The CHIDAKASHA GITA demystified

Chidakasha Gita is the sacred compilations of the words that ‘spilled’ from Bhagwan Nithyananda. Since Bhagwan always lived in communion with the Supreme, every word that came out from him were very meticulously collected by one of his early devotees named Tulasi Amma. All the collections of the Chidakasha Gita are a direct attempt of the timely work of Tulasi Amma, to whom we need to be fully grateful to, because without her, the world would have never known what the great incarnation had ever spoken of. These were first published in Kannada language by Tulasi Amma after consent from Bhagwan. It is from these collections that the teachings of Bhagwan Nithyananda came to be known to the world.

IMPORTANT: It must be always remembered that the words of Bhagwan contains his expressions of the great mysteries of life. The dimensions and states he moved in on the planet, are states unaccessible to the humans, accept to the precious few who have strived to reach the peaks of human consciousness. Hence, it becomes a privilege to receive drops of that nectar that flowed from those realms.  Thus, whenever Bhagwan spoke in a trance-like state, words obviously must have fell short, to perhaps cover his flow in entirety, but fortunately whatever was picked by Tulasi Amma, she gifted it to the world.  This book remained not very popular because the words did not make much sense to the masses, but it contains a hidden wealth of wisdom of life. It reveals much details about a seeker’s journey on the path of consciousness. Hence, it must be a seeker’s effort to raise one’sconsciousness to make these precious words ‘readable’. That is why it is always recommended that the Chidakasha Gita must not be read, but meditated upon, in pure silent awareness, so as to get the message into our consciousness.

Hence, i would highly recommend that readers always directly meditate on the teachings from Chidakasha Gita and refer to the insights mentioned here, only if one is finding difficulty in understanding the words of Bhagwan.

All the insights that i was able to provide here, are completely by the grace of Bhagwan and the grace of my Master, from whom i received the wisdom, from where it was possible for me to relate to the teachings of Bhagwan.

So, i highly recommend, that you first always read the direct message, meditate on it and contemplate on it, and only in case of difficulty refer to the insights provided. Nevertheless, this itself shall become a great practice for studying and practicing the words of Bhagwan more deeper and more profoundly.

|| Om Namo Bhagwavate NIthyanandaya ||

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Kindly do not fall for plagiarism so as to keep the authenticity of these texts intact.

Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 1 

“Jnanis are mindless. To Jnanis, all are the same. They have no slumber, no dreams, nor sleep. They are always in sleep. The sun and the moon are the same to them. To them, it is always sunrise. The glass of a chimney lamp, when covered with carbon, is not transparent. Similarly, the carbon of the mind should be removed.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan refers to Jnanis (liberated ones) as mindless. When there is no mind, there is no duality or discrimination. When there is no discrimination, all appear the same to Jnanis. Because there is no mind, there is no slumber nor sleep nor dreams. They are always in ‘sleep’. This sleep Bhagwan is referring to the Turiya state of deep meditation or samadhi state. It is a state where the minds of the liberated ones actually get merged into the infinite consciousness and they no more have a mind of their own. Even the sun and moon are same to them without any duality or discrimination. To them, it is always sunrise, always brightness, always light. Bhagwan refers to the glass of a chimney lamp, which when covered with carbon (soot) loses its transparency and the light dims because of the dark glass. Bhagwan is referring to carbon as the impurities of the mind, like thoughts, desires, emotions of all kinds. So, he says, the impurities of the mind also should be removed just as we remove the carbon from the chimney glass so that the bright light shine through.

Additional Notes

What does it mean by Mindless?

Mindless is referred here to as “having no mind”. Mind is the cause for karma because it is in the mind that all samskaras (psychic impressions) lie. All vrittis (waves emanating samskaras) cause the mind to think, discriminate, cause emotions, and even make one do each and every action). Every human has 5 koshas or sheaths out of which only one is gross and can be seen and touched, that is the physical sheath. The other 4 sheaths are pranamaya kosha, manomaya kosha, gyanamaya kosha, anandamaya kosha. In these the manomaya kosha is linked with the mann or mind. This sheath gets annihilated or dissolved and merged with higher sheaths and that is when the mind is dissolved. So when the mind is completely purified of all these impressions, one becomes mindless. That is how the liberated ones (Avadhootas) have no mind of their own and thus any of their actions are not motivated by any selfish motives, but they operate now through the cosmic mind.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 2 

“There are three nadis in the body: the sun or the Sushumna; the moon or the Ida; the star or the Pingala. The first is red in color, the second, blue, and the third, green.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan mentions here of the three major nadis (subtle nerves) – the Sushumna, Ida & Pingala nadis. The Sushumna is referred as to Sun and as red in color. The Ida is referred to as the Moon and of blue color. The Pingala is referred to as the star and green in color.

Additional Notes

What are Nadis?

Nadis are subtle nerves situated in the next subtle layer on the physical layer, called as Pranamaya Kosha. These nadis are responsible for carrying cosmic currents or energies that keeps the body alive. There 72,000 nadis in a human, out of which 3 are the most important major nadis, which is what Bhagwan is pointing towards in this verse.

The Sushumna nadi runs through the spinal cord from the base of the spine to the crown of the head and is referred to as the Sun. The other two nadis, the Ida nadi and the Pingala nadi run in a zig-zag fashion around the sushumna nadi, intersecting through each chakras to the pineal gland located at the Agna chakra. The Ida runs on the left and Pingala runs on the right of the spinal cord.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 3 

“Where these three nadis meet, is the heart space. As we go on practicing yoga, the Bindu-sound is heard in the head. This sound is one, indivisible.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan mentions that where these 3 major nadis meet, that is the heart space, which is referred in Sanskrit as Hridya Aakash. Bhagwan says as one goes on practicing Yoga (not just precisely yogasana – we will see this more clearly in forthcoming teachings) the Bindu sound is heard, which is also referred to as the Anhad Naad, which is a sound not caused through duality but is the one indivisible sound.

Additional Notes

What is Anhad Naad?

Anhad means infinite or limitless or nondual. Nada means sound.  So here anhad  he is referring to the nondual sound or the unstruck sound.  Because for creation of any sound, two is needed. Like two things must collide or come together to create that sound, like a clap or a drum or even a thunder. But the anhad (unstruck) naad or sound is created from one, from nonduality, from the infinite, meaning, it originates on it’s own, that is from the Supreme source. This sound is heard only after chitta vritti nirodaha or after all the vrittis (waves or disturbances) of the mind are dissolved.

Anahata Naad manifests itself in various forms and it can range from the sound resembling the sound of sea to the sound of huge bells to the sound of shank (chonch). It is the experience of adepts that when the sound of flute is heard the entire being permeates with divine bliss and the body consciousness is lost.  Similarly, when the sound of kettledrum is heard, the individual develops clairvoyance and the ability to see distant things. But ultimately, the naad that leads seekers to the ultimate goal of yoga, that is the Nirvikalpa Samadhi, is the known as the meghanaad – the sound of thunder.

According to the “HANSOPINISHAD” there are 10 types of Anhad Naad:

  1. The First one is ” CHHINI”
  2. The Second is “CHHICHHINI”
  3. The Third sound is “BELL”
  4. The Fourth sound of CONCHSHELL”
  5. The Fifth sound of Indian LUTE ( TANTRI)
  6. The sixth sound of “DRUM”
  7. The seventh sound of “FLUTE “
  8. The Eight sound of “TABOR” ( MRIDANGA)”
  9. The ninth sound of “KETTLEDRUM” (BHERI)
  10. The last one is the sound of “THUNDER CLOUDS”

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 4 

Just as camphor is consumed by the flames of fire, so also, mind must be consumed by soul fire.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan is referring camphor (karpur) to mind and fire to soul. So, he says that just like how the camphor burns itself out completely without a trace  when it is touched by fire, the mind also must be dissolved into the soul, by the soul fire.

Additional Notes

What does it mean mind dissolving into soul?

Please refer to additional notes of verse 1, in which it was seen how we are not just the physical body but a combination of 5 sheaths (layers), in which one of the layer is the mind sheath or manomaya kosha.  With consistent spiritual practices this layer gets completely dissolved and merged into the real you, the soul. Bhagwan refers soul fire to spiritual practices that will burn the impurities of the mind, thus dissolving the mind and merging it into the soul. In verse 1 Bhagwan refers this state of mindlessness to the state of Jnanis (self-realised).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 5 

The copra, detached from the shell, makes a dull sound when shaken; so also the body and soul must be thought of as separate. The first is light; by that light, all vices are consumed.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan talks of how the copra (dried coconut) inside the kernel of the coconut detaches itself as it dries, and at that time if the coconut is shaken, a dull sound can be heard of the copra moving inside it. Bhagwan refers to the kernel or the shell of the coconut as body and the copra he refers to the soul. He thus says that with practice of Yoga, a seeker will gradually learn to see the body and soul as separate. But he says that light is of prior importance (“first is light”). Like verse 3, he refers to the soul fire as light. It is from this light that all the vices or impurities (of the mind) are destroyed.

Additional Notes

So, by now, we can realize that the verses of Chidakasha Gita are not in bits and pieces, but it is a chain of teachings, like the beads in a rosary. All verses in continuity and linked with each other. It is thus important that the verses must be read in sequence from the start. So from the start till now, it can be observed that Bhagwan is only speaking about the importance of ‘dissolving the mind’ by destroying it’s impurities.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 6 

Just as we draw water from a well, we should draw breath; when we breathe out, it should be like letting down the bucket into the well. When we breathe out, it is the carbon; when we breathe in, it is the breath of Omkar. Breath of Omkar is the manas.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan states that just like water is drawn in a bucket from the well, the breath also must be similarly drawn in during inhalation, and while exhaling, it should be like letting the empty bucket down into the well. He adds that what we breathe out is the carbon (impurities of the mind -refer to verse 1)  and what we breathe in, is the breath of Omkar, meaning the breath of life.  Bhagwan says then that the breath of Omkar is the mind, which is the true mind or the pure mind.

Additional Notes

In just one small verse Bhagwan has revealed a whole sadhana (spiritual practice) in itself. This practice is a key practice in Kundalini sadhana and is related with breathwork. Many practices today teach this in varied formats. A word of caution is that one must never attempt Kundalini sadhana on their own, and needs to be done under the guidance of a Kundalini guru. The general practice referred here is basically breathing but practitioners who are already practicing any form of Kundalini sadhana will know precisely the deeper practice that is being referred to.

In this verse, Bhagwan firstly talks about the importance of breathwork and the importance of linking each breath with the “Aum” mantra. He refers each breath (inhalation and exhalation) to the drawing of the well water with a rope bucket. Every breath taken in (inhalation) brings pure cosmic energy from the Cosmos into the body (precisely through the pranamaya kosha – pranayama means disciplining of the prana) and cleanses the other koshas including the manomaya kosha (mind). Every breath out (exhalation) carries the subtle impurities from the koshas. Inhalation brings in pure cosmic energy, when the “Aum” mantra is added to the inhalation. Omkar is Om (Aum), which is the pranava mantra. Pranva in sanskrit means ‘life force’ or ‘life giver’ and it is out of this Omkar the whole cosmos birthed. Bhagwan links this powerful life-infusing mantra to the inhalation. He further also says that the breath of Omkar is the true mind, a purified mind. Refer to verse 1, where Bhagwan mentions that the carbon (impurities) of the mind has to be removed to attain a pure mind).

It is important to know that from verse 1 till here, Bhagwan has been only talking of purifying the mind with “Yoga”. Now this is the “Yoga” and not really the Yogasanas. The meaning of Yoga is “to unite” – the union of individual consciousness with the Supreme consciousness, and he is referring to Pranayama and Raj Yog (meditation), which will be seen in the future verses.

It is also important to note that, this entire practice needs one’s conscious efforts to be done with total awareness, without which it may not yield desired results.

The practitioners of Kundalini sadhana will know that this verse is precisely pointing deeper to “spinal cord breathing”.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 7

“Manas is Jeeva; but their positions are different. Jeevatman is Paramatman.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the mind (manas) is Jeeva (individual), meaning that the mind is the cause of maya. Jeeva is the individual who is bound in maya and thus living in ignorance, but all Jeevas are different in position, meaning at different states of consciousness.  Bhagwan refers the Jeevatman to individual consciousness and Parmatman to supreme consciousness, and thus he says that Jeevatman is Parmatman  meaning you are god.

Additional Notes

Jeeva means any living being – an insect, animal, bird, human. Atman means soul. So, here when Bhagwan says Jeevatman he is referring to the soul of the human being. Parmatman means god or the supreme consciousness. Every soul is a spark of that supreme force or a particle of that supreme. This is how he refers that every living being (jeevatman) is god (parmatman).

How is manas a jeeva (mind a living entity)?

It should be known firstly that only humans have mind sheath. No other living entity has the privilege of having a mind. But then, the moment mind comes in, the individual soul now becomes an independent thinking being, who is now capable of freewill and thus he takes decisions based on the contents of his mind. The mind thus gives rise to the separateness because it now creates a false identity of its own, which is popularly known as the false “I” or the ego. The real “I” is the Atman. What makes the Jeeva separate from god consciousness is the ego that exists because of the mind. Hence Bhagwan states “Manas is Jeeva” (meaning mind is the living entity) but he continues saying that their positions are different, meaning all individual are at different stages, depending on the contents of their mind, even though they are all god (Jeevatman is Parmatman)

The Upanishads explains the difference between Jeeva, Atma and Parmatma. It states  that the Jeeva is like a tree. Sitting in that tree are two birds: one the Atma, and the other the Paramatma. Paramatma witnesses the Atma eating the fruit of the tree. Parmatma waits for the Atma to turn to him. This is the situation of every Jeeva – it is too busy enjoying the fruit of the tree (Jeeva that is enjoying through the mind and senses). When the Jeeva becomes fed up with the enjoyment of the fruit, only the its attention turns towards Parmatma.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 8

“A man or woman should be educated. What is education? Jeeva should know the secret that He is the Paramatman.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that men and women must be educated on the real education. The real education that the Jeeva (human being) is not a finite mortal being but none other than the infinite and immortal Parmatman (god).

Additional Notes

This verse indicates Bhagwan’s instruction to educate the world that they are themselves manifestation of god. A Jeeva remains a jeeva (living entity) until it realises this. It is important to know that every living entity is called Jeeva. Even animals, insects and plants are Jeeva, that is why they are referred to as Jeeva-Jantu. It is only the privilege of human beings to realise their own divinity, which is why it is said that it is a great blessing that a soul gets a human incarnation, because it is only with the human incarnation that the soul can make use to realise it’s divinity and thus remember who it really is, and thus get liberated from the endless loop of life and death. Even powerful beings of the subtle higher or lower worlds cannot get liberated and this is only possible through a human incarnation. That is why Bhagwan is emphasising that men and women must be educated on this reality and that this secret of how man is god, must be made known to them, and that is the real education.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 9

“Paramatman is in Jeevatman. The real Mukti is to know the subtle in the gross.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan repeats in this verse that God (Parmatman) is man (Jeevatman). The real liberation is to realise the subtle (soul) in the gross (physical body).

Additional Notes

Like the previous verse, Bhagwan is emphasising that realising that “I am god” is real liberation. In previous verse he said “Jeeva should know this secret, but in this verse he uses the word Jeevatman. There is a difference between Jeeva and Jeevatman.

Until man realises that he/she is god, it remains only a Jeeva. When this education is realised by a human, he/she realises that he/she is not just a body but a soul (Atman), it realises that it is not Jeeva but Jeevatman (Jeeva+Atman). But Bhagwan does not stop there but goes further to reveal the secret that the Jeevatman is actually the Parmatman (Param+Atman)  or the Supreme Being. When the Jeevatman realises this, it is called as self-realisation, where the soul has not realised it’s real Self, that is, God. This is why self-realisation is also known as god-realisation, after which the soul becomes eligible for mukti or liberation from the bondage of the birth and death cycle. Bhagwan further says that this is real (mukti) liberation, where now the Jeeva is experiencing itself as Jeevatman, or experiencing the subtle (soul) in the gross (body) {also see verse 5}. 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 10

“We should leave off the gross sleep and sleep the subtle sleep. We should enjoy the sleep obtained from the practice of Pranayam.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan mentions that we must gradually move from the gross sleep to subtle sleep. He reveals that this subtle sleep can be enjoyed as the fruits of the practice of pranayam. The subtle sleep that he is pointing to is Yog Nidra or Samadhi.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan mentions of two kinds of sleep – the gross and subtle sleep. The gross sleep is that which probably 99% of the humans sleep at night, where the body is rested but this is unconscious sleep, where the sleeper is as good as dead during the sleep because the sleeper is not aware of himself. He becomes aware only when he wakes up, either when the gross sleep is disrupted in between or when he wakes up the next morning. This unconscious sleep is what is referred to as “gross sleep”. The “subtle sleep” is a sleep of awareness. When one enters into the state of awareness even while in sleep it is known as Yog Nidra. This is being referred to as subtle sleep. This need not necessarily be the sleep of the night; even when one enters into deep meditation during wakeful hours, he enters into subtle sleep or samadhi. Bhagwan says that the bliss of this subtle sleep (samadhi) is obtained by the practice of pranayam (breathwork).

The 5 states of consciousness

Going much into the depth of this teaching, to understand this, it is essential to know the 5 states of consciousness.

  1. Jagrat or Wakeful state: This is the state in which we are fully awake in mind and body and doing our regular activities of daily life, through the 5 sense organs with the use of vision, taste, smell, sound or touch.
  2. Svapna or Dream state: This is the state in which the mind enjoys the the 5 senses only in the mind, because only the mind is awake in this state while the body with its 5 sense organs are at rest.  In the dream state, we imitate or relive the experiences that we had in the jagrit or wakeful state.  The mind itself is the one who reflects it, sees it, enjoys or gets affected by it positively or negatively. Due to this activity, peaceful sleep is disrupted because even though the body is at rest but the mind is fully at play. The first two are the gross sleep that Bhagwan is mentioning about.
  3. Sushupti or Sleep state: This is the state in which the body and the mind, both are at rest. There is absence of dream and thus one enters into deep peaceful sleep. This is when one feels very refreshed in the morning and even states of having “enjoyed a sound sleep” but still unaware of how is it really possible to enjoy something even when the mind, body and ego were at sleep. This knowing of having a sound sleep, is actually the experience of the soul in awareness that was witnessing the sound sleep.
  4. Turiya state: This is the state where the real you (soul) experiences the soul itself.  Here the individual is aware of his own consciousness and of himself being available and present as pure awareness. This can be referred to as Savikalpa Samadhi. Thoughts may arise during this state but the individual is completely nonreactive as it is in a pure awareness state.
  5. Turiyatita or Chidakasha state: This is the state where the ego is completely dissolved with no existence and thus it is an expansion or merging of the soul into the limitless or the infinite. It is a completely nondual state where the union of the soul or self has taken place with the Supreme. This state is the Nirvikalpa Samadhi. Various popular expressions of this state are:
    I am that I am ~ I am God ~ I am Shiva ~ Shivohum ~ Aham Brahmasi ~ Tatvamasi
  • The 1st state is of the Waker who is experiencing the gross physical world.
  • The 2nd state is of the Dreamer who is experiencing the subtle mind-projected world.
  • The 3rd state is of the Deep-Sleeper who is experiencing the unmanifest world.
  • The 4th state is of the Self who is experiencing itself as the Supreme or God or the Cosmos.

So, when Bhagwan says, “We should leave off the gross sleep and sleep the subtle sleep” this is what he means. That we must move from the 1st and 2nd states to higher states of consciousness.  When he says, ” We should enjoy the sleep obtained from the practice of Pranayam” he is simply pointing towards the possibility of attaining these higher states through deep breathwork (Pranayam)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 11

The upgoing breath is like the wheels inside a clock. Its movement is inside; when the movement of the breath is internal, one will see the world in himself.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the upgoing breath (prana) is just like the wheels of the clock that is moving inside but cannot be seen. When the external breath is internalised (through breathwork), the practitioner will also internalise and begin seeing the world within himself.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan compares the upgoing breath to the wheels of a clock. There are so many wheels inside a clock and there is so much actually happening with the internal coordination of these wheels. From the outside, all that we can see is a smoothly and systematically functioning clock, but inside the clock so many wheels are moving and working to keep up the functioning and existence of the clock. Same happens with us. Externally, we may not notice how the body is functioning in a very simple and easy manner but deep inside there are many systems working with great precision at all times. Prana is the fuel of all systems and to keep a human alive. But greater things are possible when this prana and internalised and sublimated upward. Bhagwan compares these wheels of the clock to the internalised breath (prana) revealing  that when one internalises the breath, one is actually working on the subtle breath, which is governed by the same cosmic intelligence that runs this cosmos. External breath is the air you breathe. Internal breath is the subtle breath or prana. So, he says that “when the movement of breath is internal” meaning when you gain control over your subtle breath (prana) and are able to channelize it, then you are actually aligning with the same cosmic intelligence that governs this whole cosmos. So, just like the external breath is internalised, the external world (macrocosm) also begins to get internalised (microcosm) and one begins to see the world within as he is now experiencing nonduality within and out.

What is internalising of breath?

Bhagwan did not mention the word breath but he says “upgoing breath” Read verse 6, to understand the process of breathing that Bhagwan referred to. In that verse, we see clearly that he is not talking just about the physical breath of air that we breathe in and our, but he is referring to the prana. In that verse, we already saw that external breath is air that is breathing in of oxygen and breathing out of carbon-dioxide but if that is internalized (spinal cord breathing) like drawing in bucket of water in a well, then the internal breath is all about prana moving through the spinal cord up and down. This is what is meant by internalising of breath. With this process, the Kundalini or chit shakti begins rising from lower chakras to higher chakras. This is referred to as the upgoing breath, the movement of prana upwards. Eventually, with purification, the seeker begins to experience that he and god are not different (verse 7) and that is when one begins experiencing the cosmos within.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 12

Just as we see the sky reflected in the water in an earthen pot, so also, to the internal vision, the sky of consciousness becomes visible.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that when one internalises the vision, the whole sky of consciousness becomes visible within just like how externally we see the sky’s reflection in a pot of water.

Additional Notes

In the previous verse (11), Bhagwan was talking of internalising the external breath. Similarly, in this verse he talks about internalising the external vision. The physical eyes is the external vision that sees the gross world. There is an inner eye (often referred to as the third eye)  is the internal eye that can see the subtle world, which is invisible to the external physical eyes.  This verse, please note, is in continuity to the previous verse, where Bhagwan had mentioned that when one internalises the external breath, one sees the external world within, that is the subtle world. This “seeing” of the external world internally is what is being referred to the internal vision in this verse. It says that through internal vision, the sky of consciousness (Chidakasha) becomes visible just as vividly the external eyes sees the reflection of the sky in an earthen pot of water. The pot is the seeker. The water is the sky of consciousness (Chidakasha)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 13

If food is prepared in a gold vessel, the dog eats it. If it is prepared in an earthen vessel, then also the dog eats it.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the dog eats the food if it is prepared in a golden vessel and even eats it if prepared in an earthen vessel. It makes no difference to the dog.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan is referring the dog’s lack of discrimination between gold and mud, to the state of a Jnani (self-realised beings). Just like the dog only sees the food and not the quality of the vessel in which the food is served, a Jnani also sees only the god in every human and living being, with no discrimination made on the basis of religion, caste, colour, gender, nationality, species, etc. He does not discriminate between superior and inferior, rich and poor, good and bad, and so on, because everything is now one for him and there is no sense of any duality left in him. He is now operating in complete nonduality, where for him, both gold and dust are alike.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 14

The sun-light is reflected in the salt water of the sea. It is also reflected in the clear water of a tank at the top of a hill. It is not enough if we see with the eye but we should experience it.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the sunlight is reflected both in the salt water of the sea as well as also reflected in the clear water of a water tank on top of a hill. He adds that just seeing this is not enough, but one should be able to actually experience this.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan continues speaking on nonduality (read previous verse for continuity) and in this verse mentions how a Jnani sees everything as one. The consciousness of a Jnani is like the sunlight that reflects on any water, irrespective of whether it is salty waters of the sea or fresh water of a water body on a hill. The sunlight reflects without any discrimination. The Sun can be referred to god or supreme consciousness and the sunlight is the presence of god in salty and freshwater alike, without any bias. After revealing nonduality with clear two examples (in verse 13 & 14)  he then says that just seeing (nonduality) in this way is not enough, but it must be experienced. Meaning, just wisdom of Oneness and nonduality is not enough, but one must become a Jnani (self-realised) and experience it in reality.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 15

On a tree grow numberless flowers; the flowers all perish; but the tree does not perish for a long time. The visible is like flowers, the invisible is like the tree.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that many flowers grow on a tree and these flowers will soon perish, but the tree does not perish for a long time. All that is visible is like the flowers  and that which is invisible is like the tree.

Additional Notes

In very simple words Bhagwan is talking of the invisible soul that does not perish for long. He compares the soul to a tree that remains for a very long time than the flowers that everyday blossom, fall, die and perish. He refers the flowers to the visible things on the earth, and that everything that is seen is shortlived and perishes with time, but what does not perish and remains for a long time is the soul. Why does he say tree remains for long time or the soul remains for a long time. Like how the tree also perishes are a long time and returns back to nature by dissolving into the five elements, similarly the soul also after a long time of multiple births and evolution, finally returns back to its Source – god consciousness.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 16

There are matches in a matchbox. Fire is produced only when the match is rubbed against the side of the box. So also, the Manas (mind) is the match; intellect (Buddhi) is the side of the box. We should rub the Manas against Buddhi and then we get the kingdom of Self which is the same as the liberation from the cycle of birth and death.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan talks of matches in a matchbox. He says fire is produced when the matchstick is rubbed on the side of the box. He compares the mind (manas) to the matchstick and he compares intellect (buddhi) to the igniting paper on the side of the matchbox. He says the mind should be rubbed against the intellect and only then we get to know the kingdom of the self, which is nothing but liberation from the cycle of birth and death.

Additional Notes

Why does the mind need to be rubbed against buddhi?

Buddhi is intellect. The world largely considers intellect and intelligence as the same, however they are not. Intellect and intelligence are completely different. Intelligence is information; the memory of the knowledge that is gathered from the outside world. Intellect is wisdom acquired from internal consciousness. Intelligence makes you clever, intellect makes you wise. Intellect is the decision-making capacity after inspecting the intelligence.  For example, knowing how to skilfully use a knife is intelligence, but the decision whether to use it for cutting vegetables or hurt someone is done by the intellect.

Bhagwan is asking to constantly rub the mind against intellect. Mind is nothing but intelligence, where it retains all skills and information based on the experiences of the individual. So, it is as good as saying ‘rub intelligence against intellect’. If one does not rub the mind with the intellect, then all actions will be done without proper discernment, without rightful discrimination of right and wrong. What we call as ‘unknowingly done’ is nothing but intelligence (mind) without intellect (buddhi). So, rubbing the mind against intellect keeps sharpening the intellect.  And when that is done, Bhagwan says, we realise the kingdom of the Self, meaning we attain the true knowledge of the Self (self-realisation), which he says is as good as attaining liberation from the repeated cycles of birth and death. One attains mukti or moksha or salvation.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 17

A man should be quite indifferent to honour and dishonour. He should not have the least love for his body; such a man will see the Supreme Being in everything and everywhere.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that one must remain indifferent to honour and dishonour. He further says that one should not have even little love for his body and for such a person it is possible to see the supreme in everything and everywhere.

Additional Notes

This is an extension of the verse 13 & 14, where Bhagwan talks on developing  nonduality and seeing god in everyone and everything. without any discrimination like how for the dog food given in gold vessel or earthen vessel is the same. Similarly, in this verse Bhagwan says one should have not difference between honour and dishonour, praise or criticism. He next says not to have the least love for the body, meaning that it is only when one identifies with the body that honour and dishonour affects him positively or negatively, because the body carries the identity of the person to which the person is attached to. When a person is attached to his identity or personality, he is sure to be affected by honour and dishonour or by praise or criticism. He further says that when one is least identified with the body and gives up the attachment of the body, he will begin seeing the supreme being or god in everyone and everything around. So, till the time he is identified with his separate identity, he is affected by duality (good and bad, pride and hurt, honour and dishonour) but when his identity dissolves, his duality dissolves and he begins living in nonduality now, with least discrimination. This is the Oneness principle emphasised at various parts of the Chidakasha Gita by Bhagwan.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 18

The Supreme Light and the Universal Light are identical.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that there is no difference between the Supreme Light and the Universal Light.

Additional Notes

Usually, the Supreme Light and Universal Light are considered to be different. Universal Light is the one light of the Universe. You could compare this Universal Light to the Sun of our Universe that as one source of light illuminates the whole Universe. Everything in the Universe comes under this light. All religions also sprouted from this Universe. All the religions have their own light but the one light that illuminates them is the Universal Light, just like how the sun illuminates all individuals of all religions alike.

Supreme Light is the light of God, the light of the Creation itself.  In the cosmos or creation, there are countless such Universes like ours with countless such suns, but the one illuminator of all the Universes is the Supreme Light (god’s light). Bhagwan thus says there is no difference in the Supreme light and Universal light because it is one and the same, exactly like how He explained in verse 7 & 8 that there is no difference between Parmatma (god) and Jeevatma (individual) and both are one; man is god.

Many religions honour the Supreme as light and even refer to individual soul as light or flame (jyoti) – the true meaning of the song “Jyot se Jyot Jagao”. You can see the word used is “Jyot Jagao” (awaken) and not “jalao” (light up) because the flame of the lamp is lit and not awakened. But this song is referring the light of the Satguru (Master) as the Universal Light. It seeks that the Satguru (Univeral Light) awaken the seeker’s flame with the Master’s flame, meaning light the individual lamp with the Universal lamp. But at the very ground level there is ignorance in humans of not knowing that humans are light, there is non-acceptance that all religions are one universal light, and thus ignorance of not knowing that the universal light is nothing but the supreme light. This ignorance is known as darkness, the opposite of light. This is why the song further goes as – “Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.) Mera antar timir mitao (burn my inner darkness of ignorance), Satguru, Jyotse Jyot Jago (O Master, awaken my flame with your flame.)

…… and so the Vedic prayer:

Asato ma sad gamaya (Lead us from non-being to being)
Tamaso ma jyotir gamaya (Lead us from darkness to light)
Mrityor ma amritam gamaya (Lead us from death to immortality)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 19

“From a plank, are manufactured tables, chairs, etc, etc. So also, Brahman is the primordial substance (element) from which numberless worlds are formed.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that just like how tables, chairs and other furnitures are manufactured from a wooden plank, the countless worlds are also formed from the Brahman or the Supreme source. 

Additional Notes

In the previous verse, in the additional notes, it was described as to how there is not one Universe but countless Universes that we are not aware of. In this verse Bhagwan is referring to the same “numberless worlds” meaning countless worlds that are all formed from the nothingness. The ‘nothingness’ is what we term as Brahman, from whom the creation has come into form, and that is why Brahma is referred to as the Creator. This tatwa (element) is also referred to as Brahma Tatwa or Param Tatwa, which means the primordial substance or element. Bhagwan already in the earlier verses stated that every being is Brahman, but they have not realised it yet. That is why the wisdom of knowing that one is god (god-realisation) is called Brahma Gyan. So with a simple metaphor he compares the chairs, tables and other furniture materials coming into existence out of a wooden plank with all the countless Universes or worlds coming into existence out of the Brahman.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 20

Manas and the Atman are the same to all people. At the final stage of the universe, all is one. At the present stage, there is difference in their mode of breathing, thinking, and their mental tendencies.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the mind and the soul are the same to everyone. At the final stage of the Universe, all becomes one. But at the present stage there is difference in their way of breathing, thinking and their mental attitudes.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that in reality there is no difference between the mind and the soul, and that this is known only in the final stage of the Universe (when dissolution happens) when all become one and nondual. But at the moment, due to ignorance of maya (illusion), everyone sees the mind and soul as separate, full of dualities. The difference happens due to the different ways each human breathes and thinks as per their mental tendencies.

It may be reminded that every human thinks differently, because each are in different state of consciousness. The state of consciousness comes from the individual’s karmic patterns. Karmic patterns are formed by psychic impressions or samskaras stored in their psyche. The psychic impressions or samskaras are the cause for the individual’s mental tendencies (vasanas).  The breath pattern changes as per the mental tendencies. Bhagwan’s this verse is emphasising on the breath, and this verse is cross-linked to verse 6 & 11, where Bhagwan has revealed the secret of the breathwork by which the karmic patterns can be influenced, which alters the state of consciousness and that dissolves the illusion of duality enabling one to see the Oneness of everything. 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 21

Fire, air, water, and earth are common to all. These may be used by all people alike . Similarly, well-water may be used by a Brahmin, a pariah, and children alike.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that fire, air, water, and earth are common to all and can be used by everyone alike. In the same way, the well water also can be used by anyone, be it a Brahmin, an pariah (outcaste) or children alike.

Additional Notes

The earth and everything in it is made up of 5 elements (ether, air, fire, water and earth) and thus Bhagwan says these are common to all or that these elements are common in all. Anyone and everyone is entitled to all these elements of nature. Similarly, Bhagwan is emphasising that just like that, even the well water belongs to to everyone, be it a Brahmin or an outcaste or a child. These words were spoken during times, when casteism and untouchability was prevalent in India, and Bhagwan is taking this example of caste discrimination with spiritual discrimination. Spiritual discrimination happens when people are discriminated to spiritual wisdom based on religion, path, community, practice, belief, faith, culture, tradition, etc. So, with the example of nondiscrimination with well water, Bhagwan is pointing towards the practice of spiritual nondiscrimination also, thus conveying that the spiritual wisdom is entitled to every human being and no discrimination of any kind should be made as all have the right to drink the wisdom on the self and divine and it’s secrets, just like a Brahmin or an outcaste or a child has all the right to the natural well water.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 22

Manas is the gingilly; buddhi is the oil mill; amrita (ambrosia) is the oil.”

INSIGHTS ~ 

Bhagwan says that the mind is like the gingilly seed, buddhi (intellect) is the oil mill and amrita (ambrosial nectar) is the oil that is churned by the buddhi (mill).

Additional Notes

This one line of Bhagwan has many deep secrets within its fold. This verse has reference to verse 16, where Bhagwan had stated that one must constantly rub the mind with the intellect to realise the kingdom of god (read verse 16 for details in depth to understand this verse better) . Bhagwan is referring the mind to gingilly seed (til in hindi) and refers the Buddhi (intellect) to the oil mill, where is gingilly seed (mind) is crushed in the oil mill (intellect). It is then that the oil (ambrosial nectar) will flow.

What is amrita (ambrosial nectar)

The ambrosial nectar is also known as the amrita or soma rasa or elixir and has been expounded by various mystic cultures around the world for eons. It is known as the nectar of immortality, which is also often referred to be as intoxicating as wine when drunk. Throughout the ages, for man, this immortal nectar has always remained a mystery and thus he has frantically been searching for this secret nectar across various geographical locations and man searches for it even today.  But the Kundalini path clearly explains that this ambrosial nectar is within every human and all these terms are just metaphors to the secret location within the human body itself. This divine nectar is produced by the ‘pineal gland’ in the human brain. Science has not fully known it’s functions. It cannot be activated physically but needs to be activated through altered states of consciousness by entering into meditative states. When it is activated, the pineal gland secretes this nectar, that drops and flows down the throat, where it is purified by the throat chakra and distributed further to other parts of the body via the nadis (see verse 2). Thus, the Yogi in the ecstasy of samadhi is often stated to be “drunk” with this nectar of bliss.  The very example of Lord Shiva drinking bhaang (an intoxicating drink) is widely misunderstood as Shiva getting drunk wine or alcoholic drink. This is only a metaphor pointing to this ambrosial nectar.

The amrita is what rejuvenates all the cells and organs and keeps the body young and active, and said to even give immortal life.

The pineal gland lies in the center of the brain and reciprocates to the BINDU point (third eye or ajna chakra). The same BINDU that Bhagwan has already referred to in verse 3. So, Bhagwan reveals in verse 16, that when the mind is constantly rubbed against buddhi  that this ambrosial fluid begins flowing. The Kundalini Yoga paths practices this.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 23

Buddhi is the king; Manas is the minister; Manas should be subordinated to Buddhi.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that buddhi (intellect) is the king, manas (mind) is the minister and that the mind should always be subordinate to the intellect.

Additional Notes

To know more about what buddhi (intellect) is and what mind is, please refer to insights of verse 7 & 16. Based on that it becomes clear that one must not allow the mind to become the king because if one allows that, then one will simply carry out decisions and actions based on whatever the mind says. Mind always says everything based on the imprints or memories of the past incidents and experiences (which might not necessarily be the truth or righteous) or from the knowledge it has gathered from outside (which also may not necessarily be truthful or right). The intellect (buddhi) is what discriminates between right and wrong, good or bad. Without an active intellect, a person becomes the slave of his mind, unable to control his thoughts, emotions and actions and goes indiscriminately with what his mind says. But if the intellect is sharp (see verse 16), its becomes the king and the mind remains a minister, important and useful, but under the control of the king (intellect). 

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 24

When a road is crowded with five or six thousand people, it is almost impossible to drive a horse carriage along the road; the driver must be careful in driving the carriage. A cyclist’s attention is not directed towards himself but towards the passerby.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that when a road is crowded with 5000 to 6000 people, it is almost impossible to drive a horse carriage along the road and the driver would need to be so careful in driving the carriage through. A cyclist’s attention remains not on himself but towards the passerby.

Additional Notes

 

Bhagwan refers to road as our spiritual path and refers the 5000-6000 crowd of people  to the numerous crowded thoughts and desires in our mind and refers the horse carriage to ourself. He says it is impossible to drive a horse carriage through a crowd of people, meaning it is impossible to move ahead on the spiritual path when there are so many thoughts and desires. It would be a struggle to move the carriage in such a crowd and the speed would also be very slow. Bhagwan then says that the cyclist’s attention remains not on himself but on the passerby, again pointing to the fact that one cannot have single-minded focus with so much of desires in life. For such a person, the attention will always be on the passerby and with inability to keep focus on himself. The horse carriage refers to a clogged path and the cyclist refers to a mind distracted through the passing thoughts and desires (passerby)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 25

When a man is entirely sunk in cold water, he no longer feels the cold of the cold water. A perfect man is not subject to anger.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that when a man is fully submerged in cold water, he no longer feels any cold. A perfect man (Jnani) cannot be subject to anger.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that when you remain in cold water for sometime, you naturally tend to lose the coldness of the water. This is because your body has got acquainted with the cold now and thus become of the same nature of the water’s temperature. Only a person who has not been in cold water and has heat in his body will feel the reflex impact of the coldness of the water. Bhagwan is comparing the man in cold water to a Jnani (self-realised) who has now become one with the creation and realised his true self or true nature like the man who has become one with the water. He is actually a warm-blooded mammal but his nature has attuned with the temperature of the water. So, anything opposite to his nature does not affect him anymore (like the the cold does not affect the man). Bhagwan calls such a man as a perfect man, as his true nature becomes like that of the Supreme (still, calm, pure, limitless) and he never gets affected by anger or any other such adverse qualities.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 26

When a seed is fried, it cannot sprout. When a lamp contains no oil, we do not call it a lamp. When the sun is shining, a gaslight becomes dim. It is the sun that gives light to the whole world. If Manas is regarded as the king, buddhi may be regarded as the prime minister. When a tree does not bear fruits, it has no beauty. There is no effect without cause. In darkness light persists. Darkness is ignorance; light is Jnana (wisdom). One must see oneself . One must return to the place from whence one started. We must return the thing we have borrowed.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that  a fried seed cannot sprout again. A lamp without oil cannot be called a lamp. When the sun shines, the gaslight (a gas lamp) becomes dim. It is the sun that gives light to the whole world and not the gas lamp. If mind is regarded as the king, the intellect may be regarded as the prime minister. A tree bearing no fruits has no beauty. There is no effect without a cause. Light persists even in darkness, where darkness is the ignorance and wisdom is the light. One must see oneself and one must begin to return back to where he had started. All the things borrowed here (on earth) must be returned.

Additional Notes

This verse is the continuation of the previous verse where Bhagwan had mentioned that a perfect man cannot get angry. In this verse he is continuing saying that a fried seed cannot sprout again, meaning, that if all the desires/vasanas/tendencies/samskaras are fried (burnt out from the mind), no reactions can sprout again. When the oil itself is exhausted from the lamp, the lamp cannot be called a lamp anymore (referring to a perfect man who has exhausted all his karmas). He then says when the sun shines, a gaslamp light is automatically dimmed before the light of the sun. He is referring the light of the sun to a perfected man (self-realised) whose light is eternal and enlightening than an imperfect man’s (gaslight) limited light of wisdom, that is nothing before the universal light of the sun. It is the sunlight (a perfect being) that gives light to the whole world. Bhagwan repeats in this verse also, that if the mind is considered to be the King, the intellect then must be higher – the prime minister. He says when a tree does not bear fruit, then it has no beauty. referring to a perfect man, who bears the fruits for the world, which is what makes him beautiful. Hence, he points that everyone must make an attempt to be fruitful. Everything is cause and effect. Without the cause there can be no effect. Then he says that, in the ignorant also there is wisdom hidden – in the darkness also light persists. He is referring to light as the jnana or wisdom and darkness as ignorance. Because a man lost in maya is ignorant about his real identity (read verse 7, 8, 9). Bhagwan then says that one must see oneself – meaning know his true identity (read verse 7, 8, 9). One must return to the place he had started from, meaning return back to the Source. This can only happen when the darkness (ignorance) is destroyed by the inner light (wisdom) of the soul.  The verse ends with Bhagwan stating that we must return everything that we have borrowed. The soul came without anything and gathered everything from the Pancha Mahabhootas (5 natural elements – ether, air, fire, water, earth) and that includes the body too that was borrowed from the elements and all the possessions must be returned back.

Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 27

“A Guru will lead any sort of man from a thorny path to the royal road. Such preceptors are of two kinds. One is the primary preceptor and the other, the secondary preceptor. Mind is the primary preceptor and the other, the secondary preceptor one is not the preceptor of the other. He is only the secondary preceptor. The secondary preceptor is one who shows the water in the well. The Guru who exists in the heart of all beings is the Jagat-Guru.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that a Guru will lead any kind of man from the thorny (ignorant) path to the royal (spiritual) path. Such preceptors (Guru) are of two kinds. One is the primary Guru and the other is the secondary Guru, where mind is the primary (inner) Guru. The secondary (external) Guru is not the Guru of the inner Guru. The external Guru is the one who shows the water in the well (self). The (inner) Guru who exists in the heart of all beings is the Jagat-Guru (universal teacher).

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that a Guru is the one who can lead any kind of a person from the path of darkness to the path of wisdom and light.  Such Gurus are of two kinds. The primary Guru is the mind (meaning the inner self) and the other Guru is the external (physical) Guru. The external Guru is not the Guru of the primary (inner) Guru, but is only the secondary Guru. The physical Guru is the one who shows the water in the well, meaning helps one realise their true inner self. The inner Guru, who exists in the heart of all beings, is the Jagat Guru or the universal Guru.

So, in simple words Bhagwan is stating that the prime Guru is one’s own inner self. The physical Guru from outside introduces one to the inner Guru, and is not the Guru of the inner Guru, because the inner Guru that exists in all beings is the Universal Guru.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 28

“People generally think that a teacher’s body is Guru. A man does not become a Guru by simply wearing sandals and counting beads on a rosary. One who talks “Brahma Jnana” and gives stones to his disciples is not a Guru. Whatever a Guru speaks in words, he must show it in action. First one must practice and after realisation, he must begin to teach others.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that people generally think that the teacher’s physical body is the Guru (read previous verse 27 for clarity). One does not become a Guru by simply wearing sandals and counting beads on a rosary. One who talks about the Brahma Jnana (gems of Ultimate Wisdom) and gives stones to his disciples is not a Guru. Whatever a Guru speaks in words, he must show it in action. First one must practice and after realisation, he teach others.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that mostly people misunderstand the Guru to be the physical body (read previous verse 27 for clarity). He says that one does not become a Guru by external attire like wearing of sandals or counting beads on a rosary (japa mala), meaning the outer appearance or outer practices are not the true determining factors if the person is a Guru or not. Also, one who talks of the gems of Bramha Jnana (wisdom of Self-Realisation) but gives stones to his disciples, is not a Guru. It is only after one practices what he preaches and after realisation of the Ultimate Truth through self-realisation, that he teaches others.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 29

One who has thoroughly wiped off the idea “I am the body” is fit to be called a Guru. There is none higher than such a one. There is no god above such a Guru. Such a Guru is God, and God is such a Guru.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the one who has thoroughly wiped off the idea that of “I am the body” is fit to be called a Guru. There is none higher than such a Guru. There is even no God above such a Guru. Such a Guru is God and God is such a Guru.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan further speaks on the quality of a true Guru. He says that only the one who has been able to completely wipe off the ignorance that one is not the body, is fit enough to be a Guru.  He says that there is none higher than such a Guru not even God because such a Guru is God himself and God himself is such a Guru. Bhagwan is emphasising on the true Guru not just intellectually knowing that one is not the body, but experientially remaining in the divine state of Nithyananda (eternal bliss) with no speck of duality – the state of Avadhootas.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 30

If you keep sugar apart from us, we cannot have experience of its sweetness. If we eat it, then only we know its taste. A man cannot get Mukti if he simply repeats “Rama, Krishna, or Govinda” for a thousand years. He must repeat it heartily (with true feelings).”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that if you keep sugar away, you cannot know its sweetness. Only when one eats it, will one experience its taste. A man cannot get Mukti (liberation) simply by repeating ‘Rama, Krishna or Govinda’ even for a thousand years, but he must repeat it whole-heartedly.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that until one tastes sugar, the taste of the sugar can neither be known or described, but it is only when one tastes it, that he will experience what it exactly tastes like. Similarly, one cannot attain liberation simply by chanting the names of ‘Rama, Krishna or Govinda’ and even if that may be chanted for a thousand years. But the real chanting and benefit is when one chants it from the heart (full of love/devotion/emotions/feelings) or with the mind, body and soul.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 31

“Cow milk can never be bitter; the stone fixed in the earth cannot speak; by visiting places of pilgrimage like Benares (presently Varanasi) and Rameshwaram, a man cannot attain Mukti. What is essential is keeping the mind steady for a moment by introversion. Seeing earthen and stone images is not seeing God. It is mind’s hallucination when you regard images as God. Without true Jnana, Mukti cannot be attained. Our taking the human birth is the effect. Giving it back is the cause. We must know the cause and effect. Likewise, we must know the good and the evil; the right and the wrong. Knowing all, peace must be attained.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that just like the cow milk cannot be bitter and the stones in the earth cannot speak, man cannot attain liberation by undertaking pilgrimage to holy places like Varanasi and Rameshwaram. What is more essential is keeping the mind steady through introspection. Seeing stone and clay idols are not seeing God, but when one regards image or form to God, they are nothing but the mind’s hallucinations. Without true Jnana (wisdom) liberation is not possible. It is important to understand the cause and effect (of karma). Taking birth is the cause and giving it back is the cause. Likewise, we must know what is good and what is evil, what is right and what is wrong. Knowing all this, peace must be attained.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan clarifies many wrong superstitions and fantasies about the path of liberation. He says that just as certain that cow’s milk will never taste bitter and as certain as stones will never speak, it is certain that by undertaking pilgrimages to sacred places like Vanarasi or Rameshwaram, one attain mukti (liberation). But instead what is more important is to practice to keep the mind steady without wavering. Most previous verses above are indicative of how Bhagwan is emphasising on making the mind pure by which stillness and steadiness be achieved.

Further he says you cannot see God by looking at clay or stone idols, for even what you see is the mind’s hallucinations. Without the true wisdom about all this, liberation cannot be attained. It is more important to know the cause and effect (which brings humans again and again on the earth plane without allowing liberation from the birth-death cycle). Getting human birth is the cause and giving it back is the effect. Without understanding this there is no liberation (please refer below notes for more clarity on cause and effect).

Bhagwan further says that in this manner, knowing the cause and effect, we would be able to know the good and the evil, the right and the wrong, and thus knowing righteousness. This can happen when the power of discrimination (viveka) is sharp and for that, as per verse 16, 22 & 23, the buddhi must be sharpened. Finally, this current verse ends with Bhagwan stating that “Knowing all this, peace would be attained.”

What is cause and effect

Cause and effect is what we refer to as the law of Karma. For every cause there is an effect, meaning for every action there is a consequence, what seed you sow that fruit you reap. With what type seed of thought you sow, similar type of fruit of deed you will reap. With what type of seed of deed you sow, similar type of fruit of habit you will reap. With what type of seed of habit you sow, similar type of fruit of destiny you will reap. Every little thing in existence is the result of cause and effect. Putting your hand into fire is the cause and getting burnt is the effect. Speaking a harsh word is the cause. Getting back a harsh word or action from that person back sooner or later is the effect. Putting good food into the body is the cause and getting back good health is the effect. Putting bad thoughts into the mind is the cause and agitation, conflict, lack of peace, etc is the effect. This is how cause and effect work in human lives.

So it is important to understand this cause and effect is what Bhagwan says. This is how he is referring to the human birth also the outcome of the cause and effect. Taking human birth is the cause and giving it back (death) is the effect. Birth becomes the cause and death becomes the effect. When death happens, death becomes the cause now and next birth is the effect of that cause. And the birth and death so goes on, completely depending on the cause and effect. This is why Bhagwan says that unless this true wisdom of this cause and effect is  realised liberation is not possible.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 32

“If a building has no doors, we cannot call it a “house”. Without fire, we cannot heat water. Without air, fire cannot burn. Without food and sleep, a man can live for a few days but without air (breathing), a man cannot live even for a few seconds.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that just like how if a building has no doors, it cannot be called a house, just like how without fire the water cannot be heated, and just like how without air, fire cannot burn, similarly, without food and sleep it may be possible for a man to live for a few days, but without air, he cannot live even for a few seconds.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan is pointing to how important air is for a human being to live, because he may continue for a couple of days without food and water but without breath, he cannot live even for a few seconds. He compares this with how a building cannot be called a house if there are no doors and how without fire water cannot be heated and how without air, fire cannot burn.

Now, it is important to know here that Bhagwan is not simply talking about breathing air. He is actually talking about the prana. Air that we breath is gross and with that air what comes in is the subtle prana, that the body utilises for its sustenance. (He has explained this more deep in verse 11)

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 33

“Destruction of the world means transforming it into Vayu; Raja Yoga is the place of indivisible monism. If you enter the ONE, you lose sight of the MANY.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that destruction of the world (duality) means transforming it into air (nonduality) for which Raja Yoga(Royal Path) is the means of indivisible monism (Oneness). If you enter the ONE (nondual), you automatically lose sight of the MANY (dual).

Additional Notes

Bhagwan in this verse is talking of how to transcend from duality to nonduality, which is the highest evolution of human to attain liberation. This verse is the continuation of the previous verse where Bhagwan had spoken on the importance of air (prana) for the sustenance of human life. He now continues stating that destruction of the world means transforming it into Vayu (prana). With destruction of the world he is referring to the destruction of duality and not the physical destruction of the tangible world. When the seeker purifies and depends less on physical matter and more on the subtle prana, he is getting transformed into light, into nondual existence, thus losing his perception of maya (illusion) expressed in the duality of the world. Everything loses its dual nature and converts into oneness for him when he transforms his existence into air (prana) and that is why he says “Destruction of the world is transforming it into Vayu (prana).

He then says Raja Yoga (the Royal path) is the means of attaining this. Raja Yoga is the place of indivisible Monism (Oneness). He then says, when you enter into Oneness, the many (duality) will disappear on it’s own for the seeker.

What is Raja Yoga?

Raja means “king”. Raja Yoga is referred to thus the Royal Path or the highest path. Raja Yoga deals with meditation and breathwork, focussing more on the body and mind. Raja Yoga is also known as Ashtanga Yoga where “ashta” means “eight” – the 8 limbs taught by Maharishi Patanjali. It goes step-by-step to attain the state of self-realisation. The 8 steps are:

  1. Yama: Yama means restraints.• Ahimsa (non-violence): Non-voilence does not just mean refraining from injuring any being but also noninjury of any creature in thoughts, words or deeds.
     Satya (honesty, truthfulness): Refraining from from any kind of lying, manipulation, or deviation from the truth.
     Asteya (stealing, non-covetousness): Refraining from stealing anything that belongs to others and that which does not belong to you. Stealing means not just about stealing physical things, but also refraining from other subtle stealing like stealing others’ energy, ideas, time, space, privacy, etc.
     Aparigraha (non-greediness, non-covetousness): Refraining from greed of possessing that which belongs to others. It is greed that makes one desire or crave for something that one does not own or have, like viewing to covet other’s spouse, other’s wealth, other’s name and fame, other’s positions or status, other’s fortunes, etc. The desire to hoard, store, thinking about only one’s own existence is also also greed.
     Brahmacharya (continence, moderation in all sensual pleasures): Refraining from sensual activities by disciplining the senses through diet, Yoga and meditation. Brahmacharya means celebacy, but it essecially points out towards sublimation of lower desires into higher desires. When sexual energies are sublimated into higher passions like creativity, unconditional love, compassion, oneness.
  2. Niyama: Niyama means disciplines. Saucha (cleanliness): Cleanliness means keeping the body, mind and also the surroundings around a person clean. Practice of cleanliness strengthens the discipline of the body and mind.
     Santosha (contentment):  Being content with what life has to offer. Practicing contentment helps develop tolerance, patience, appreciation, happiness and peace.
     Tapas (austerity, self-discipline): Austerity is working on oneself on all levels – physical, mental and emotional through regular disciplines, routines, schedules like discipline of time in waking-sleeping, exercise, work, play, etc. Austerity is working on the meditational practices to achieve stability of the mind, body and emotions.
     Swadhyaya (study of the Self): Swadhyaya essentially means “self-study”, meaning studying and contemplating on oneself. It allows one to become more aware of oneself and thus educate, train, improve and monitor oneself better.
     Ishwarapranidhana (surrendering to Supreme/Personal God/Guru): It emphasising on doing one’s duty without expecting the fruits of that action but surrendering it to the highest. Highest can vary from person to person, like one’s highest submission could be towards the god, diety or guru that one believes in. Surrender means being neutral and accepting whatever happens as the will of the higher power because of the undersatnding that everything that is best for one may not be known or accepted easily by the ego. Hence, surrender to higher will makes a big difference in the seeker’s life,
  3. Asana: Asana means posture.Asana essentially means one’s ability to sit straight and steady without any back or side support, preferably in sukhasana, padmasana or vajrasana. The body is the biggest obstacle for meditation and hence establishing this discipline is training the body for meditation.
  4. Pranayama: Pranayama means disciplining of the prana.
    The prana is disciplined through the practice of pranayama or control of breath.  There are various  is attained through the  practice aims at controlling prana through control of the breath. Pranayama is breathwork and there are various practices from beginner level to highly advanced practices. It is essentially these practices that enhances prana in the practitioner and helps dissolving physical to subtle (that the current verse (33) of Chidakasha Gita speaks of.
  5. Pratyahara: Pratyahara means withdrawalPratyahara is withdrawing the senses from objects or withdrawing the mind from the senses. These are all steps of achievement. If all the earlier 4 steps are practiced and attained by the practitioner, Pratyahara becomes more naturally the state of the seeker, because by now, the seeker has now attained great purity through the Yamas and Niyamas, having the senses withdrawn, and achieved steadiness in posture, which helps prana regulate in the physical and etheric bodies.
  6. Dharana: Dharana means concentration.Dharana happens when the mind is withdrawn and can remain focused steadily on its object of concentration for any period of time that the seeker decides to. When one reaches this stage, one is able to easily manifest or materialise very easily anything the seeker desires. This is the stage where the aspirant needs to exercise more caution with the attainment of Siddhis and the tendency of falling for greed and illusion.
  7. Dhyana: Dhyana means meditation.When the mind becomes totally concentrated and steady, it becomes still and calm, and if this state is maintained undisturbed for about 2 minutes, the aspirant falls naturally into meditation. In such a state of meditation, the aspirant has no more awareness of space and time.  From here begins further levels of dissolution of the mind as it delves more into deeper meditative states.
  8. Samadhi: Samadhi means the transcendental state of nothingness.Samadhi is also called the Turiya state, the fourth state of consciousness, where the limitations of body, senses, mind, intellect and ego are transcended. (See verse 10 for details of the 4 states of consciousness). One is able to fall into the Turiya state when one is able to maintain dhyana  uninterrupted for about 30 minutes. In this state, the aspirant experiences the Self, the Atman. (see verses 7, 8, & 9).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 35

You must not leave the feet of a guru. Your mind should not flicker like the reflection of the sun in the shaking water.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that you must not leave the feet of a guru and the mind should not flicker like how the reflection of the sun flickers on the shaking water.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that one must not leave the feet of the guru and this is not meaning the physical feet. Being at the feet of the guru symbolises surrender. It is only when there is submission to the guru’s energies that the transmission of grace happens. Hence, one always remains surrendered to the guru without allowing the mind to flicker like how the sun’s reflection flickers on the shaking water. He is referring to “shaking” water, because it is easy for the reflection to stay still on still water but when the water gets shaky, the reflection also flickers. Shaky waters symbolises uneven or shaky times.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 36

The sea water is boundless; the tank water has a boundary. Our mind must be like the tank water. Mind is the cause of good and evil. A man may be good and bad according to his good or bad thoughts. God does not do good or evil to any man. The reason is, intelligence and knowledge are the divine faculties in man. A man protected by good thoughts, cannot be harmed even by a cannon shot. Without yoga, liberation from karma is impossible.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the sea water is boundless but the tank water has a boundary. Our mind must be like the tank water because mind is the cause of all good and bad thoughts. God does not do good or bad to man but a man becomes good or bad according to his thoughts because the divine faculties of intelligence and knowledge exist  in man. A man who is protected by good thoughts cannot be harmed even by a cannon shot. Without yoga, liberation from karma is impossible.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that one’s mind must be kept in control with proper boundaries defined for it, just like the tank water that is bound by the container within its boundary, and not like the sea water that is boundless. He says that mind is the cause of all good and bad, due to which karma is created. Thus, how good or bad a man is depends on how good or bad his thoughts are. Man attracts good and bad consequences according to this own thoughts and god has nothing to do with it. God neither does good nor bad to man, because man already has the divine faculties of intelligence and knowledge within him, which are his tools for knowing and choosing between good and bad. Bhagwan says that a man who is nourishes good thoughts is always protected and cannot be harmed even by a cannot shot. He says for that that liberation from karma is needed and without yoga liberation from karma is impossible.

It is important to note that “yoga” does not mean yogasanas, but he is referring to Raja Yoga (for more details on yoga, please refer verse 33).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 37

Without knowing the secret (truth), if we simply decorate the exterior skin, our karma will not leave us; one cannot be a Sanyasi by external signs if he is internally a hypocrite. What you think, you must speak; what you speak, you must show by your acts. Do what you say; say what you do. Such a man is a Jnani; he is a Paramahansa; he is a Yogi; he is a Sanyasi. One who has conquered desire is a true Sanyasi. Only a desireless man is fit to be a spiritual teacher.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that without knowing the secret (reality), if we simply decorate our bodies, karma is not going to leave us. One cannot be a Sanyasi (Sanyasi) by external appearance if internally he is a hypocrite. You must speak what you think and also show it in your acts. You must do what you say and say what you do. Only such a person is a Jnani (enlightened), he is a Paramahansa (liberated), he is a Yogi (aspirant), he is a Sanyasi (ascetic). Only the one who has conquered desire is a true Sanyasi. Only such a desireless man is fit to be a spiritual teacher.

Additional Notes

In this verse, Bhagwan talks deeply about the reality of who actually can be called a spiritual teacher. He says that without knowing the truth of this matter, if one just decorates their skin, karma is not going to leave them. Skin decorations means all the external decorations done on the body like with chola (attire/garb), mala (beads/rosary/lockets), vibhuti (sacred ash/vermilion), daadi (beard), jata (dreadlocks), kundal (earrings/ bracelets), paduka (footwear).  He says one cannot become a Sanyasi (renunciate) just by changing external appearance but internally remaining a hypocrite.

For that, Bhagwan points out the importance of being very honest and transparent by speaking exactly what you think and whatever one speaks must reflect in their actions too. For that he says, do what you say and say what you do. Such a person, Bhagwan defines as the real Jnani (enlightened), the real Paramahansa (liberated), the real Yogi (aspirant), the real Sanyasi (ascetic). He is pointing to the fact that all hypocrisy comes from the subtle hidden desires, which is why he says that only the one who has conquered desires is a true Sanyasi (ascetic) and that only such a desireless person is fit to be a spiritual teacher. The eligibility of this is emphasized, because if even the smallest desire remains, even the best of teachings of the spiritual teacher will have the impurity of some selfish motive, and thus such a service cannot be of the highest and purest. Whereas the one who is desireless, will have absolutely zero percentage of any selfish motive and thus render purely selfless service, which will automatically render the purest wisdom and energies for the highest good of the world.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 38

What is served for others, should not be eaten by us. We must place a separate leaf for us and eat our food.

INSIGHTS ~ 

Bhagwan says the food that is served for others, must not be eaten by us. We must instead take a separate leaf (plate) for ourselves and eat that food.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan refers food to spiritual wisdom or experiences. He says that whatever is served for everyone generally, may not serve individual purpose. What is written, spoken, given as spiritual wisdom generally to all (through books, preachings or any such mediums) must not be one’s food. It is as good as eating what was served for others or belonging to others. So not all spiritual wisdom provided to the world needs to be eaten (received) by us. He says we must rather place a separate leaf (in olden days banana leafs were the food plates) for ourselves and eat our food from it, meaning we must practice the wisdom and experience it ourselves. When you place your own leaf, you will only take what you can consume, digest and experience it wholly also. In other words, not everything that you see as spiritual wisdom out there is needed for you. One must known what is best suited for oneself and individually strive for that. In other words it also relates to the fact that what is served for someone is meant to be for them and thus one must not eat from what was meant for others. It is directly speaking about “astheya” from the Raja Yoga (Ashtanga Yoga) that Bhagwan mentions in verse 33, which clearly defines not viewing or desiring that which belongs to others or is meant for others.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 39

There is nothing like “this one” has more and another has less. The power of thought, the ears, the nose, the hand, the eye, etc. are the same to all.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that in reality there is nothing that one has more and another has less. The power of the thought, ears, nose, hand, eye, etc is similar in everyone.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan says that everyone has been equally gifted with the power of thinking, discriminating, choosing, deciding, creating, through various sense organs and physical organs of the body. Thus, there is nothing like someone has more and someone has less, because all are equally blessed with the same gifts to get through the journey of life. The Supreme does not discriminate anyone as higher or lower and all are given support and opportunities equally. Hence, one cannot cannot use the excuse that someone is more blessed than them. All are equally blessed; it is all about how one takes individual responsibility and utilises their gifts.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 40

The nose is not the place where the eye is. Walking should be done by the legs only. Work done by the hands cannot be done by the head.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the nose is not in the place of the eyes. Walking can be done with the use of legs only. Similarly, work can be done by hands only and not the head.

Additional Notes

This is a continuation of the previous verse, where Bhagwan had mentioned how everyone is blessed equally. In this verse he continues saying that everything in the cosmos is created very purposely and nothing is disorganised. He refers to how the nose cannot be where the eyes are and how walking can be done by the legs alone  and how head cannot be used for doing a work but only hands have to be used. Similarly, everything has it’s purpose in creation and hence all the tools needs to be rightly discriminated and utilised appropriately.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 41

“The head is the ocean of ananda (bliss). In it is situated the Prana Linga, i.e., the seat of liberation (Mukti). This cannot be learnt from books. It is inherent in the brain. The book consists of parts, but Jnana is the indivisible one. A book consists of chapters, but Jnana is single chaptered. For those who have not realised, a book is necessary; but to a man of realisation, there is only one undivided being. When a man takes birth, he is not born with a book in his hand but he is born with a brain. While coming (to this world) and going away (from this world), a man has no book in his hand. Only in the middle period he takes a book.”

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that the head is the ocean of bliss, where is situated the prana linga, which is the seat of liberation. This cannot be learnt from books as it is inherent in the brain. The book consists of various parts but the wisdom is always undivided. A book consists of chapters but wisdom is a single chapter. A book is necessary only those those who have not realised but to the one who has realised the Self, he is not born with a book in his hand but he is born with a brain. While coming and going into this world, man has no book in his hand, but only in the middle period he takes a book.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan in this verse talks about the wisdom gained from external sources, like books, and the wisdom gained from the inner Source. He says, that the head is the ocean of bliss. He is pointing to the Sahasrar. When the Kundalini shakti reaches the Sahasrar and remains there, there is an explosion of bliss, which is why this place is referred to as the ‘ocean of ananda (bliss)’. This is the place which is considered to be the seat of Prana Linga, which is the seat of liberation.  Bhagwan then says that this can be only and only experienced and never learnt from books, meaning this true wisdom is received from the inner source and not from external sources, because this wisdom is inherent in the brain. He says books consists of various parts, meaning they are all fragmented, but jnana (true wisdom) is indivisible. A book  consists of parts but true wisdom is one whole chapter. Such books are needed only for the one who has not yet realised the Self but to the one who has realised their Self, there is only one whole undivided nondual being experienced, whose source of wisdom is also from that Source that he has become one with. Bhagwan then says that when a man is born he is born not with a book in his hand but with a brain, emphasising that this is the brain (sahasrar) is the true source of wisdom that the man should be relying and not the artificial source of wisdom from a book. Also that while coming (birth) and going (death) from this world, man has no book in his hand, meaning at the time of birth and at the time of death, books will not help, but what man has truly experienced. So, not at birth or at death, but man picks up books during his lifetime. This points in clarity that man depends on books only when he is not yet aware and thus unable to turn towards the true wisdom by activating the Prana Linga by reaching the prana to the sahasrar through practice.

The whole verse simply points to the fact that books are somebody else’s limited wisdom, written through the limited dimensions of the mind and intellect, which need not be the purest and which can never become the reader’s experience, but that wisdom which is the true reliable wisdom is that of one’s own experience, which comes from one’s inner Source, and this is the Inner Source is that indivisible Source of Creation itself, from where the Vedas were known to be born from. Bhagwan in this verse points depending on this Source.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 42

When a man is born, he is perfect; when he goes away then also, he is perfect. In the middle, he is subject to Maya. That which pervades in all directions is ONE, indivisible; that which is limited, is divisible.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that when a man is born and when a man dies, he is perfect but only in the middle (life) he is subject to maya (illusion). That which is spread in all directions is limitless and indivisible but that which is limited is divisible.

Additional Notes

This is a continuation to the previous verse where Bhagwan had indicated that when a man comes into this world and goes out of this world he does not need a book but it is only in between, during his life, he needs a book. Book represents external wisdom and dependence on external sources. Similarly, in this verse he continues saying that when a man is born or when he dies, he is perfect but only in the middle (during life) is he subject to Maya (illusion). Birth and death are two moments in humans when the consciousness is activated to its full reality, when man experiences his true self. During these moments he is fully aware and conscious of his true identity and is not subject to anything illusory in the world that he is going to be born into or the world that he is leaving. At these moments of birth and death, he neither is dependant on external sources, as his consciousness is turned within and these are the moments he is aligned with the ultimate truth.

What does it mean that man is “perfect” at birth and death?

A child, when born, is completely aware of who it is, as the memories of it’s soul journey till there is completely active, for it is in the pure state of soul consciousness. The soul of the child is aware of who it was in the past life and what agenda it has to fulfil in this lifetime. As the child enters into the illusory world which is far away from the supreme truth, it gradually begins losing hold of its true state and gets more adapted to the illusory world, that it itself chose to experience based on it’s desires. That is how a child, who was at birth experiencing a perfect, limitless, nondual state of consciousness, now when subject to a limited world of duality, begins experiencing dual moments of confusion, surprises, fear, joy, sadness, etc and the child reacts in laughter, cry, agony, fear, surprise, etc. From here, begins it’s journey into maya and slowly it loses awareness of it’s true state and becomes more attuned with the illusions (maya) of the world, as the world begins slowly training the child into a different dual, limited world. From here till death is what Bhagwan is referring to as “middle” phase, in both this and previous verse.

Next, at the time of death, the soul begins remembering back who it really is. Science reveals that man loses consciousness just before death. This is actually the moment when the soul consciousness has turned within and he becomes fully aware of who he really is, the pure soul. These moments are today known to be the 20-sec interval, when just at the moment of death, the whole major life incidents of the person flashes in front of him for 20 seconds very rapidly, but his awareness is able to grasp everything in great details. In this time interval, all those most important aspects of his soul agenda of this life journey flashes before him, showing him what his reality was and what he was supposed to have done with this life and what did he actually do. This is the window period when the soul realises what it achieved or missed due to its entanglement in the illusion of life. The soul thus leaves in full awareness, carrying forth the awareness of how these pending things would be cleared in the forthcoming journey.  These are the moments where the soul is devoid of any illusion and has full clarity of what his pure state of being is, thus it is able to observe and learn everything truly in a pure state of consciousness. It is fully aware of it’s state of oneness with the supreme and universal consciousness. So, this period at the time  of birth and death are the states of consciousness that Bhagwan is referring to as “perfect” state, which is why he says “man is perfect at the time of birth and death”. 

Further, this perfect state is what he is referring to as “all that pervades in all directions is ONE” meaning the individual soul consciousness that is one with Supreme consciousness, infinite, in all directions, omnipresent, limitless and indivisible. This is the real state of who you are. Whatever is separate from this reality is limited and divisible, and that is Maya (illusion).

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 43

At the place where there is running water, there can be no mud; the place is quite clean. Ignorance (ajnana) is mud; the current of water is Bhakti and Jnana.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says that at the place where there is running water, there can be no mud and the place is quite clean.  He says ignorance (ajnana) is the mud and bhakti and jnana is the current of water.

Additional Notes

Continuing from the previous verse where Bhagwan had mentioned that only at the time of birth and at the time of death does man be in his perfect state of union with the supreme truth (jnana) of it’s real state of pure awareness, he mentioned that it is during life when the soul is entangled in maya that it remains in ajnana (ignorance). In this verse, he continues telling how this ignorance can be removed. He says that where there is running water, there cannot be mud. Mud he refers to as the ignorance. Mud cannot stay there because it gets washed away in the flow of the running water. The current of the running water is what he refers to as bhakti (devotion) and jnana (true wisdom). So, Bhagwan says that ignorance can be removed with devotion, faith and aligning with the true wisdom. With devotion he means Universal Love, which can be seen elaborated in the next verse.

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Chidakasha Gita ~ Verse: 44

It is not Bhakti to give a man some money or to give him a meal as charity. Bhakti is universal love. Seeing God, in all beings, without the least idea of duality, is Bhakti.

INSIGHTS ~

Bhagwan says it is not bhakti (devotion) to give man some money or to give him a meal as charity. The real bhakti is universal love. Seeing god in every being without the least idea of duality is bhakti.

Additional Notes

Bhagwan gives a completely new meaning to what we normally believe bhakti to be. Normally, bhakti means devotion to god or guru or ishta. It is worshiping and respecting that element of god in any element that the worshipper has faith in. Like, a seeker may be moved in devotion when he sees god in guru, sees god in an animal, sees god in a tree, sees god in an idol, sees god in parents, etc. Out of this bhakti, he will have reverence, love and affinity for them out of which he will do something for them. A spiritual seeker may be moved with compassion seeing a beggar or a person needing help and thus he might do some charity, trying to help him with some food or money. But Bhagwan says bhakti is not giving man some money or a meal as charity. The real bhakti is universal love. Seeing god not just selectively, but seeing god in every being (all species) without having even the least bit of discrimination of duality – is true devotion.

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