. So also, in this body, such a blockage is – Vatha, Pitha, and Kapha (three humors of Tridoshas). Meaning, the prana is in constant movement and circulation and when there is good flow of prana, one is healthy and experiences the joys from the upper surge of energies (prana). But if there are blockages in the channels the flow  of prana is restricted which causes imbalances in the body, which are known as the tridoshas, like Vatha dosha, pitta dosha and kapha dosha.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 231

“Head is the seat where the smell of musk, sandal-paste, camphor and concentrated camphor is experienced. Ants swarm at the place where there is sugar. Where the sound of Omkar is experienced, there is no ignorance. That which is seen by the spiritual eye is the real heart. That which is seen by the physical eye is not the real heart. The greatest is the head. The origin of breath is true Ananda. The real Ananda is in the cavity of the heart. The house of breath is the dwelling of Kundalini. This is the house of Shiva. This is our real happy home of peace. This is the home of Satwa guna. One who lives in this house, does not care for honor and dishonor. This is the home of a yogi who has renounced everything. This is the home of those who have the power of subtle discrimination. This is the home of Kundalini. This home is the heart home.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that head is the seat where all the divine smells like the smell of musk, sandal-paste, camphor and concentrated camphor is experienced. He says that ants swarm at the place where there is sugar. He is referring the ants to the smells (and other mystical experiences) and the sugar to the seat in the center of the head (Sahasrara).  When the Kundalini shakti reaches and abides in the Sahasrara, the pineal gland is known to oozes out the sweet amrit (nectar/elixir). All mystical or divine experiences concentrate at the heart space like ants swarm at the place where there is sugar. The heart space is where the sound of Omkar is experienced and he says at the place where Omkar is experienced there is no ignorance. All ignorance dissolves here as the divine light of wisdom dawns and all darknes dissolves in the divine light.

He says that which is seen by the spiritual eye (third eye/pineal gland/heart space) is the real heart and that is why Bhagwan calls it the ‘heart space. He thus says that, that which is seen by the physical eye is not the real heart. The physical eye can only see the gross but the inner eyes (when activated) sees the subtle. The greatest and highest is thus all in the head.

He says that origin of breath, which is in the cavity of the heart (heart space in the head), is true source of Ananda (bliss). He says that this house of breath is the dwelling of Kundalini, where the Kundalini Shakti finally rests, in the house of Shiva (Sahasrara). This is our real happy home of peace and the home of Satwa guna. (For insights on ‘gunas’ see verse 55). He says one who lives in this house, does not care for honor and dishonor. Meaning, the one whose Kundalini rises and abides in this nondual home space of Sahasrara, have transcended all gunas and hence remain unaffected by the dualities such as honor and dishonour. That is why he calls this as the home of a yogi who has renounced everything. So, he asserts that this is the home of those who have the power of subtle discrimination and that this is the home of Kundalini and that this home is the home of the heart.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 232

“Those who do not concentrate on breath have no aim, no state, no intelligence and no fulfilment. So, concentrate and think. Concentrate on in drawing and outgoing breath. Draw the breath in properly. Breathe, concentrating on the sound the breath produces. Concentrate on the sound which is produced internally. Have faith in the internal sound and breathe. Breathe in. Breathe deeper and deeper. Breathe in so that the internal sound may be audible to the ears. Do not think of anything else. Eating and drinking, coming and standing and eating, these do not elevate the soul. Cook for yourself; do not desire to eat what others have cooked. O Mind! Do what you do with faith.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who do not concentrate on breath have no aim, no state, no intelligence and no fulfilment. Meaning, those who do not remain aware of their breath have no aim – because they have strayed away from the main aim of life because when they are aware of breath, they will remain centered, in awareness and connected to the source and their true self. If not aware of their breath the mind will easily be lost in the outwardly pursuits and temporary gains of life and not the real goal of life. When one is not aware of breath, he says there is no intelligence, no higher wisdom of is real and what is unreal and can get caught up in the unreal (maya). If one is not aware of the breath he says there is no fulfilment, because mind will constantly seek fulfilment in the temporary.

So, he says concentrate and think. Concentrate on the incoming breath and the outgoing breath. He asks to draw the breath in properly (slow and deep) and to become aware of the sound that the breath produces externally and to become aware of the sound produced internally. He asks to trust and follow the internal sound and breathe and let every breath become deeper and deeper. He asks to breathe in such a way that the internal sound can be heard by the ears. He asks not to think of anything else during this process and to not let the thoughts of eating and drinking and other such futile things which do not elevate your soul, to distract you. He says cook for yourself; do not desire to eat what others have cooked. Meaning, experience all the wisdom directly yourself and not simply crave for what is in other’s wisdom or experience. He then says commands the mind, “O Mind! Do what you do with faith.” Meaning, be fully absorbed and focussed on this breathwork with full faith in the working of the cosmic intelligence of the breath.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 233

Round a leafless tree, wind blows in vain (there is no response). In a dead body, there is no air (Prana); no sound. Without air, an animal can never live in this world.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the wind keeps blowing on a leafless tree in vain without getting any response from the tree – because it is a dead tree.  Similarly, in a dead body because there is no air (prana) there is no sound and thus no response. He stresses that without prana an animal can never live in this world. No life is possible without prana. This verse stresses on the importance of prana, that is, breath.

Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 234

“The engine (body) does not move without steam (Prana). A coconut tree does not yield jack fruits. What one talks without experience, is in vain. The judge and the magistrate hear what the plaintiff and the defendant say and form an idea of the case. But they do not know the truth of the case. It is not enough if YOU have sugar in your hand; you must taste it to know its sweetness. Although there is water in the bowels of the earth, we must dig a well in order to get the water. The main thing is the internal practice and the union of Prana with Parabrahma in the center of the brain. This is seeing God face to face; this is the fulfilment of yoga; this is the eternal peace.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the engine (body) does not move without steam (Prana) and that a coconut tree does not yield jack fruits. Meaning, one cannot preach what one does not experience.  Whatever one talks without experience is of no use.  He says that it is only forming an idea but no direct experience of it. Like, in the court of law, the judge and the magistrate listen to what the accuser and the defendant have to say and then form an idea on the case.  But they still do not know the truth directly. He says holding the sugar in your hands is not enough to know what sweetness is but in order to know what sweetness is, one must taste it. He says that there surely is water in beneath the earth, but in order to get the water, wells must be dug. Similarly, to experience the supreme, one must practice the internal breathwork and merging of prana with the supreme in the center of the brain (sahasrara). This is seeing God face to face (experiencing god) and this is the final goal of yoga where one attains eternal peace.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 235

There is no prescribed food for a neophyte. Peace is the food for the practicer. The highest of all arts is the Brahma Vidya (art of self-realisation). Such an art cannot be bought for money. It isn’t obtained by honor or dishonor. It is not obtained by the outer fame. It is acquired only by unwavering devotion (Bhakti). Without Bhakti, there is no liberation from bondage. Mukti is attained by a man only by the subtle Bhakti. Brahmananda is not empty talk but solid experience. This is the same as Satchidananda. This is acquired by the unceasing practice. All is Brahmananda to one who has realized.

 INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that there is no prescribed food for a neophyte and that peace is the food for the practicer. Meaning, there is no prescribed path for a beginner on the path of truth and light, but whatever brings peace to the seeker is the path.  He says that the highest of all arts is the Brahma Vidya (art of self-realisation). He says that such an art cannot be bought for money. It can also neither be obtained by worldly honor or dishonor nor by any kind of worldly fame. But it can be only acquired by an unwavering devotion, meaning unwavering faith in oneself (perseverance).

He says that without devotion, there is no liberation from bondage and that mukti (liberation) is attained only by the subtle devotion (universal love). It may be reminded that by ‘bhakti’ Bhagwan refers to devotion and love for others and he stresses that true devotion is not the love for selective beings only but universal love towards one and all without any discrimination. More details on ‘bhakti’ can be found in verse 44).

He says that Brahmananda (bliss attained by the merging of one’s consciousness with supreme consciousness) is not empty talk but solid experience. This is the same as Satchidananda, which is acquired by the unceasing practice. All is blissful (Brahmananda) to one who has realized the Self.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 236

“O Mind! Banish the idea of “duality”; have subtle discrimination. Having abandoned the idea of duality, think that the visible universe is all Shiva, the spotless. There is no disguise. Have everything within you. That which is permanent is faith. O Mind! Control the breath. Have internal life. Discover the truth by means of subtle discrimination. That which is related to subtle discrimination is eternal. The essence of every creature is eternal joy. Acquire eternal joy. What is eternal Ananda is eternal Mukti. The mental seats (posture) are the thrones of kings. The eternal seat is the eternal joy. When Sat and Chit are united. The same is Paramananda. The same is called Chaitanyananda.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

The mind is everything. Life happens, experience happens, only through the mind. It is the mind that thinks, creates and then experiences it. All good and bad, all pleasure and pain is possible only if the mind is active. That is why the whole existence, experiences all exist as long as mind exists when one is awake. The moment mind goes to sleep, everything just vanishes (in deep sleep state). Mind is the cause and mind is the effect. In the Chidakasha Gita, Bhagwan often exclaims or talks to the mind in an assertive manner, so as to stress on how one must learn to command the mind and be the master of the mind rather than being a slave to it. In this verse, he seemingly is commanding or instructing or asserting the truth to the mind by exclaiming “O Mind!”

He instructs the mind to banish all the ideas of duality and instead practice subtle discrimination. Then having abandoned the idea of duality, he asks the mind to begin thinking that the whole visible universe as Shiva, the pure, spotless and eternal. He asks the mind thus to see god or the supreme in everyone and everything. He asks the mind to  overlook all the disguises under which the creator is pervading. He asks the mind to hold everything within itself because faith means having this permanent experience.  He directs the mind to have control over the breath (prana) and thus have internal life. He instructs the mind/intellect to discover the truth by means of subtle discrimination because that which is related to subtle discrimination is eternal. He asks the mind to acquire eternal joy because the essence of every creature (living being) is eternal joy  and this eternal joy is nothing but eternal mukti (liberation).  He says that being seated (rooted) in the mind is as royal as seat or throne of the kings, thus experiencing eternal joy at this place when the Sat and Chit are united. The same eternal bliss is Paramananda and also called Chaitanyananda.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 237

“All creation is mental. The body is nothing but a means to an end. Shakti is of the Atman. The highest tower is in the head.This is the seat of the Atman. This is the sky of consciousness. This is the greatest support. The “Ajna” (the sixth lotus of the body) is the support.The seat of Kundalini is the heart sky. What is travelling in a train, is the thought of the Atman. The mail train is the Hatha yogi. The local train is the Raja yogi. (The acquisition of peace is happiness). The difference is only in time. Although the velocity is the same, time differs. This difference is the delusion of the mind.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that all creation are illusions of the mind. The body is nothing but a means to an end. Shakti is of the Atman. Meaning, the body is only the tool to achieve liberation from karma, the main power (shakti) is not of the body but the Atman (soul). He says that the highest tower is in the head (Sahasrara) and this is the seat of the Atman, which is the sky of consciousness. This is the greatest support to the seeker. He adds that the Ajna chkra is the support, which is the seat of Kundalini which he refers to as the heart sky (Chidakasha).

He says that what is travelling in a train, is the thought of the Atman. Meaning being connected with the soul is like travelling in a train – faster. He says that the mail train is the Hatha yogi and the local train is the Raja yogi. The difference is only in time. Although the velocity is the same, time differs. This difference is the delusion of the mind. Meaning, both these trains travel at the same speed but yet they reach at different timings. This delusion of trains have same speed but yet reaching the destination at different timings is the delusion of the mind. Read why below.

Additional Notes

In verse 217, it was already mentioned that the local train takes more time because of the more number of stops/halts but the express train has very few stops and the railways always give priority to express trains by making way for it over other trains. Similarly, the seeker whose focus is inward is like travelling in a train and the one whose focus is outward (materialistic) is like travelling in a local train, indulging in more stops and detours due to the distractions of the world. This he calls as the delusion of the mind. Read verse 217 for more clarity.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 238

A man’s birth is from his parents. He is first a child; he grows to manhood and himself becomes the parent of children. The difference is due to time. The nature of the child is according to the thought entertained by the parents when they are in union. If the parents entertain devotion, mischief, wrath, activity, desire, etc. at the time of union, the child born to them will imbibe the same qualities. Creation is caused by Vayu’s entrance in the womb. If the parents at the time of union have worldly or celestial inclination, the child born will have the same inclination. When the child has the latter inclination, it will soon be enlightened. The first essential is desirelessness, after birth. The destruction of the seed of birth and death comes next. When a man is subjected to repeated sorrows, he must see the “light” after the exercise of subtle discrimination. What is called “Apana Vayu” is the destruction of creation. “Apana Vayu” and the “Prana Vayu” must be merged in the Atman. When these two are united, all conditions are annihi- lated. Before the expiration of Prana, one must attain Mukti. Then it becomes one, indivisible, losing its duality.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that a man’s birth is from his parents. Meaning, an individual is born from the characteristics of his/her parents. He says that the man is first a child, then he grows to an adult and then himself becomes the parent of children. The only difference between these two stages is time. He says that the nature of the child will be according to the thoughts entertained by the parents when they are in sexual union. At the time of this union, whatever thoughts, emotions and feelings the parents hold (devotion, mischief, wrath, activity, desire, etc.) is what the nature of the child is going to be. (Read additional notes below for details).

He says that creation is caused by Vayu’s (prana) entrance in the womb. If the parents at the time of union have worldly or celestial inclination, the child that is born will have the same inclination. A child with such divine inclination will soon be enlightened. But for that, the first priority need after birth is desirelessness in the child. In other words it simply means that then desirelessness must be the quality of the parents first, in order to beget such a child. The next essential need is the destruction of the seed of birth and death, which happens through the spiritual practices that is practiced throughout life.

He says that when a man is subjected to repeated sorrows, he must see the “light” after the exercise of subtle discrimination. Meaning, only when one undergoes repeated sorrows through various life incidents, through subtle discrimination, he sees some greater cause beyond it all incident and thus sees the true ‘light’.

He says what is called “Apana Vayu” is the destruction of creation. “Apana Vayu” is responsible for exhalation, helping exhale out all impurities from the body/mind, thus destroying desires. He thus says it is the destruction of creation. “Prana Vayu” is responsible for inhalation. Bhagwan says that the Apana Vayu (exhalation)  and the Prana Vayu (inhalation) must be merged in the Atman. When these two are united, all conditions are annihilated. Uniting of the two vayus happens through the process of Sushumna breathing, where the seeker raises the prana to the highest chakra (mentioned many times in Chidakasha Gita). He says that before the expiration of prana (before one’s death), one must attain Mukti (liberation). Then it becomes one, indivisible, losing its duality. (For deep insights into the “Prana Vayu” & “Apana Vayu” see verse 121)

Additional Notes

How do parents and souls attract each other?

You actually choose your parents depending on your karmas. Depending on what soul lessons are needed to be learnt by the soul, the soul chooses it’s geographical location of birth where it will further attract the people and life situations as per the pending or incomplete karmas from previous lives. This is how it chooses those parents through which it will learn whatever is suitable karmically for its life journey on earth by experiencing all that it was due for. So, parents will attract the soul that is karmically aligned with what they also need to learn and work it out.  So, the dominant nature of karma (greed, anger, hatred, revenge, rage or kindness, love, divinity, devotion, purity) of the parents is what will influence the minds of the parents during the sexual act, and accordingly they will attract a soul of similar nature. The other way round, the soul that is seeking birth also has karmic structure, from which the soul also carries impressions and tendencies (vasanas) soul, and it will thus get attracted to couples holding similar vibes and thus get born through them. This is one reason why my Gurudev stressed strongly that married couples must themselves with spiritual practices and purify to the maximum before even attempting to conceive a child. With this couples can choose to bring in a soul of higher consciousness.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 239

“Upanayana is the goal of life. “Upa” means “near”. Jeevatma must be merged in the Paramatma. Upanayana is internal. Upanayana is the subtle. What is called “Upadhi” is the “third eye”. The object to be attained is to be near God. What is Upanayana is not the body idea. It is the thought of the Atman. In this world, he who has performed such “Upadhi” is a Brahmin. “Upadhi” is the Sushumna nerve. It is the “Brahma Nadi” where gods and goddesses dwell.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that Upanayana is the goal of life, where “Upa ” means “near” and “nayana” means “eye”. For information, ‘upanayana ceremony’ is the thread ceremony performed in Brahmins. See verse 116 for more on this.

He says that jeevatma (soul) must be merged in the Paramatma (god/supreme). He defines upanayana more of an internal aspect than any external ritual. He says upanayana is the subtle. What is called upadhi” is the third eye. The objective is to be near God. He says upanayana has nothing really to do with the body but actually the thought of the Atman. He says that whoever in this world has performed such an internal subtle “Upadhi” is a Brahmin. He calls upadhi the Sushumna nerve, the “Brahma Nadi” where gods and goddesses dwell.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 240

Shabda (sound) is generated in Akash (space). That which is generated in space is life energy. What is called Akash (a space) is in the head. Akash is heart space. Life energy is one only.Just as there is difference between a river and the sea, so also, there is difference between Jeevatman and Param atman. It is one of degree, not of kind. One must not think as “I” and “mine”. This is the cause of next birth. That man is of little intelligence who thinks in terms of “I” and “mine”. By so thinking, he descends into lower birth. The energy in the sun appears as light. Likewise, there is an energy in the form of light in a gas light. To those who have lost the difference between day and night, the light of the sun and that of the gas light are the same. There is no difference between the two. One’s faith is the greatest thing. Above faith, there is no God. In this world there is nothing higher than faith, man, devoid of faith, cannot be deceived by the wicked tricks of others. Man enjoys that in which he has his faith. The internal faith should be concentrated upon breath. Those who have no faith have no thoughts of anything. Those who have no faith have no regard for Sadhus and Sanyasis. They think (wrongly) that thousands of Sadhus are merged in them.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content41

Bhagwan says that Shabda (sound) is generated in Akash (space) and that which is generated in space is life energy (prana). But then he reminds that this external “space” is only the reflection the internal “space”, which is in the head and called as the heart space (Chidakasha).

He says that life energy (prana) is one only. The ego gives the illusion of separateness. Just as there is an illusion of difference between a river and the sea, so also, there is the illusion of a difference between Jeevatman and Paramatman. So he reminds that one must be aware of this truth and not consider living in the “I” and “mine” because then this becomes the cause of next birth. Ego is the cause of rebirths and when the ego dissolves all bondages dissolve with it and thus one is liberated from the cycle of birth and death. He says that the man who thinks in terms of “I” and “mine” is of little intelligence. By so thinking, he actually is descending into lower births.

He says that it is the energy in the sun that appears as light. Similarly, there is an energy in the form of light in a gaslight (of gas-lamp). He says that the ones who have lost the difference between day and night are the liberated beings to whom there is no difference between the light of the sun and the light of the gas-lamp because in reality there is no difference between the two, just like there is no difference between sunlight and moonlight. Moonlight is nothing but the reflected light of sun but to the human eye it appears that both are separate.

He says that the greatest above everything is one’s faith. Above faith, there is no God. He says that in this world there is nothing higher than faith. The one who has firm faith cannot be deceived by the wicked tricks of others. Noone can lead one astray or fool the one who has immense faith. By faith, he is referring to whatever one has strong faith in – thus he says that man enjoys that in which he has his full faith. So, this refers to one’s faith in oneself, in one’s practice, in one’s Master, in one’s path – whichever it is, the faith must be firm. He talks of the biggest faith, which is the internal faith concentrated upon one’s breath (within the Sushumna Nadi). He adds that those who have no faith are unable to discriminate between their own real and unreal thoughts. They thus are unable to have respect or regards for Sadhus and Sanyasis, because they are unable to see any difference between an ignorant human and a human of awakened consciousness. They think (wrongly) that thousands of Sadhus are merged in them, meaning they think even the Sadhus are ones among them (the ignorant).

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 241

“To a blind man there is no difference between day and night. To him, external light is of no use. In him, the light of Jnyan is strong. To the blind, their bodily form is of no use. As their physical eyes do not see, their spiritual eye must be very effective. Blind men cannot describe the form of a carriage by feeling it with touch.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that to a blind man there is no difference between day or night because to the blind, the external light is of no use. He is comparing the blind to the liberated beings for whom there is no distinction even between the day and night – everything is the same to them because they have dissolved all these illusory differences. But he says that in them, the light of Jnyan (inner wisdom) is strong. To them even their bodily form is of no use because they do not remain anymore in body consciousness. He says that since their physical eyes do not function, their spiritual eye become very effective. This quality can be observed in the blind. When one of their 5 senses (eyesight) does not function, the other senses become more active like they develop very sharp hearing abilities and so do they develop their sixth sense (intuition). Thus he says that blind men would be unable to describe by touch how a carriage looks than what their sixth sense would tell them. The liberated ones thus rely on their inner sight than the external eyes. There is nothing hidden from their inner sight.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 242

Is the sound generated from the world or is the world generated from the sound? Is the effect from the cause or the cause from the effect? The world is generated from the sound. From the sound is generated the form, and the world which has form. From the cause is the effect. Whence is the cause? The cause and the effect are from the Self. Cause and effect must be the slaves of oneself. Both these are from the Self. This Self absorbs the cause and the effect and become one (indivisible). The Maya which the Self creates is annihilated by Self. A lie is a lie. If you believe the lie, you will have to tell the lie. If you believe the truth, you must tell the truth. Those who utter falsehood have no truth about them; there is no falsehood separate from them, but it is one with them. What is the cause of falsehood? Their mind becomes habituated to falsehood and they do not feel it to be false. They do not feel falsehood as a separate thing. If they knew it (falsehood) to be evil, their mind will not be inclined to falsehood. Then they will feel that there is a separate thing called truth. Then they will attain the good. Then they will know the correct path.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan asks that if it is sound that is generated from the world or is it the world that is generated from the sound? He asks if it is the effect that came from the cause or the cause that came from the effect? This is a deep probing into the principle of cause and effect – the principle of karma. (For deeper insights into “cause and effect” see verse 31.)

If there is a cause, there will be an affect – like science says, if there is an action, there will be reaction. Once there is a chicken, then there will be an egg and once there is an egg, then there will be a chicken. It is then an infinite loop – chicken out of egg and egg out of chicken. The  cause creates an effect and effect creates a cause and so on. Chicken becomes the cause and egg becomes the effect and then egg becomes the cause and chicken becomes the effect. The whole principle of karma works in this fashion of cause and effect. In creation, it is known that there first was light and from light came the sound (om). Light is the cause and sound is the effect. Then, from sound (energy/vibrations) the whole cosmos is created (as Science later found that matter is nothing but energy). So here, sound is the cause and cosmos is the effect.

Bhagwan says that the world is generated from the sound (om). Meaning, the sound (vibrations) take form (the world). He says that if cause is the effect there where does the cause come from? Meaning, if light was the cause and sound the effect, what was the cause of light? Bhagwan tickles the mind asking whether the world came out of sound or the sound came out of the world. Or, whether the cause came from the effect or the effect came from the cause. The same question that has always bothered the world – whether the chicken came first or the egg!

Bhagwan later answers the same by saying that neither the sound nor the world came first or second but they are both a manifestation of the Self (Source). The creation, the sound, the light is all within the Eternal Source, the Eternal Void, the Supreme Consciousness, the Shiva principle – just like butter, ghee and curd are hidden in the milk. Shakti is within Shiva itself. Shakti manifests out of Shiva and creates the world while Shiva (Purusha) remains an eternal witness to everything. So, Bhagwan further says that the cause and the effect are from the Self (Shiva). Cause and effect must be the slaves of oneself. Meaning, there are  both intermingled with each other. He says both of these are from the Self (Shiva). He says that this Self then absorbs the cause and the effect and become one (indivisible) again and the Maya which was created by the Self is annihilated by Self itself. All these principles are beautifully explained in the scriptures as Shiva, Shakti, Rudra, etc., where it is mentioned that Shiva itself acts as a destroyer (Rudra) and the whole creation (with cause and effect) get absorbed back into the Self (Shiva). 

Bhagwan further says that a lie is a lie.  He is referring to how the mind refuses to understand or know the truth about this illusion but rather stays comfortable with the lie. The eternal truth is that everything has sprung out of the same one Source, but man believes and lives in the illusion of separateness (falsehood). So he says that when you live in life, the lie itself becomes the truth. So he says that if you believe the lie, you will have to tell the lie and if you believe the truth, you must tell the truth. He says that those who utter falsehood have no truth in them; the falsehood is not separate from them, and they accept and live in the falsehood.

He asks then what is the cause of falsehood? He says that it is because their mind has become so habituated to falsehood that they do not feel it to be false. They do not feel falsehood as something separate from their reality but are completely merged with it. He says if they knew it (the falsehood) to be evil, then their mind would not be inclined to falsehood anymore. Then they would feel that there is a also something called the truth. Only when they realise it, they will strive and attain the good (truth), and only then they would know what the correct path is.

For deeper insights into “cause and effect” see verse 31.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 243

Just as all rivers enter the ocean, both the good and the evil enter the Atman. Both are sacrificed to the Atman. Both the good and the evil are from the Atman. They enter in that from which they came. Mind is the cause of good and evil acts. Mind is Atman’s power (instrument). No one can increase or diminish it (the soul force). What will happen will happen. lt will happen only in one way according to the eternal law.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that just as all rivers enter the ocean, both the good and the evil enter the Atman. Both are sacrificed to the Atman. Both the good and the evil are from the Atman. They enter in that from which they came. Meaning, all in the creation was born from the ONE nondual source – the ParaBrahma. All souls also came from that ONE source. Eventually, in the dual space, they get split into good and evil. But eventually they also go back to the Source from where they came from. Duality then merges into nonduality where everything becomes one.

He says that mind is the cause of good and evil acts. Mind is Atman’s power. Meaning, the soul is always pure but it is the mind that gets affected by duality of good and bad. Mind is the power of the soul. He says that no one can increase or diminish this power of the force. He says that whatever has to happen will happen and will happen only in one way according to the eternal law of the Cosmos. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 244

The seed is not from the tree. The seed is the beginning. A seed falls down from a tree and that seed grows into a small plant which grows into a tree. Again and again, trees grow from seeds. Similarly is creation. In the seed is the beginning but there is no ending. Wherever you may see, you see the same seed.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that the seed is not from the tree. He is referring the seed to the Supreme (God) and is referring the tree to creation. So, seed is not from the tree means God is not from the creation but the creation is from God. Thus, he says that the seed is the beginning. He soon also reveals that the seed has no end, meaning the Supreme source is infinite. He then says that a seed falls down from a tree and that seed grows into a small plant which then grows into a tree. Meaning, in the creation (tree) everything has its own seeds, which fall from the tree (is born) and grows into a small plant (ignorant) and then grows into a tree (mature and awakened). Thus, he says again and again, trees grow from seeds and the cycle continues. So, in every human (tree) there is always the seed (God). He says that in the seed is the beginning but there is no ending (just like the infinite creator). He says, wherever you may see, you see the same seed. Meaning, in every seed, be it in nature or in a human there is God present. So, wherever you see and in whatever you see, you are seeing the same seed (same god) in it’s infinite seed form, waiting to become the tree (to know its true nature).

Additional Notes

The seed and plant form also refers to the ignorant part of human consciousness where one is not aware of the subtle seed (God) within it. When it grows into a mature tree is when its seed becomes visible (human attains self-realisation) whereafter it produces more seeds. Like a self-realised Master produces more conscious humans like him.

This has been mentioned earlier in verse 151, where he says “If you keep a seed safe in a box, it will not yield plenty. If you sow it in the earth and cultivate it, one seed yields thousands. From one lamp, you can light a thousand lamps. One tree produces thousands of flowers. Flower is the downward state. The tree is the upward state.” He says that keeping a seed in the box will not yield plenty but when sowed in the earth and cultivated, one seed yields thousands. Meaning, if one remains ignorant noone will benefit out of him. But if the soul cultivates and realises the Self, it can help thousands of ignorant souls realise their true nature. So he says that from one lamp you light a thousand lamps, and that is the true meaning of “Jyotse Jyot Jagao” For more deeper insights into this verse read verse 151.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 245

“Those who have no doubt, find that this doubtlessness is the path to one pointedness of mind. A doubting person’s intellect is small (limited). Wherever they may see, they see nothing but doubt. Everybody is subject to his own nature. There is no cause for finding that quality which one has not. In the shaking water, a man cannot see his shadow. In the still water, a man can see his shadow, quite properly. Similarly, to a fickle-minded man, his real nature is not visible. To a steady-minded man wherever he may see, he sees the ONE, indivisible. He sees himself in others. If you put on red spectacles you see everything red. You cannot see green color. Everyone sees according as he thinks.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that those who have no doubt, realise that the path to achieving one-pointedness of mind is doubtlessness (faith). He says that the intellect of doubting people is small because wherever and whatever they look at, they have nothing but doubt.

He says everybody lives as per their own nature, which is the outcome of their tendencies and karmic structures. If this is realised then there would be no urge to judge anyone and find those qualities in them which they do not actually have.  He says that in the shaking water, a man cannot see his shadow but he can see it properly in the still water. Similarly, to a fickle-minded man, what he sees in others is his own qualities but he is unable to realise this since his fickle mind (chanchal mann) cannot still itself to reveal this. The contents of his mind (thoughts/imaginations) are reflections that crop up from his own samskaras (tendencies) and he believes it to be the qualities of who he is judging. So he says that if you put on red spectacles, you would not see green but red even though the reality is green. We see others not as they are but as we are. Then he says that when the one whose mind is steady (nischal mann) looks at anything or anyone all he sees is the indivisible ONE. His own still mind reflects his own pure qualities in others and thus he is able to see God in all and unable to see any difference between himself and others. So he states that everyone sees according to what they think.

The whole verse is pointing out to his message “Do not judge anyone. Accept everyone the way they are.”

Additional Notes

It may be of interest to read a very similar real practical incident from another great Jnani – Ramana Maharishi

From the book ~ Ramana Periya Puranam, (Inner Journey of 75 Old Devotees)
V. Ganesan writes about devotee Raja Iyer :

Raja Iyer who visited Bhagavan at Skandashram and Virupaksha cave was still so fond of food that he would go into the kitchen and eat anything, whether cooked or raw.

One day, a devotee complained to Bhagavan saying,  “Bhagavan, what is all this? The man is uncontrollable; he eats whatever he wants!”
Bhagavan smilingly said,  “You are complaining about Raja.”
The devotee said, “Yes, Bhagavan. It is not according to the rules of the ashram.”
Bhagavan questioned, “Are you sure that it is a mistake on the part of Raja Iyer?”
The devotee said, “Yes, Bhagavan.”
Bhagavan continued, “Can you be clearer?  Why do you also not go into the kitchen and eat like that?”
The devotee answered, “No, Bhagavan, I cannot do that; I just cannot.”
Bhagavan told the devotee, “It is not his constant eating that is bothering you but the fact that you are not able to go inside and eat as often.”

In this manner, Bhagavan taught the devotee that there are no others. Our opinion about others is based upon our own shortcomings. The devotee was unable to eat as much as he wanted because he was afraid of Chinna Swami and therefore he was complaining.  But Raja Iyer was not afraid of Chinna Swami.  Raja Iyer told me years later that he had received many a berating from Chinna Swami, but this did not deter him from going into the kitchen and eating!

Bhagavan then advised the devotee, “There are no others; whatever you see outside is your own reflection.  Your mind is creating all this.”

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 246

Why do you hold an umbrella? To prevent the rain from falling on you. Rain is the Maya. Truth is the umbrella. Chitta (firm mind) is the handle (of the umbrella). In everything, there is truth. But there are very few men who have realized that truth. Maya is from Atman. But Atman is not from Maya. The prime minister is of the king. The prime minister is not the king. Mind is not Atman. Mind is the reflection of the Atman. Mind is two ranks below Atman. Mind is subject to destruction; Atman is indestructible. Mind is deluded by the various objects to the senses. Atman is not subject to the delusion caused by the three fold qualities, Trigunas. Mind is subject to the three fold qualities. When we say that mind is a fragment of the Atman, we mean mind is to Atman what the river is to the ocean. Atman is the ocean; its water is measureless and endless. Similarly, Atman has neither a beginning nor an ending. Atman has not come from anywhere nor does He go anywhere. Atman is everywhere. There is nothing existing but Atman. Anterior to you and posterior to you, is all creation which fact is unknown to you.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan asks why does one hold an umbrella? The obvious answer is to prevent the rain from falling on you. Here he is comparing the rain to “maya” and umbrella to “truth” and compares the handle of the umbrella to “chitta” (mind/conscience). He says that there is truth in everything, but only very few men have realized that truth. He says that maya is from atman (soul) but atman is not from maya. The prime minister is under the king and so the prime minister cannot be the king. Similarly mind cannot be the atman because the mind is only the reflection of the atman. He says mind is two ranks below atman (One rank below the atman is buddhi-the intellect which is one rank above the mind).

He says that mind is subject to destruction but the atman is indestructible. The mind is deluded by the various objects that the senses perceive, but the atman is not subject to the delusion caused by the three qualities or attributes of Trigunas. It is the mind that is influenced by the three-fold qualities. He says that when we say that the mind is a fragment of the atman, it means what the river (mind) is to the ocean (atman). Atman is the ocean with water that is measureless and endless. Similarly, atman has neither a beginning nor an end. Atman has not come from anywhere nor does it go anywhere. It is eternal and it is everywhere. In reality, there is nothing existing other than the Aactive

tman, anterior and posterior – all is Atman. Everything seen outside and that seems so real is nothing but what is being reflected in the atman and this fact, he says, is what remains unknown to you.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 247

When the life energy moves in an outward direction; desire is generated for the sense objects. It manifests as mind and it is divided and subdivided into two, three, and six. Thus what is called “world” comes into being. From this world all qualities come into being. Five organs of action are related to the earth. Five chief senses are related to space. Organs of action are said to belong to Satva guna. He who conquers the senses is the free man. To such a man, fulfilment comes from himself.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that when the life energy (prana) moves in an outward direction, the desires for the sense objects are generated. It is only then that the mind becomes active. Life energy moving in an outward direction means focus being outwardly. It is so said that energy flows where attention goes.  If attention is outside, energy (prana) flows outward in order to manifest it. So, when the mind comes into being, the “world” comes into being with it. In previous many verses it is has been mentioned of how the world exists only if the mind is active (see verse 206).

He says that when the world comes into being, then all qualities (Satva, Rajas, Tamas) also come into being. He says that the five organs of action (karmendriyas – mouth, feet, hands, anus and genitals) are related to the earth while the five chief senses (jyanendriyas – ears, eyes, nose , tongue and skin) are related to space. Organs of action are said to belong to Satva guna. He says that the one who conquers the senses is the free man and for such a man, fulfilment comes from within himself.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 248

Think and think about Brahman. Mind, though seemingly different, is one and one only. Mind when it is one pointed is great indeed. This mind is the eternal “mind”. This eternal mind is “supreme joy” (happiness).This eternal mind is called “Chidakash” (consciousness space). A clean mind is a clean space. A clean space is “Siddhi” (fulfilment). This clean space is yoga (union with God). This clean space is the heart. When you move in this clean space, it is the “fulfilment”. When you move in this clean space, the difference between “you” and “I” will vanish. In this clean space is Mukti (liberation from bondage), Bhakti (selfless love for God), Shakti (energy) and the path suitable. This clean space is Buddhi (intellect). When the Jeeva dwells in this clean space, the attachments to sense objects will be burnt away. This clean space is Brahma Randhra (the cavity in which Brahma dwells). What is called Raja yoga is above the neck. What is called the “Color cavity” is above the neck.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan asks to think and think about Brahman. Meaning, that one always contemplate on the Brahman (Supreme). He says that mind seems to be different (separate from the Supreme) but in reality it is one and merged with the Cosmic Mind. He says that it is indeed great when the mind becomes one-pointed, because that is when the mind stills (nishchal). This state of still mind or pure mind is called Chitta. Bhagwan calls this pure mind as the eternal “mind” (sky of consciousness), which give supreme joy and bliss. This eternal mind (Chitta) he thus calls “Chidakash” (Chitta+akash).

He says that a clean mind is a clean space. This clean space is the expanded heart space, where the soul is in yoga (united with the Supreme). This heart space is also known as “Hridayakash”. He says that this clean space is “Siddhi” and that when you move in this clean space, it is the “fulfilment”. Meaning, that when one reaches this state, one attains the Siddhi of attaining whatever one wants. So when he says when you move in this space, he is referring one’s constant contemplation in this clean space, where whatever is contemplated upon gets materialised or fulfilled.

He says that when you move in this clean space, the difference between “you” and “I” will vanish. Meaning, when you remain absorbed in this space of Chidakasha, all the differences of dualities will disappear. It is this clean space, he says, that the paths of Mukti, Bhakti and Shakti are suitable.  Mukti means liberation from bondage of death and life cycle.  Bhakti means selfless unconditional love towards anything and everything in this cosmos including the Creator.  Shakti means the path of the Kundalini.

He says that this clean space is the space of the purified Buddhi (intellect). When the Jeeva dwells in this clean space, the attachments to sense objects will be burnt away. This clean space is Brahmarandhra (the cavity in which Brahma dwells). Read more on Brahmarandhra in verse 59.

He repeats what he had said earlier that what is called Raja yoga is actually above the neck (see verses 94 & 209). He also refers to Chidakasha as the “color cavity” because this is where multiple colours are experienced when the Kundalini rises and reaches the Sahasrara. 

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 249

Mantra is this Brahma Randhra. Mantra is the minister to Prana. This prime minister of Prana is Atma Bindu (Atma point, which is spaceless, timeless, causeless). In the midst of this is eternal Mantra. In the midst of this is “Chidakash”. This Chidakash is Chit. This is supreme joy. This is the supreme medicine. This supreme medicine is the supreme guru whose Mantra is “Tatwamasi”; That art Thou; Thou art That.

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says that mantra is this Brahma Randhra (read previous verse for the continuity). He is referring to the primodial sound (mantra) of Om (read verse 231).  The whole creation began from Om (read verse 109). Every soul is a manifestation of the Supreme and every soul carries the vibration of Om, which is what Bhagwan is referring to as the ‘mantra’.

He says mantra is the minister to Prana and that the prime minister of Prana is Atma Bindu. Meaning, the prana is generated from the mantra (om) and the mantra (om) is generated from the Source point called Atma Bindu. Bindu means point or center and Atma means soul – so ‘point/center of the soul). So, he says that in the midst of this point (Atma Bindu) is the eternal Mantra and that in the midst of this point is “Chidakash”. He says this Chidakash is Chit (Chit+akash). This heart space he defines as supreme joy – the supreme medicine. This supreme medicine, he says, is the supreme guru (seat of Guru) whose Mantra is “Tatwamasi” meaning That art Thou (That is You); Thou art That (You are That). Meaning, God is you and you are God. The other terms used for this same is ‘Aham Brahmasmi’ or ‘I am that I Am’ or Shivohum (I am Shiva).

So, in simpler terms he says that the Chidakash is the seat of the soul (Jeevatma) which is not different from the Supreme or Creator or God (Parmatma). Because he clearly indicates that the primodial mantra of Om (which is the cause of all creation) is the same mantra that emanates at the seat of the soul (Chidakash) from where first prana (life force energy) is generated, which in turn keeps the human alive.

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Bhagwan Nithyananda’s “Chidakasha Gita” ~ Verse: 250

“Why is man called man? The true man is he who ruminates (performs Manana). If you do not know the path leading to Brahman, you will be born again and again. If you do not know the path, you will have no contentment. This contentment consists in doing your duty without attachment to results. This non-attachment to results of action is called Mukti. It is also called the supreme joy. Desire is hell. Desirelessness is supreme joy. The supreme position is Shiva Shakti. The Shiva Shakti is the knower of both the visible and the invisible.”

INSIGHTS ~ by Jake Light (please do not modify/edit any content)

Bhagwan says man is truly a man if he ruminates (contemplates) on the ultimate truth of life. If he does not then he does not realise the path that leads to Brahman (Supreme/God) and so he would need to be born again and again. He says that without knowing path, one will never be contended and that true contentment is in doing one’s duty without attachment to the results (non-expectation). This non-attachment to results of action is Mukti (liberation), which brings supreme joy. He reminds again that desire is hell and desirelessness is supreme joy. He says that the highest position is Shiva Shakti, which s the knower of both the visible (gross) and the invisible (invisible).

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